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In digging through the python Counter class in collections, I found something I thought was peculiar: They don't explicitly use the self argument in the __init__ functionfunction's arguments.

See code below (copied directly without the docstring):

class Counter(dict):
    def __init__(*args, **kwds):
        if not args:
            raise TypeError("descriptor '__init__' of 'Counter' object "
                            "needs an argument")
        self, *args = args
        if len(args) > 1:
            raise TypeError('expected at most 1 argments, got %d' % len(args))
        super(Counter, self).__init__()
        self.update(*args, **kwds)

Later in this same class, the update and subtract methods are also defined this same way.

Before you point me to questions about how self works in classes, I will note that I don't believe this is a duplicate question. I understand how self works typically and that self is not a keyword (just standard practice) etc. I also understand that this code works (I'm not questioning the validity of the * unpack/explode/starred-expressions syntax)

My question is more related to why...

  • Why would one implement the __init__ and other normal (non-@static/@class methods) of a class like this and in what circumstances should I consider using this in the future?
  • Why are only specific methods on the same class implemented like this?
  • Under what circumstance would these methods be called without any args (if any), triggering the first TypeError?
  • In what circumstances would these methods be called with self filled in manually (e.g. Counter.__init__(some_counter))? Or other examples?

I have to think that it has something to do with the TypeError("descriptor...").

In digging through the python Counter class in collections, I found something I thought was peculiar: They don't explicitly use the self argument in the __init__ function.

See code below (copied directly without the docstring):

class Counter(dict):
    def __init__(*args, **kwds):
        if not args:
            raise TypeError("descriptor '__init__' of 'Counter' object "
                            "needs an argument")
        self, *args = args
        if len(args) > 1:
            raise TypeError('expected at most 1 argments, got %d' % len(args))
        super(Counter, self).__init__()
        self.update(*args, **kwds)

Later in this same class, the update and subtract methods are also defined this same way.

Before you point me to questions about how self works in classes, I will note that I don't believe this is a duplicate question. I understand how self works typically and that self is not a keyword (just standard practice) etc. I also understand that this code works (I'm not questioning the validity of the * unpack/explode/starred-expressions syntax)

My question is more related to why...

  • Why would one implement the __init__ and other normal (non-@static/@class methods) of a class like this and in what circumstances should I consider using this in the future?
  • Why are only specific methods on the same class implemented like this?
  • Under what circumstance would these methods be called without any args (if any), triggering the first TypeError?
  • In what circumstances would these methods be called with self filled in manually (e.g. Counter.__init__(some_counter))? Or other examples?

I have to think that it has something to do with the TypeError("descriptor...").

In digging through the python Counter class in collections, I found something I thought was peculiar: They don't explicitly use the self argument in the __init__ function's arguments.

See code below (copied directly without the docstring):

class Counter(dict):
    def __init__(*args, **kwds):
        if not args:
            raise TypeError("descriptor '__init__' of 'Counter' object "
                            "needs an argument")
        self, *args = args
        if len(args) > 1:
            raise TypeError('expected at most 1 argments, got %d' % len(args))
        super(Counter, self).__init__()
        self.update(*args, **kwds)

Later in this same class, the update and subtract methods are also defined this same way.

Before you point me to questions about how self works in classes, I will note that I don't believe this is a duplicate question. I understand how self works typically and that self is not a keyword (just standard practice) etc. I also understand that this code works (I'm not questioning the validity of the * unpack/explode/starred-expressions syntax)

My question is more related to why...

  • Why would one implement the __init__ and other normal (non-@static/@class methods) of a class like this and in what circumstances should I consider using this in the future?
  • Why are only specific methods on the same class implemented like this?
  • Under what circumstance would these methods be called without any args (if any), triggering the first TypeError?
  • In what circumstances would these methods be called with self filled in manually (e.g. Counter.__init__(some_counter))? Or other examples?

I have to think that it has something to do with the TypeError("descriptor...").

3 edited title
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__init__ function definition without self argument

2 added 1 character in body
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In digging through the python Counter class in collections, I found something I thought was peculiar: They don't explicitly use the self argument in the __init__ function.

See code below (copied directly without the docstring):

class Counter(dict):
    def __init__(*args, **kwds):
        if not args:
            raise TypeError("descriptor '__init__' of 'Counter'Counter' object "
                            "needs an argument")
        self, *args = args
        if len(args) > 1:
            raise TypeError('expected at most 1 argments, got %d' % len(args))
        super(Counter, self).__init__()
        self.update(*args, **kwds)

Later in this same class, the update and subtract methods are also defined this same way.

Before you point me to questions about how self works in classes, I will note that I don't believe this is a duplicate question. I understand how self works typically and that self is not a keyword (just standard practice) etc. I also understand that this code works (I'm not questioning the validity of the * unpack/explode/starred-expressions syntax)

My question is more related to why...

  • Why would one implement the __init__ and other normal (non-@static/@class methods) of a class like this and in what circumstances should I consider using this in the future?
  • Why are only specific methods on the same class implemented like this?
  • Under what circumstance would these methods be called without any args (if any), triggering the first TypeError?
  • In what circumstances would these methods be called with self filled in manually (e.g. Counter.__init__(some_counter))? Or other examples?

I have to think that it has something to do with the TypeError("descriptor...").

In digging through the python Counter class in collections, I found something I thought was peculiar: They don't explicitly use the self argument in the __init__ function.

See code below (copied directly without the docstring):

class Counter(dict):
    def __init__(*args, **kwds):
        if not args:
            raise TypeError("descriptor '__init__' of 'Counter object "
                            "needs an argument")
        self, *args = args
        if len(args) > 1:
            raise TypeError('expected at most 1 argments, got %d' % len(args))
        super(Counter, self).__init__()
        self.update(*args, **kwds)

Later in this same class, the update and subtract methods are also defined this same way.

Before you point me to questions about how self works in classes, I will note that I don't believe this is a duplicate question. I understand how self works typically and that self is not a keyword (just standard practice) etc. I also understand that this code works (I'm not questioning the validity of the * unpack/explode/starred-expressions syntax)

My question is more related to why...

  • Why would one implement the __init__ and other normal (non-@static/@class methods) of a class like this and in what circumstances should I consider using this in the future?
  • Why are only specific methods on the same class implemented like this?
  • Under what circumstance would these methods be called without any args (if any), triggering the first TypeError?
  • In what circumstances would these methods be called with self filled in manually (e.g. Counter.__init__(some_counter))? Or other examples?

I have to think that it has something to do with the TypeError("descriptor...").

In digging through the python Counter class in collections, I found something I thought was peculiar: They don't explicitly use the self argument in the __init__ function.

See code below (copied directly without the docstring):

class Counter(dict):
    def __init__(*args, **kwds):
        if not args:
            raise TypeError("descriptor '__init__' of 'Counter' object "
                            "needs an argument")
        self, *args = args
        if len(args) > 1:
            raise TypeError('expected at most 1 argments, got %d' % len(args))
        super(Counter, self).__init__()
        self.update(*args, **kwds)

Later in this same class, the update and subtract methods are also defined this same way.

Before you point me to questions about how self works in classes, I will note that I don't believe this is a duplicate question. I understand how self works typically and that self is not a keyword (just standard practice) etc. I also understand that this code works (I'm not questioning the validity of the * unpack/explode/starred-expressions syntax)

My question is more related to why...

  • Why would one implement the __init__ and other normal (non-@static/@class methods) of a class like this and in what circumstances should I consider using this in the future?
  • Why are only specific methods on the same class implemented like this?
  • Under what circumstance would these methods be called without any args (if any), triggering the first TypeError?
  • In what circumstances would these methods be called with self filled in manually (e.g. Counter.__init__(some_counter))? Or other examples?

I have to think that it has something to do with the TypeError("descriptor...").

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source | link