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A clear case forIn short, the usepurpose of composite keys is when you have data that belongs to use the database to enforce one or more business rules. In other words: protect the integrity of your data. 

Ex., suppose that you You have a list of parts that you buy from suppliers. You could could create your supplier and parts table like such:

SUPPLIER
SupplierId
SupplierName

PART
PartId
PartName
SupplierId

Uh oh. The parts table allows for duplicate data. Since you used a surrogate key that was autogenerated, you're not enforcing the fact that a part from a supplier should only be entered once. Instead, you should create the PART table like such:

PART
SupplierId
SupplierPartId
PartName

YourIn this example, your parts "belong"come from specific suppliers and you want to a given supplier, therefore,enforce the "business rule" is that you shouldrule: "A single supplier can only havesupply a single part for a single supplieronce" in the PARTS table. Hence, the composite key. The point is that the database enforces the business ruleYour composite key prevents accidental duplicate entry of a part.

You can always leave business rules out of your database and leave them to your application. There are a number of reasons why you don't want to do this (more than one app will eventually use, but by keeping the rule in the database, harder to enforce, etc. (via a composite key)

As an aside, I would suggest that you never post a comment to a forum on which Joe Celko posts. Joe will quickly, and mercilesslyensure that the business rule is enforced everywhere, inform you of how much longerespecially if you should work inever decide to allow multiple applications to access the database industrydata. 

A clear case for the use of composite keys is when you have data that belongs to other data. Ex., suppose that you have a list of parts that you buy from suppliers. You could could create your supplier and parts table like such:

SUPPLIER
SupplierId
SupplierName

PART
PartId
PartName
SupplierId

Uh oh. The parts table allows for duplicate data. Since you used a surrogate key that was autogenerated, you're not enforcing the fact that a part from a supplier should only be entered once. Instead, you should create the PART table like such:

PART
SupplierId
SupplierPartId
PartName

Your parts "belong" to a given supplier, therefore, the "business rule" is that you should only have a single part for a single supplier. Hence, the composite key. The point is that the database enforces the business rule.

You can always leave business rules out of your database and leave them to your application. There are a number of reasons why you don't want to do this (more than one app will eventually use the database, harder to enforce, etc.)

As an aside, I would suggest that you never post a comment to a forum on which Joe Celko posts. Joe will quickly, and mercilessly, inform you of how much longer you should work in the database industry.

In short, the purpose of composite keys is to use the database to enforce one or more business rules. In other words: protect the integrity of your data. 

Ex. You have a list of parts that you buy from suppliers. You could could create your supplier and parts table like such:

SUPPLIER
SupplierId
SupplierName

PART
PartId
PartName
SupplierId

Uh oh. The parts table allows for duplicate data. Since you used a surrogate key that was autogenerated, you're not enforcing the fact that a part from a supplier should only be entered once. Instead, you should create the PART table like such:

PART
SupplierId
SupplierPartId
PartName

In this example, your parts come from specific suppliers and you want to enforce the rule: "A single supplier can only supply a single part once" in the PARTS table. Hence, the composite key. Your composite key prevents accidental duplicate entry of a part.

You can always leave business rules out of your database and leave them to your application, but by keeping the rule in the database (via a composite key), you ensure that the business rule is enforced everywhere, especially if you should ever decide to allow multiple applications to access the data. 

2 added 47 characters in body
source | link

A clear case for the use of composite keys is when you have data that belongs to other data. Ex., suppose that you have a list of parts that you buy from suppliers. You could could create your supplier and parts table like such:

SUPPLIER
SupplierId
SupplierName

PART
PartId
PartName
SupplierId

Uh oh. The parts table allows for duplicate data. Since you used a surrogate key that was autogenerated, you're not enforcing the fact that a part from a supplier should only be entered once. Instead, you should create the PART table like such:

PART
SupplierId
SupplierPartId
PartName

Your parts "belong" to a given supplier, therefore, the "business rule" is that you should only have a single part for a single supplier. Hence, the composite key. The point is that the database enforces the business rule.

You can always leave business rules out of your database and leave them to your application. That assumes,There are a number of course, that your databasereasons why you don't want to do this (more than one app will only be accessed by a single applicationeventually use the database, harder to enforce, etc.)

As an aside, I would suggest that you never post a comment to a forum on which Joe Celko posts. Joe will quickly, and mercilessly, inform you of how much longer you should work in the database industry.

A clear case for the use of composite keys is when you have data that belongs to other data. Ex., suppose that you have a list of parts that you buy from suppliers. You could could create your supplier and parts table like such:

SUPPLIER
SupplierId
SupplierName

PART
PartId
PartName
SupplierId

Uh oh. The parts table allows for duplicate data. Since you used a surrogate key that was autogenerated, you're not enforcing the fact that a part from a supplier should only be entered once. Instead, you should create the PART table like such:

PART
SupplierId
SupplierPartId
PartName

Your parts "belong" to a given supplier, therefore, the "business rule" is that you should only have a single part for a single supplier. Hence, the composite key. The point is that the database enforces the business rule.

You can always leave business rules out of your database and leave them to your application. That assumes, of course, that your database will only be accessed by a single application.

As an aside, I would suggest that you never post a comment to a forum on which Joe Celko posts. Joe will quickly, and mercilessly, inform you of how much longer you should work in the database industry.

A clear case for the use of composite keys is when you have data that belongs to other data. Ex., suppose that you have a list of parts that you buy from suppliers. You could could create your supplier and parts table like such:

SUPPLIER
SupplierId
SupplierName

PART
PartId
PartName
SupplierId

Uh oh. The parts table allows for duplicate data. Since you used a surrogate key that was autogenerated, you're not enforcing the fact that a part from a supplier should only be entered once. Instead, you should create the PART table like such:

PART
SupplierId
SupplierPartId
PartName

Your parts "belong" to a given supplier, therefore, the "business rule" is that you should only have a single part for a single supplier. Hence, the composite key. The point is that the database enforces the business rule.

You can always leave business rules out of your database and leave them to your application. There are a number of reasons why you don't want to do this (more than one app will eventually use the database, harder to enforce, etc.)

As an aside, I would suggest that you never post a comment to a forum on which Joe Celko posts. Joe will quickly, and mercilessly, inform you of how much longer you should work in the database industry.

1
source | link

A clear case for the use of composite keys is when you have data that belongs to other data. Ex., suppose that you have a list of parts that you buy from suppliers. You could could create your supplier and parts table like such:

SUPPLIER
SupplierId
SupplierName

PART
PartId
PartName
SupplierId

Uh oh. The parts table allows for duplicate data. Since you used a surrogate key that was autogenerated, you're not enforcing the fact that a part from a supplier should only be entered once. Instead, you should create the PART table like such:

PART
SupplierId
SupplierPartId
PartName

Your parts "belong" to a given supplier, therefore, the "business rule" is that you should only have a single part for a single supplier. Hence, the composite key. The point is that the database enforces the business rule.

You can always leave business rules out of your database and leave them to your application. That assumes, of course, that your database will only be accessed by a single application.

As an aside, I would suggest that you never post a comment to a forum on which Joe Celko posts. Joe will quickly, and mercilessly, inform you of how much longer you should work in the database industry.