3 Improve formatting
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Here's an approach based on triangulation that is pretty straightforward to implement and can be made to run in O(N^2N2).

BTW, O(N^2N2) is optimal for this problem. Imagine two polygons shaped like pitchfork blades intersecting at right angles. Each has a number of segments proportional to the number of tines; the number of polygons in the intersection is proportional to the square of the number of tines.

  1. First, triangulate each polygon.

  2. Compare all the triangles from P pairwise with all the triangles from Q to detect intersections. Any pair of intersecting triangles can be broken into smaller triangles each of which is in P, in Q, or in the intersection. (Whatever you used in step 1 can be reused to help with this.) Only keep triangles that are in the intersection.

  3. Compute the neighbors of each triangle, by comparing them pairwise, and build an adjacency graph. This graph will contain one connected subgraph for each polygon in the intersection of P and Q.

  4. For each such subgraph, pick a triangle, walk to the edge, and then walk around the edge, producing the segments bounding the corresponding output polygon.

Here's an approach based on triangulation that is pretty straightforward to implement and can be made to run in O(N^2).

BTW, O(N^2) is optimal for this problem. Imagine two polygons shaped like pitchfork blades intersecting at right angles. Each has a number of segments proportional to the number of tines; the number of polygons in the intersection is proportional to the square of the number of tines.

  1. First, triangulate each polygon.

  2. Compare all the triangles from P pairwise with all the triangles from Q to detect intersections. Any pair of intersecting triangles can be broken into smaller triangles each of which is in P, in Q, or in the intersection. (Whatever you used in step 1 can be reused to help with this.) Only keep triangles that are in the intersection.

  3. Compute the neighbors of each triangle, by comparing them pairwise, and build an adjacency graph. This graph will contain one connected subgraph for each polygon in the intersection of P and Q.

  4. For each such subgraph, pick a triangle, walk to the edge, and then walk around the edge, producing the segments bounding the corresponding output polygon.

Here's an approach based on triangulation that is pretty straightforward to implement and can be made to run in O(N2).

BTW, O(N2) is optimal for this problem. Imagine two polygons shaped like pitchfork blades intersecting at right angles. Each has a number of segments proportional to the number of tines; the number of polygons in the intersection is proportional to the square of the number of tines.

  1. First, triangulate each polygon.

  2. Compare all the triangles from P pairwise with all the triangles from Q to detect intersections. Any pair of intersecting triangles can be broken into smaller triangles each of which is in P, in Q, or in the intersection. (Whatever you used in step 1 can be reused to help with this.) Only keep triangles that are in the intersection.

  3. Compute the neighbors of each triangle, by comparing them pairwise, and build an adjacency graph. This graph will contain one connected subgraph for each polygon in the intersection of P and Q.

  4. For each such subgraph, pick a triangle, walk to the edge, and then walk around the edge, producing the segments bounding the corresponding output polygon.

2 added 12 characters in body
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Here's an approach based on triangulation that is pretty straightforward to implement and can be made to run in O(N^2).

BTW, O(N^2) is optimal for this problem. Imagine two polygons shaped like pitchfork blades intersecting at right angles. Each has a number of segments proportional to the number of tines; the number of polygons in the intersection is proportional to the square of the number of tines.

First, triangulate each polygon.

Compare all the triangles from P pairwise with all the triangles from Q to detect intersections. Any pair of intersecting triangles can be broken into smaller triangles each of which is in P, in Q, or in the intersection. (Whatever you used in step 1 can be reused to help with this.) Only keep triangles that are in the intersection.

Compute the neighbors of each triangle, by comparing them pairwise, and build an adjacency graph. This graph will contain one connected subgraph for each polygon in the intersection of P and Q.

For each such subgraph, pick a triangle, walk to the edge, and then walk around the edge, producing the segments bounding the corresponding output polygon.

  1. First, triangulate each polygon.

  2. Compare all the triangles from P pairwise with all the triangles from Q to detect intersections. Any pair of intersecting triangles can be broken into smaller triangles each of which is in P, in Q, or in the intersection. (Whatever you used in step 1 can be reused to help with this.) Only keep triangles that are in the intersection.

  3. Compute the neighbors of each triangle, by comparing them pairwise, and build an adjacency graph. This graph will contain one connected subgraph for each polygon in the intersection of P and Q.

  4. For each such subgraph, pick a triangle, walk to the edge, and then walk around the edge, producing the segments bounding the corresponding output polygon.

Here's an approach based on triangulation that is pretty straightforward to implement and can be made to run in O(N^2).

BTW, O(N^2) is optimal for this problem. Imagine two polygons shaped like pitchfork blades intersecting at right angles. Each has a number of segments proportional to the number of tines; the number of polygons in the intersection is proportional to the square of the number of tines.

First, triangulate each polygon.

Compare all the triangles from P pairwise with all the triangles from Q to detect intersections. Any pair of intersecting triangles can be broken into smaller triangles each of which is in P, in Q, or in the intersection. (Whatever you used in step 1 can be reused to help with this.) Only keep triangles that are in the intersection.

Compute the neighbors of each triangle, by comparing them pairwise, and build an adjacency graph. This graph will contain one connected subgraph for each polygon in the intersection of P and Q.

For each such subgraph, pick a triangle, walk to the edge, and then walk around the edge, producing the segments bounding the corresponding output polygon.

Here's an approach based on triangulation that is pretty straightforward to implement and can be made to run in O(N^2).

BTW, O(N^2) is optimal for this problem. Imagine two polygons shaped like pitchfork blades intersecting at right angles. Each has a number of segments proportional to the number of tines; the number of polygons in the intersection is proportional to the square of the number of tines.

  1. First, triangulate each polygon.

  2. Compare all the triangles from P pairwise with all the triangles from Q to detect intersections. Any pair of intersecting triangles can be broken into smaller triangles each of which is in P, in Q, or in the intersection. (Whatever you used in step 1 can be reused to help with this.) Only keep triangles that are in the intersection.

  3. Compute the neighbors of each triangle, by comparing them pairwise, and build an adjacency graph. This graph will contain one connected subgraph for each polygon in the intersection of P and Q.

  4. For each such subgraph, pick a triangle, walk to the edge, and then walk around the edge, producing the segments bounding the corresponding output polygon.

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Here's an approach based on triangulation that is pretty straightforward to implement and can be made to run in O(N^2).

BTW, O(N^2) is optimal for this problem. Imagine two polygons shaped like pitchfork blades intersecting at right angles. Each has a number of segments proportional to the number of tines; the number of polygons in the intersection is proportional to the square of the number of tines.

First, triangulate each polygon.

Compare all the triangles from P pairwise with all the triangles from Q to detect intersections. Any pair of intersecting triangles can be broken into smaller triangles each of which is in P, in Q, or in the intersection. (Whatever you used in step 1 can be reused to help with this.) Only keep triangles that are in the intersection.

Compute the neighbors of each triangle, by comparing them pairwise, and build an adjacency graph. This graph will contain one connected subgraph for each polygon in the intersection of P and Q.

For each such subgraph, pick a triangle, walk to the edge, and then walk around the edge, producing the segments bounding the corresponding output polygon.