2 improved formatting
source | link

For a large database, I am reluctant to lose the size and speed advantages of the numeric representation. I often end up with a database table representing the Enum.

You can enforce database consistency by declaring a foreign key -- although in some cases it might be better to not declare that as a foreign key constraint, which imposes a cost on every transaction. You can ensure consistency by periodically doing a check, at times of your choosing, with:

SELECT reftable.* FROM reftable LEFT JOIN enumtable ON reftable.enum_ref_id=enumtable.enum_id WHERE enumtable.enum_id IS NULL;

SELECT reftable.* FROM reftable
  LEFT JOIN enumtable ON reftable.enum_ref_id = enumtable.enum_id
WHERE enumtable.enum_id IS NULL;

The other half of this solution is to write some test code that checks that the Java enum and the database enum table have the same contents. That's left as an exercise for the reader.

For a large database, I am reluctant to lose the size and speed advantages of the numeric representation. I often end up with a database table representing the Enum.

You can enforce database consistency by declaring a foreign key -- although in some cases it might be better to not declare that as a foreign key constraint, which imposes a cost on every transaction. You can ensure consistency by periodically doing a check, at times of your choosing, with:

SELECT reftable.* FROM reftable LEFT JOIN enumtable ON reftable.enum_ref_id=enumtable.enum_id WHERE enumtable.enum_id IS NULL;

The other half of this solution is to write some test code that checks that the Java enum and the database enum table have the same contents. That's left as an exercise for the reader.

For a large database, I am reluctant to lose the size and speed advantages of the numeric representation. I often end up with a database table representing the Enum.

You can enforce database consistency by declaring a foreign key -- although in some cases it might be better to not declare that as a foreign key constraint, which imposes a cost on every transaction. You can ensure consistency by periodically doing a check, at times of your choosing, with:

SELECT reftable.* FROM reftable
  LEFT JOIN enumtable ON reftable.enum_ref_id = enumtable.enum_id
WHERE enumtable.enum_id IS NULL;

The other half of this solution is to write some test code that checks that the Java enum and the database enum table have the same contents. That's left as an exercise for the reader.

1
source | link

For a large database, I am reluctant to lose the size and speed advantages of the numeric representation. I often end up with a database table representing the Enum.

You can enforce database consistency by declaring a foreign key -- although in some cases it might be better to not declare that as a foreign key constraint, which imposes a cost on every transaction. You can ensure consistency by periodically doing a check, at times of your choosing, with:

SELECT reftable.* FROM reftable LEFT JOIN enumtable ON reftable.enum_ref_id=enumtable.enum_id WHERE enumtable.enum_id IS NULL;

The other half of this solution is to write some test code that checks that the Java enum and the database enum table have the same contents. That's left as an exercise for the reader.