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Here are two pertinent functions -- one responsible for adding commands to the queue (addCommand), and one responsible for serializing and then sending them to the server (fireRequest):

CommandQueue.prototype.addCommand = function(command)
{ 
    if (this.isCommand(command))
    {
        this.queue.append(command,true);
    }
}

CommandQueue.prototype.fireRequest = function()
{
    // Send request to server
    if (this.queued.length == 0)
    { 
        return; 
    }

    var data="data=";

    for (var i = 0; i < this.queued.length; i++)
    { 
        var cmd = this.queued[i]; 
        if (this.isCommand(cmd))
        {
            data += cmd.toRequestString(); 
            this.sent[cmd.id]=cmd;id] = cmd;

            // ... and then send the contents of data in a POST request
        }
    }
}
CommandQueue.prototype.addCommand = function(command)
{ 
    if (this.isCommand(command))
    {
        this.queue.append(command,true);
    }
}

CommandQueue.prototype.fireRequest = function()
{
    // Send request to server
    if (this.queued.length == 0)
    { 
        return; 
    }

    var data="data=";

    for (var i = 0; i < this.queued.length; i++)
    { 
        var cmd = this.queued[i]; 
        if (this.isCommand(cmd))
        {
            data += cmd.toRequestString(); 
            this.sent[cmd.id]=cmd;
        }
    }
}

Here are two pertinent functions -- one responsible for adding commands to the queue (addCommand), and one responsible for serializing and then sending them to the server (fireRequest):

CommandQueue.prototype.addCommand = function(command)
{ 
    if (this.isCommand(command))
    {
        this.queue.append(command,true);
    }
}

CommandQueue.prototype.fireRequest = function()
{
    if (this.queued.length == 0)
    { 
        return; 
    }

    var data="data=";

    for (var i = 0; i < this.queued.length; i++)
    { 
        var cmd = this.queued[i]; 
        if (this.isCommand(cmd))
        {
            data += cmd.toRequestString(); 
            this.sent[cmd.id] = cmd;

            // ... and then send the contents of data in a POST request
        }
    }
}
3 added 1560 characters in body
source | link

Not at all -- I think the REST equivalent is (or at least one solution is) almost exactly that -- a specialized interface designed accommodate an operation required by the client.

I'm reminded of a pattern mentioned in Crane and Pascarello's book Ajax in Action (an excellent book, by the way -- highly recommended) in which they illustrate implementing a CommandQueue sort of object whose job it is to queue up requests into batches and then post them to the server periodically.

The object, if I remember correctly, essentially just held an array of "commands" -- e.g., to extend your example, each one a record containing a "markAsRead" command, a "messageId" and maybe a reference to a callback/handler function -- and then according to some schedule, or on some user action, the command object would be serialized and posted to the server, and the client would handle the consequent post-processing.

I don't happen to have the details handy, but it sounds like a command queue of this sort would be one way to handle your problem; it'd reduce the overall chattiness substantially, and it'd abstract the server-side interface in a way you might find more flexible down the road.


Update: Aha! I've found a snip from that very book online, complete with code samples (although I still suggest picking up the actual book!). Have a look here, beginning with section 5.5.3:

This is easy to code but can result in a lot of very small bits of traffic to the server, which is inefficient and potentially confusing. If we want to control our traffic, we can capture these updates and queue them locally and then send them to the server in batches at our leisure. A simple update queue implemented in JavaScript is shown in listing 5.13. [...]

The queue maintains two arrays. queued is a numerically indexed array, to which new updates are appended. sent is an associative array, containing those updates that have been sent to the server but that are awaiting a reply.

CommandQueue.prototype.addCommand = function(command)
{ 
    if (this.isCommand(command))
    {
        this.queue.append(command,true);
    }
}

CommandQueue.prototype.fireRequest = function()
{
    // Send request to server
    if (this.queued.length == 0)
    { 
        return; 
    }

    var data="data=";

    for (var i = 0; i < this.queued.length; i++)
    { 
        var cmd = this.queued[i]; 
        if (this.isCommand(cmd))
        {
            data += cmd.toRequestString(); 
            this.sent[cmd.id]=cmd;
        }
    }
}

That ought to get you going. Good luck!

Not at all -- I think the REST equivalent is (or at least one solution is) almost exactly that -- a specialized interface designed accommodate an operation required by the client.

I'm reminded of a pattern mentioned in Crane and Pascarello's book Ajax in Action (an excellent book, by the way -- highly recommended) in which they illustrate implementing a CommandQueue sort of object whose job it is to queue up requests into batches and then post them to the server periodically.

The object, if I remember correctly, essentially just held an array of "commands" -- e.g., to extend your example, each one a record containing a "markAsRead" command, a "messageId" and maybe a reference to a callback/handler function -- and then according to some schedule, or on some user action, the command object would be serialized and posted to the server, and the client would handle the consequent post-processing.

I don't happen to have the details handy, but it sounds like a command queue of this sort would be one way to handle your problem; it'd reduce the overall chattiness substantially, and it'd abstract the server-side interface in a way you might find more flexible down the road.

Not at all -- I think the REST equivalent is (or at least one solution is) almost exactly that -- a specialized interface designed accommodate an operation required by the client.

I'm reminded of a pattern mentioned in Crane and Pascarello's book Ajax in Action (an excellent book, by the way -- highly recommended) in which they illustrate implementing a CommandQueue sort of object whose job it is to queue up requests into batches and then post them to the server periodically.

The object, if I remember correctly, essentially just held an array of "commands" -- e.g., to extend your example, each one a record containing a "markAsRead" command, a "messageId" and maybe a reference to a callback/handler function -- and then according to some schedule, or on some user action, the command object would be serialized and posted to the server, and the client would handle the consequent post-processing.

I don't happen to have the details handy, but it sounds like a command queue of this sort would be one way to handle your problem; it'd reduce the overall chattiness substantially, and it'd abstract the server-side interface in a way you might find more flexible down the road.


Update: Aha! I've found a snip from that very book online, complete with code samples (although I still suggest picking up the actual book!). Have a look here, beginning with section 5.5.3:

This is easy to code but can result in a lot of very small bits of traffic to the server, which is inefficient and potentially confusing. If we want to control our traffic, we can capture these updates and queue them locally and then send them to the server in batches at our leisure. A simple update queue implemented in JavaScript is shown in listing 5.13. [...]

The queue maintains two arrays. queued is a numerically indexed array, to which new updates are appended. sent is an associative array, containing those updates that have been sent to the server but that are awaiting a reply.

CommandQueue.prototype.addCommand = function(command)
{ 
    if (this.isCommand(command))
    {
        this.queue.append(command,true);
    }
}

CommandQueue.prototype.fireRequest = function()
{
    // Send request to server
    if (this.queued.length == 0)
    { 
        return; 
    }

    var data="data=";

    for (var i = 0; i < this.queued.length; i++)
    { 
        var cmd = this.queued[i]; 
        if (this.isCommand(cmd))
        {
            data += cmd.toRequestString(); 
            this.sent[cmd.id]=cmd;
        }
    }
}

That ought to get you going. Good luck!

2 added 207 characters in body
source | link

Not at all -- I think the REST equivalent is (or at least one solution is) almost exactly that -- a specialized interface designed accommodate an operation required by the client.

I'm reminded of a pattern mentioned in Crane and Pascarello's book Ajax in Action (an excellent book, by the way -- highly recommended) in which they illustrate implementing a CommandQueueCommandQueue sort of object whose job it is to queue up requests into batches and then post them to the server periodically.

The object, if I remember correctly, essentially just held an array of "commands" -- e.g., to extend your example, each one a record containing a "markAsRead" command, a "messageId" and maybe a reference to a callback/handler function -- and then according to some schedule, or on some user action, the command object would be serialized and posted to the server, and the client would handle the consequent post-processing. I

I don't happen to have the details handy, but it sounds like a command queue of this sort would be one way to handle your problemproblem; it'd reduce the overall chattiness substantially, and it'd abstract the server-side interface in a way you might find more flexible down the road.

Not at all -- I think the REST equivalent is (or at least one solution is) almost exactly that -- a specialized interface designed accommodate an operation required by the client.

I'm reminded of a pattern mentioned in Crane and Pascarello's book Ajax in Action (an excellent book, by the way -- highly recommended) in which they illustrate implementing a CommandQueue sort of object whose job it is to queue up requests into batches and then post them to the server periodically.

The object, if I remember correctly, essentially just held an array of "commands" -- e.g., to extend your example, each one a record containing a "markAsRead" command, a "messageId" and maybe a reference to a callback/handler function -- and then according to some schedule, or on some user action, the command object would be serialized and posted to the server, and the client would handle the post-processing. I don't have the details handy, but it sounds like a command queue would be one way to handle your problem.

Not at all -- I think the REST equivalent is (or at least one solution is) almost exactly that -- a specialized interface designed accommodate an operation required by the client.

I'm reminded of a pattern mentioned in Crane and Pascarello's book Ajax in Action (an excellent book, by the way -- highly recommended) in which they illustrate implementing a CommandQueue sort of object whose job it is to queue up requests into batches and then post them to the server periodically.

The object, if I remember correctly, essentially just held an array of "commands" -- e.g., to extend your example, each one a record containing a "markAsRead" command, a "messageId" and maybe a reference to a callback/handler function -- and then according to some schedule, or on some user action, the command object would be serialized and posted to the server, and the client would handle the consequent post-processing.

I don't happen to have the details handy, but it sounds like a command queue of this sort would be one way to handle your problem; it'd reduce the overall chattiness substantially, and it'd abstract the server-side interface in a way you might find more flexible down the road.

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