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If A is NP-complete and it is polynomial time reducible to B, then B is NP-hard.

If B is polynomial time reducible to C and C is NP-complete, then B is in NP.

A problem in NP which is in NP-hard is NP-complete.

Another way to show B is NP-complete is to notice that any two NP-complete problems (e.g A and C) are polynomially reducible to each other, and thus B is equivalent (two-way polynomially reducible) to any NP-complete problem.

If A is NP-complete and it is polynomial time reducible to B, then B is NP-hard.

If B is polynomial time reducible to C and C is NP-complete, then B is in NP.

A problem in NP which is in NP-hard is NP-complete.

If A is NP-complete and it is polynomial time reducible to B, then B is NP-hard.

If B is polynomial time reducible to C and C is NP-complete, then B is in NP.

A problem in NP which is in NP-hard is NP-complete.

Another way to show B is NP-complete is to notice that any two NP-complete problems (e.g A and C) are polynomially reducible to each other, and thus B is equivalent (two-way polynomially reducible) to any NP-complete problem.

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source | link

If A is NP-complete and it is polynomial time reducible to B, then B is NP-hard.

If B is polynomial time reducible to C and C is NP-complete, then B is in NP.

A problem in NP which is in NP-hard is NP-complete.