Use Stack Overflow for Teams at work to find answers in a private and secure environment. Get your first 10 users free. Sign up.
4 added 39 characters in body
source | link

Using rowCount() isn't unsafe, but just improper.

The #1 rule when working with databases is

Always select the exact data you need.

with as less post-processing as possible.

So if you need to check whatever data check for existence, then ask your database to check and then fetch the result.

However, you have to keep in mind that there are 2 possible scenarios:

  1. In case you indeed need to check wherever something exists in a database, but don't need the data, then (assuming username has an unique index on it):

    $sql = "SELECT count(*)1 FROM users WHERE username = ?";
    $result = $db->prepare($sql);
    $result->execute(array('administrator'));
    echo $result->fetchColumn() ? 'true' : 'false';
    
  2. But often you need the data itself if it happens to be found. In this case you just select that data:

    $sql = "SELECT * FROM users WHERE username = ?";
    $result = $db->prepare($sql);
    $result->execute(array('administrator'));
    $user = $result->fetch();
    echo $user ? 'true' : 'false';
    

I am stressing on it because the wording of the other answer suggests that you have to run 2 queries: one to check the existence and one to get the data, which is a nonsense.

As of the rowCount() method - you need it too seldom to talk about.

Using rowCount() isn't unsafe, but just improper.

The #1 rule when working with databases is

Always select the exact data you need.

with as less post-processing as possible.

So if you need to whatever data check for existence, then ask your database to check and then fetch the result.

However, you have to keep in mind that there are 2 possible scenarios:

  1. In case you indeed need to check wherever something exists in a database, but don't need the data, then:

    $sql = "SELECT count(*) FROM users WHERE username = ?";
    $result = $db->prepare($sql);
    $result->execute(array('administrator'));
    echo $result->fetchColumn() ? 'true' : 'false';
    
  2. But often you need the data itself if it happens to be found. In this case you just select that data:

    $sql = "SELECT * FROM users WHERE username = ?";
    $result = $db->prepare($sql);
    $result->execute(array('administrator'));
    $user = $result->fetch();
    echo $user ? 'true' : 'false';
    

I am stressing on it because the wording of the other answer suggests that you have to run 2 queries: one to check the existence and one to get the data, which is a nonsense.

As of the rowCount() method - you need it too seldom to talk about.

Using rowCount() isn't unsafe, but just improper.

The #1 rule when working with databases is

Always select the exact data you need.

with as less post-processing as possible.

So if you need to check whatever data for existence, then ask your database to check and then fetch the result.

However, you have to keep in mind that there are 2 possible scenarios:

  1. In case you indeed need to check wherever something exists in a database, but don't need the data, then (assuming username has an unique index on it):

    $sql = "SELECT 1 FROM users WHERE username = ?";
    $result = $db->prepare($sql);
    $result->execute(array('administrator'));
    echo $result->fetchColumn() ? 'true' : 'false';
    
  2. But often you need the data itself if it happens to be found. In this case you just select that data:

    $sql = "SELECT * FROM users WHERE username = ?";
    $result = $db->prepare($sql);
    $result->execute(array('administrator'));
    $user = $result->fetch();
    echo $user ? 'true' : 'false';
    

I am stressing on it because the wording of the other answer suggests that you have to run 2 queries: one to check the existence and one to get the data, which is a nonsense.

As of the rowCount() method - you need it too seldom to talk about.

3 added 207 characters in body
source | link

Using rowCount() isn't unsafe, but just improper.

The #1 rule when working with databases is

Always select the onlyexact data you need.

In your casewith as less post-processing as possible.

So if you need to whatever data check for existence, then ask your database to check and then fetch the result.

However, you have to keep in mind that there are 2 possible scenarios:

  1. In case you indeed need to check wherever something exists in a database, but don't need the data, then:

    $sql = "SELECT count(*) FROM users WHERE username = ?";
    $result = $db->prepare($sql);
    $result->execute(array('administrator'));
    echo $result->fetchColumn() ? 'true' : 'false';
    
  2. In caseBut often you need to check the existence and then use the data, then just select that data itself if it happens to be found. In this case you just select that data:

    $sql = "SELECT * FROM users WHERE username = ?";
    $result = $db->prepare($sql);
    $result->execute(array('administrator'));
    $user = $result->fetch();
    echo $user ? 'true' : 'false';
    

I am stressing on it because the wording of the other answer suggests that you have to run 2 queries: one to check the existence and one to get the data, which is a nonsense.

As of the rowCount() method - you need it too seldom to talk about.

Using rowCount() isn't unsafe, but just improper.

The #1 rule when working with databases is

Always select the only data you need.

In your case there are 2 possible scenarios:

  1. In case you indeed need to check wherever something exists in a database, but don't need the data, then:

    $sql = "SELECT count(*) FROM users WHERE username = ?";
    $result = $db->prepare($sql);
    $result->execute(array('administrator'));
    echo $result->fetchColumn() ? 'true' : 'false';
    
  2. In case you need to check the existence and then use the data, then just select that data:

    $sql = "SELECT * FROM users WHERE username = ?";
    $result = $db->prepare($sql);
    $result->execute(array('administrator'));
    $user = $result->fetch();
    echo $user ? 'true' : 'false';
    

I am stressing on it because the wording of the other answer suggests that you have to run 2 queries: one to check the existence and one to get the data, which is a nonsense.

As of the rowCount() method - you need it too seldom to talk about.

Using rowCount() isn't unsafe, but just improper.

The #1 rule when working with databases is

Always select the exact data you need.

with as less post-processing as possible.

So if you need to whatever data check for existence, then ask your database to check and then fetch the result.

However, you have to keep in mind that there are 2 possible scenarios:

  1. In case you indeed need to check wherever something exists in a database, but don't need the data, then:

    $sql = "SELECT count(*) FROM users WHERE username = ?";
    $result = $db->prepare($sql);
    $result->execute(array('administrator'));
    echo $result->fetchColumn() ? 'true' : 'false';
    
  2. But often you need the data itself if it happens to be found. In this case you just select that data:

    $sql = "SELECT * FROM users WHERE username = ?";
    $result = $db->prepare($sql);
    $result->execute(array('administrator'));
    $user = $result->fetch();
    echo $user ? 'true' : 'false';
    

I am stressing on it because the wording of the other answer suggests that you have to run 2 queries: one to check the existence and one to get the data, which is a nonsense.

As of the rowCount() method - you need it too seldom to talk about.

2 added 667 characters in body
source | link

Using rowCount() isn't unsafe, but just improper.

The #1 rule when working with databases is

Always select the only data you need.

Therefore, following this rule, you should selectIn your case there are 2 possible scenarios:

  1. In case you indeed need to check wherever something exists in a database, but don't need the data, then:

    $sql = "SELECT count(*) FROM users WHERE username = ?";
    $result = $db->prepare($sql);
    $result->execute(array('administrator'));
    echo $result->fetchColumn() ? 'true' : 'false';
    
  2. In case you need to check the existence and then use the data, then just select that data:

    $sql = "SELECT * FROM users WHERE username = ?";
    $result = $db->prepare($sql);
    $result->execute(array('administrator'));
    $user = $result->fetch();
    echo $user ? 'true' : 'false';
    

I am stressing on it because the exact infowording of the other answer suggests that you need - whether a user exists inhave to run 2 queries: one to check the existence and one to get the data, which is a database or notnonsense.  

$sql = "SELECT count(*) FROM users WHERE username = ?";
$result = $db->prepare($sql);
$result->execute(array('administrator'));
echo $result->fetchColumn() ? 'true' : 'false';

As of the rowCount() method - you need it too seldom to talk about.

Using rowCount() isn't unsafe, but just improper.

The #1 rule when working with databases is

Always select the only data you need.

Therefore, following this rule, you should select the exact info you need - whether a user exists in a database or not.  

$sql = "SELECT count(*) FROM users WHERE username = ?";
$result = $db->prepare($sql);
$result->execute(array('administrator'));
echo $result->fetchColumn() ? 'true' : 'false';

As of the rowCount() method - you need it too seldom to talk about.

Using rowCount() isn't unsafe, but just improper.

The #1 rule when working with databases is

Always select the only data you need.

In your case there are 2 possible scenarios:

  1. In case you indeed need to check wherever something exists in a database, but don't need the data, then:

    $sql = "SELECT count(*) FROM users WHERE username = ?";
    $result = $db->prepare($sql);
    $result->execute(array('administrator'));
    echo $result->fetchColumn() ? 'true' : 'false';
    
  2. In case you need to check the existence and then use the data, then just select that data:

    $sql = "SELECT * FROM users WHERE username = ?";
    $result = $db->prepare($sql);
    $result->execute(array('administrator'));
    $user = $result->fetch();
    echo $user ? 'true' : 'false';
    

I am stressing on it because the wording of the other answer suggests that you have to run 2 queries: one to check the existence and one to get the data, which is a nonsense.

As of the rowCount() method - you need it too seldom to talk about.

1
source | link