3 use a pointer to va_list
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#include <stdarg.h>
#include <stdio.h>

void vlist_one_ldouble(va_list args*pargs) {
    long double value;

    value = va_arg(args*pargs, long double);
    printf(" %Lf", value);
}

void vlist_ldouble(int count, va_list args*pargs) {
    printf("Now printing %d long doubles:\n", count);

    for (int i=0; i<count; i++)
        vlist_one_ldouble(argspargs);

    printf("\n");
}

void list_ldouble(int count, ...) {
    va_list args;
    va_start(args, count);

    vlist_ldouble(count, args&args);

    va_end(args);
    return;
}

int main(void) {
    long double a = 1.1, b=2.2, c=3.3;

    list_ldouble(3, a, b, c);
    list_ldouble(4, 1.1L, 2.2L, 3.3L, 4.4L);

    return 0;
}

There are a few differences here, as I've passed the va_list, not a pointer to it. But aA very important thing which we can't check without your full code is that you have to be sure that you're actually passing long doubles. Here I'm doing it two ways: firstly, with long double variables; secondly with long double literals.

#include <stdarg.h>
#include <stdio.h>

void vlist_one_ldouble(va_list args) {
    long double value;

    value = va_arg(args, long double);
    printf(" %Lf", value);
}

void vlist_ldouble(int count, va_list args) {
    printf("Now printing %d long doubles:\n", count);

    for (int i=0; i<count; i++)
        vlist_one_ldouble(args);

    printf("\n");
}

void list_ldouble(int count, ...) {
    va_list args;
    va_start(args, count);

    vlist_ldouble(count, args);

    va_end(args);
    return;
}

int main(void) {
    long double a = 1.1, b=2.2, c=3.3;

    list_ldouble(3, a, b, c);
    list_ldouble(4, 1.1L, 2.2L, 3.3L, 4.4L);

    return 0;
}

There are a few differences here, as I've passed the va_list, not a pointer to it. But a very important thing which we can't check without your full code is that you have to be sure that you're actually passing long doubles. Here I'm doing it two ways: firstly, with long double variables; secondly with long double literals.

#include <stdarg.h>
#include <stdio.h>

void vlist_one_ldouble(va_list *pargs) {
    long double value;

    value = va_arg(*pargs, long double);
    printf(" %Lf", value);
}

void vlist_ldouble(int count, va_list *pargs) {
    printf("Now printing %d long doubles:\n", count);

    for (int i=0; i<count; i++)
        vlist_one_ldouble(pargs);

    printf("\n");
}

void list_ldouble(int count, ...) {
    va_list args;
    va_start(args, count);

    vlist_ldouble(count, &args);

    va_end(args);
    return;
}

int main(void) {
    long double a = 1.1, b=2.2, c=3.3;

    list_ldouble(3, a, b, c);
    list_ldouble(4, 1.1L, 2.2L, 3.3L, 4.4L);

    return 0;
}

A very important thing which we can't check without your full code is that you have to be sure that you're actually passing long doubles. Here I'm doing it two ways: firstly, with long double variables; secondly with long double literals.

2 more details on typed literals
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The L suffix here is an example of a "typed literal". When you specify the actual value of a variable in your source code (e.g. 1 or 3.14 or 'b' or "foo") that's a literal. Usually you don't have to specify explicitly what the type of the literal is, as the compiler can do any necessary conversions. For floating point literals, the standard says this:

An unsuffixed floating constant has type double. If suffixed by the letter f or F, it has type float. If suffixed by the letter l or L, it has type long double.

If a standard function with a prototype is called with a literal value, say func(1.2) then the compiler will know whether func() is expecting a float, a double or a long double and pass the appropriate type to the function. But with variable length argument list functions, there's no prototype to work from, so the compiler works from the type of the value you're passing. If you're passing 1.2, it will pass it as a double. If you want to pass a long double, you have to specify that your 1.2 is actually a long double, and that's what the L is for. If you end up passing a double, but expecting a long double, you'll not get the value you're expecting.

I can't find an ideal reference for this, but this page isn't bad, and these pages are good, but are about C++, rather than C.

If this doesn't answer your problem, post a complete, compilable program which isn't doing what you expect.

If this doesn't answer your problem, post a complete, compilable program which isn't doing what you expect.

The L suffix here is an example of a "typed literal". When you specify the actual value of a variable in your source code (e.g. 1 or 3.14 or 'b' or "foo") that's a literal. Usually you don't have to specify explicitly what the type of the literal is, as the compiler can do any necessary conversions. For floating point literals, the standard says this:

An unsuffixed floating constant has type double. If suffixed by the letter f or F, it has type float. If suffixed by the letter l or L, it has type long double.

If a standard function with a prototype is called with a literal value, say func(1.2) then the compiler will know whether func() is expecting a float, a double or a long double and pass the appropriate type to the function. But with variable length argument list functions, there's no prototype to work from, so the compiler works from the type of the value you're passing. If you're passing 1.2, it will pass it as a double. If you want to pass a long double, you have to specify that your 1.2 is actually a long double, and that's what the L is for. If you end up passing a double, but expecting a long double, you'll not get the value you're expecting.

I can't find an ideal reference for this, but this page isn't bad, and these pages are good, but are about C++, rather than C.

If this doesn't answer your problem, post a complete, compilable program which isn't doing what you expect.

1
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You still haven't shown us the complete, compilable code you are using, so it's difficult to see what you're doing wrong. Here's some complete code which illustrates what you're trying to do.

#include <stdarg.h>
#include <stdio.h>

void vlist_one_ldouble(va_list args) {
    long double value;

    value = va_arg(args, long double);
    printf(" %Lf", value);
}

void vlist_ldouble(int count, va_list args) {
    printf("Now printing %d long doubles:\n", count);

    for (int i=0; i<count; i++)
        vlist_one_ldouble(args);

    printf("\n");
}

void list_ldouble(int count, ...) {
    va_list args;
    va_start(args, count);

    vlist_ldouble(count, args);

    va_end(args);
    return;
}

int main(void) {
    long double a = 1.1, b=2.2, c=3.3;

    list_ldouble(3, a, b, c);
    list_ldouble(4, 1.1L, 2.2L, 3.3L, 4.4L);

    return 0;
}

There are a few differences here, as I've passed the va_list, not a pointer to it. But a very important thing which we can't check without your full code is that you have to be sure that you're actually passing long doubles. Here I'm doing it two ways: firstly, with long double variables; secondly with long double literals.

If this doesn't answer your problem, post a complete, compilable program which isn't doing what you expect.