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Firstly, take note that List<Users> _userList = new List<Users>(); is unneeded in your class. You're not using it anywhere. A List<T> structure is a good way to store multiple users - just replace T with a type that represents a user. You should change the name of your class to represent a single user (User would be a good idea here) and use a List<User> outside of the class.

Take a look at this contrived example, where user has one string property - the name of the user. It enables you to add multiple users to a list with names of your choosing and then prints each of the names in a new line. Note that I used an auto-implemented property to store the user's name.

class User
{
    public User(string name)
    {
        Name = name;
    }

    public Name { get; private set; }
}   

public static void Main()
{
    List<User> users = new List<User>();
    bool anotherUser = true;
    while (anotherUser)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Please specify a name.");
        string userName = Console.ReadLine();
        User user = new User(userName);
        users.Add(user);
        string next = Console.WriteLine("Do you want to add another user (type Y for yes)?");
        anotherUser = (next == "Y");
    }

    Console.WriteLine("\nNames of added users:");
    foreach(User u in users)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(u.Name);
    } 

    Console.ReadKey();
}    

Of course you have to expand on this answer to really get what you want. This is merely a point of reference.

Firstly, take note that List<Users> _userList = new List<Users>(); is unneeded in your class. You're not using it anywhere. A List<T> structure is a good way to store multiple users - just replace T with a type that represents a user. You should change the name of your class to represent a single user (User would be a good idea here) and use a List<User> outside of the class.

Take a look at this contrived example, where user has one string property - the name of the user. It enables you to add multiple users to a list with names of your choosing and then prints each of the names in a new line. Note that I used an auto-implemented property to store the user's name.

class User
{
    public User(string name)
    {
        Name = name;
    }

    public Name { get; private set; }
}   

public static void Main()
{
    List<User> users = new List<User>();
    bool anotherUser = true;
    while (anotherUser)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Please specify a name.");
        string userName = Console.ReadLine();
        User user = new User(userName);
        users.Add(user);
        string next = Console.WriteLine("Do you want to add another user (type Y for yes)?");
        anotherUser = (next == "Y");
    }

    Console.WriteLine("\nNames of added users:");
    foreach(User u in users)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(u.Name);
    }
    Console.ReadKey();
}    

Of course you have to expand on this answer to really get what you want. This is merely a point of reference.

Firstly, take note that List<Users> _userList = new List<Users>(); is unneeded in your class. You're not using it anywhere. A List<T> structure is a good way to store multiple users - just replace T with a type that represents a user. You should change the name of your class to represent a single user (User would be a good idea here) and use a List<User> outside of the class.

Take a look at this contrived example, where user has one string property - the name of the user. It enables you to add multiple users to a list with names of your choosing and then prints each of the names in a new line. Note that I used an auto-implemented property to store the user's name.

class User
{
    public User(string name)
    {
        Name = name;
    }

    public Name { get; private set; }
}   

public static void Main()
{
    List<User> users = new List<User>();
    bool anotherUser = true;
    while (anotherUser)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Please specify a name.");
        string userName = Console.ReadLine();
        User user = new User(userName);
        users.Add(user);
        string next = Console.WriteLine("Do you want to add another user (type Y for yes)?");
        anotherUser = (next == "Y");
    }

    Console.WriteLine("\nNames of added users:");
    foreach(User u in users)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(u.Name);
    } 

    Console.ReadKey();
}    

Of course you have to expand on this answer to really get what you want. This is merely a point of reference.

1
source | link

Firstly, take note that List<Users> _userList = new List<Users>(); is unneeded in your class. You're not using it anywhere. A List<T> structure is a good way to store multiple users - just replace T with a type that represents a user. You should change the name of your class to represent a single user (User would be a good idea here) and use a List<User> outside of the class.

Take a look at this contrived example, where user has one string property - the name of the user. It enables you to add multiple users to a list with names of your choosing and then prints each of the names in a new line. Note that I used an auto-implemented property to store the user's name.

class User
{
    public User(string name)
    {
        Name = name;
    }

    public Name { get; private set; }
}   

public static void Main()
{
    List<User> users = new List<User>();
    bool anotherUser = true;
    while (anotherUser)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Please specify a name.");
        string userName = Console.ReadLine();
        User user = new User(userName);
        users.Add(user);
        string next = Console.WriteLine("Do you want to add another user (type Y for yes)?");
        anotherUser = (next == "Y");
    }

    Console.WriteLine("\nNames of added users:");
    foreach(User u in users)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(u.Name);
    }
    Console.ReadKey();
}    

Of course you have to expand on this answer to really get what you want. This is merely a point of reference.