2 replaced http://stackoverflow.com/ with https://stackoverflow.com/
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For one thing, UML is a rich language, meaning there is more than one way to describe the same thing. That's one reason you find different ways described in different books (and conflicting answers on SO).

But a key issue is the huge disconnect between UML and source code. How a specific source code construct is represented in UML, and vice versa, is not part of the UML specification at all. To my knowledge, only one language (Java) has an official UML profile, and that's out of date.

So the representation of specific source-language constructs are left to the tool vendors, and therefore differ. If you intend to generate code from your model, you must follow the vendor's conventions. If, conversely, you wish to generate a model from existing source code, you get a model based on those same conventions. But if you transfer that model to a different tool (which is difficult at the best of times) and generate code out of that, you won't end up with the same code.

In language-and-tool-agnostic mode, my take on which relationships to use in which situations can be found herehere. One point there worth repeating is that I don't use undirected associations in source-code models, precisely because they have no obvious counterpart in actual code. If in the code class A has a reference to class B, and B also has one to A, then I draw two relationships instead.

For one thing, UML is a rich language, meaning there is more than one way to describe the same thing. That's one reason you find different ways described in different books (and conflicting answers on SO).

But a key issue is the huge disconnect between UML and source code. How a specific source code construct is represented in UML, and vice versa, is not part of the UML specification at all. To my knowledge, only one language (Java) has an official UML profile, and that's out of date.

So the representation of specific source-language constructs are left to the tool vendors, and therefore differ. If you intend to generate code from your model, you must follow the vendor's conventions. If, conversely, you wish to generate a model from existing source code, you get a model based on those same conventions. But if you transfer that model to a different tool (which is difficult at the best of times) and generate code out of that, you won't end up with the same code.

In language-and-tool-agnostic mode, my take on which relationships to use in which situations can be found here. One point there worth repeating is that I don't use undirected associations in source-code models, precisely because they have no obvious counterpart in actual code. If in the code class A has a reference to class B, and B also has one to A, then I draw two relationships instead.

For one thing, UML is a rich language, meaning there is more than one way to describe the same thing. That's one reason you find different ways described in different books (and conflicting answers on SO).

But a key issue is the huge disconnect between UML and source code. How a specific source code construct is represented in UML, and vice versa, is not part of the UML specification at all. To my knowledge, only one language (Java) has an official UML profile, and that's out of date.

So the representation of specific source-language constructs are left to the tool vendors, and therefore differ. If you intend to generate code from your model, you must follow the vendor's conventions. If, conversely, you wish to generate a model from existing source code, you get a model based on those same conventions. But if you transfer that model to a different tool (which is difficult at the best of times) and generate code out of that, you won't end up with the same code.

In language-and-tool-agnostic mode, my take on which relationships to use in which situations can be found here. One point there worth repeating is that I don't use undirected associations in source-code models, precisely because they have no obvious counterpart in actual code. If in the code class A has a reference to class B, and B also has one to A, then I draw two relationships instead.

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source | link

For one thing, UML is a rich language, meaning there is more than one way to describe the same thing. That's one reason you find different ways described in different books (and conflicting answers on SO).

But a key issue is the huge disconnect between UML and source code. How a specific source code construct is represented in UML, and vice versa, is not part of the UML specification at all. To my knowledge, only one language (Java) has an official UML profile, and that's out of date.

So the representation of specific source-language constructs are left to the tool vendors, and therefore differ. If you intend to generate code from your model, you must follow the vendor's conventions. If, conversely, you wish to generate a model from existing source code, you get a model based on those same conventions. But if you transfer that model to a different tool (which is difficult at the best of times) and generate code out of that, you won't end up with the same code.

In language-and-tool-agnostic mode, my take on which relationships to use in which situations can be found here. One point there worth repeating is that I don't use undirected associations in source-code models, precisely because they have no obvious counterpart in actual code. If in the code class A has a reference to class B, and B also has one to A, then I draw two relationships instead.