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I think it depends on how much seperation there is between the dots and clusters. If the distances are large and irregular, I would initially tringulatetriangulate the points, and then delete/hide all the triangles with statistically large edge lengths. The remaining sub-triangulations form clusters of arbitrary shape. Traversing the edges of these sub-triangulations yields polygons which can be used to determine which specific points lie in each cluster. The polygons can also be compared to know shapes, such as Kent Fredric's torus, as required.

IMO, grid methods are good for quick and dirty solutions, but get very hungry very quickly on sparse data. Quad trees are better, but TINs are my personal favourite for any more complex analysis.

I think it depends on how much seperation there is between the dots and clusters. If the distances are large and irregular, I would initially tringulate the points, and then delete/hide all the triangles with statistically large edge lengths. The remaining sub-triangulations form clusters of arbitrary shape. Traversing the edges of these sub-triangulations yields polygons which can be used to determine which specific points lie in each cluster. The polygons can also be compared to know shapes, such as Kent Fredric's torus, as required.

IMO, grid methods are good for quick and dirty solutions, but get very hungry very quickly on sparse data. Quad trees are better, but TINs are my personal favourite for any more complex analysis.

I think it depends on how much seperation there is between the dots and clusters. If the distances are large and irregular, I would initially triangulate the points, and then delete/hide all the triangles with statistically large edge lengths. The remaining sub-triangulations form clusters of arbitrary shape. Traversing the edges of these sub-triangulations yields polygons which can be used to determine which specific points lie in each cluster. The polygons can also be compared to know shapes, such as Kent Fredric's torus, as required.

IMO, grid methods are good for quick and dirty solutions, but get very hungry very quickly on sparse data. Quad trees are better, but TINs are my personal favourite for any more complex analysis.

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I think it depends on how much seperation there is between the dots and clusters. If the distances are large and irregular, I would initially tringulate the points, and then delete/hide all the triangles with statistically large edge lengths. The remaining sub-triangulations form clusters of arbitrary shape. Traversing the edges of these sub-triangulations yields polygons which can be used to determine which specific points lie in each cluster. The polygons can also be compared to know shapes, such as Kent Fredric's torus, as required.

IMO, grid methods are good for quick and dirty solutions, but get very hungry very quickly on sparse data. Quad trees are better, but TINs are my personal favourite for any more complex analysis.