8 add caret explanation
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What version of Git are you using?

Reverting multiple commits in only supported in Git1.7.2+: see "Rollback to an old commit using revert multiple times." for more details.
The current git revert man page is only for the current Git version (1.7.4+).


As the OP Alex Spurling reports in the comments:

Upgrading to 1.7.4 works fine.
To answer my own question, this is the syntax I was looking for:

git revert B^..D 

B^ means "the first parent commit of B": that allows to include B in the revert.
See "git rev-parse SPECIFYING REVISIONS section" which include the <rev>^, e.g. HEAD^ syntax: see more at "What does the caret (^) character mean?")

Note that each reverted commit is committed separately.

Henrik N clarifies in the comments:

git revert OLDER_COMMIT^..NEWER_COMMIT

As shown below, you can revert without committing right away:

git revert -n OLDER_COMMIT^..NEWER_COMMIT
git commit -m "revert OLDER_COMMIT to NEWER_COMMIT"

What version of Git are you using?

Reverting multiple commits in only supported in Git1.7.2+: see "Rollback to an old commit using revert multiple times." for more details.
The current git revert man page is only for the current Git version (1.7.4+).


As the OP Alex Spurling reports in the comments:

Upgrading to 1.7.4 works fine.
To answer my own question, this is the syntax I was looking for:

git revert B^..D 

Note that each reverted commit is committed separately.

Henrik N clarifies in the comments:

git revert OLDER_COMMIT^..NEWER_COMMIT

As shown below, you can revert without committing right away:

git revert -n OLDER_COMMIT^..NEWER_COMMIT
git commit -m "revert OLDER_COMMIT to NEWER_COMMIT"

What version of Git are you using?

Reverting multiple commits in only supported in Git1.7.2+: see "Rollback to an old commit using revert multiple times." for more details.
The current git revert man page is only for the current Git version (1.7.4+).


As the OP Alex Spurling reports in the comments:

Upgrading to 1.7.4 works fine.
To answer my own question, this is the syntax I was looking for:

git revert B^..D 

B^ means "the first parent commit of B": that allows to include B in the revert.
See "git rev-parse SPECIFYING REVISIONS section" which include the <rev>^, e.g. HEAD^ syntax: see more at "What does the caret (^) character mean?")

Note that each reverted commit is committed separately.

Henrik N clarifies in the comments:

git revert OLDER_COMMIT^..NEWER_COMMIT

As shown below, you can revert without committing right away:

git revert -n OLDER_COMMIT^..NEWER_COMMIT
git commit -m "revert OLDER_COMMIT to NEWER_COMMIT"
7 replaced http://stackoverflow.com/ with https://stackoverflow.com/
source | link

What version of Git are you using?

Reverting multiple commits in only supported in Git1.7.2+: see "Rollback to an old commit using revert multiple times.Rollback to an old commit using revert multiple times." for more details.
The current git revert man page is only for the current Git version (1.7.4+).


As the OP Alex SpurlingOP Alex Spurling reports in the comments:

Upgrading to 1.7.4 works fine.
To answer my own question, this is the syntax I was looking for:

git revert B^..D 

Note that each reverted commit is committed separately.

Henrik NHenrik N clarifies in the commentsthe comments:

git revert OLDER_COMMIT^..NEWER_COMMIT

As shown below, you can revert without committing right away:

git revert -n OLDER_COMMIT^..NEWER_COMMIT
git commit -m "revert OLDER_COMMIT to NEWER_COMMIT"

What version of Git are you using?

Reverting multiple commits in only supported in Git1.7.2+: see "Rollback to an old commit using revert multiple times." for more details.
The current git revert man page is only for the current Git version (1.7.4+).


As the OP Alex Spurling reports in the comments:

Upgrading to 1.7.4 works fine.
To answer my own question, this is the syntax I was looking for:

git revert B^..D 

Note that each reverted commit is committed separately.

Henrik N clarifies in the comments:

git revert OLDER_COMMIT^..NEWER_COMMIT

As shown below, you can revert without committing right away:

git revert -n OLDER_COMMIT^..NEWER_COMMIT
git commit -m "revert OLDER_COMMIT to NEWER_COMMIT"

What version of Git are you using?

Reverting multiple commits in only supported in Git1.7.2+: see "Rollback to an old commit using revert multiple times." for more details.
The current git revert man page is only for the current Git version (1.7.4+).


As the OP Alex Spurling reports in the comments:

Upgrading to 1.7.4 works fine.
To answer my own question, this is the syntax I was looking for:

git revert B^..D 

Note that each reverted commit is committed separately.

Henrik N clarifies in the comments:

git revert OLDER_COMMIT^..NEWER_COMMIT

As shown below, you can revert without committing right away:

git revert -n OLDER_COMMIT^..NEWER_COMMIT
git commit -m "revert OLDER_COMMIT to NEWER_COMMIT"
6 Fixed command - option order for git revert
source | link

What version of Git are you using?

Reverting multiple commits in only supported in Git1.7.2+: see "Rollback to an old commit using revert multiple times." for more details.
The current git revert man page is only for the current Git version (1.7.4+).


As the OP Alex Spurling reports in the comments:

Upgrading to 1.7.4 works fine.
To answer my own question, this is the syntax I was looking for:

git revert B^..D 

Note that each reverted commit is committed separately.

Henrik N clarifies in the comments:

git revert OLDER_COMMIT^..NEWER_COMMIT

As shown below, you can revert without committing right away:

git revert -n revert OLDER_COMMIT^..NEWER_COMMIT
git commit -m "revert OLDER_COMMIT to NEWER_COMMIT"

What version of Git are you using?

Reverting multiple commits in only supported in Git1.7.2+: see "Rollback to an old commit using revert multiple times." for more details.
The current git revert man page is only for the current Git version (1.7.4+).


As the OP Alex Spurling reports in the comments:

Upgrading to 1.7.4 works fine.
To answer my own question, this is the syntax I was looking for:

git revert B^..D 

Note that each reverted commit is committed separately.

Henrik N clarifies in the comments:

git revert OLDER_COMMIT^..NEWER_COMMIT

As shown below, you can revert without committing right away:

git -n revert OLDER_COMMIT^..NEWER_COMMIT
git commit -m "revert OLDER_COMMIT to NEWER_COMMIT"

What version of Git are you using?

Reverting multiple commits in only supported in Git1.7.2+: see "Rollback to an old commit using revert multiple times." for more details.
The current git revert man page is only for the current Git version (1.7.4+).


As the OP Alex Spurling reports in the comments:

Upgrading to 1.7.4 works fine.
To answer my own question, this is the syntax I was looking for:

git revert B^..D 

Note that each reverted commit is committed separately.

Henrik N clarifies in the comments:

git revert OLDER_COMMIT^..NEWER_COMMIT

As shown below, you can revert without committing right away:

git revert -n OLDER_COMMIT^..NEWER_COMMIT
git commit -m "revert OLDER_COMMIT to NEWER_COMMIT"
5 add -n
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4 add order from Henrik's comment
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3 added 55 characters in body
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2 include OP's conclusion
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1
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