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Sanjeev
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  1. The term "reference" is a overloaded with two separate meanings. In Java it simply means a pointer, but in the context of "Pass-by-reference" it means a handle to the original variable which was passed in.
  2. Java is Pass-by-value. Java is a descendent of C (among other languages). Before C, several (but not all) earlier languages like FORTRAN and COBOL supported PBR, but allows usC did not. PBR allowed these other languages to emulate pass be reference by passing a Java referencemake changes to the passed variables inside sub-routines. In order to accomplish the same thing (i.e. a pointerchange the values of variables inside functions), C programmers passed pointers to variables into functions. Languages inspired by valueC, such as Java, borrowed this idea and continue to pass pointer to methods as C did, except that Java calls its pointers References. Meaning it passesAgain, this is a copydifferent use of the Java referenceword "Reference" than in "Pass-By-Reference". EDIT: since someone made a comment about this, let me explain. Before C, several (but not all) earlier languages like FORTRAN and COBOL supported PBR, but C did not. In order to change the values of variables inside functions, C programmers emulated PBR by passing pointers to variables into functions. Languages inspired by C, such as Java, borrowed this idea and continue to emulate PBR as C did.
  3. C++ allows Pass-by-reference by declaring a reference parameter using the "&" character (which happens to be the same character used to indicate "the address of a variable" in both C and C++). For example, if we pass in a pointer by reference, the parameter and the argument are not just pointing to the same object. Rather, they are the same variable. If one gets set to a different address or to null, so does the other.
  4. In the C++ example below I'm passing a pointer to a null terminated string by reference. And in the Java example below I'm passing a Java reference to a String (again, the same as a pointer to a String) by value. Notice the output in the comments.

I might be a little obsessed with this post. Probably because I feel that the makers of Java inadvertently spread misinformation. If instead of using the word "reference" for pointers they had used something else, say dingleberry, there would've been no problem. You could say, "Java passes dingleberries by value and not by reference", and nobody would be confused. (Hence forth, when referencing pass by reference vs value, I shall refer to references as dinglebarries.)

Anyway, I noticed a comment by dhackner in an older post, whowhich made a balloon analogy which I really liked. So much so that I decided to glue together some clip-art to make a set of cartoons to illustrate the point.

  1. The term "reference" is a overloaded with two separate meanings. In Java it simply means a pointer, but in the context of "Pass-by-reference" it means a handle to the original variable which was passed in.
  2. Java is Pass-by-value, but allows us to emulate pass be reference by passing a Java reference (i.e. a pointer) by value. Meaning it passes a copy of the Java reference. EDIT: since someone made a comment about this, let me explain. Before C, several (but not all) earlier languages like FORTRAN and COBOL supported PBR, but C did not. In order to change the values of variables inside functions, C programmers emulated PBR by passing pointers to variables into functions. Languages inspired by C, such as Java, borrowed this idea and continue to emulate PBR as C did.
  3. C++ allows Pass-by-reference by declaring a reference parameter using the "&" character (which happens to be the same character used to indicate "the address of a variable" in both C and C++). For example, if we pass in a pointer by reference, the parameter and the argument are not just pointing to the same object. Rather, they are the same variable. If one gets set to a different address or to null, so does the other.
  4. In the C++ example below I'm passing a pointer to a null terminated string by reference. And in the Java example below I'm passing a Java reference to a String (again, the same as a pointer to a String) by value. Notice the output in the comments.

I might be a little obsessed with this post. Probably because I feel that the makers of Java inadvertently spread misinformation. If instead of using the word "reference" for pointers they had used something else, say dingleberry, there would've been no problem. You could say, "Java passes dingleberries by value and not by reference", and nobody would be confused. (Hence forth, when referencing pass by reference vs value, I shall refer to references as dinglebarries.)

Anyway, I noticed a comment by dhackner in an older post, who made a balloon analogy which I really liked. So much so that I decided to glue together some clip-art to make a set of cartoons to illustrate the point.

  1. The term "reference" is a overloaded with two separate meanings. In Java it simply means a pointer, but in the context of "Pass-by-reference" it means a handle to the original variable which was passed in.
  2. Java is Pass-by-value. Java is a descendent of C (among other languages). Before C, several (but not all) earlier languages like FORTRAN and COBOL supported PBR, but C did not. PBR allowed these other languages to make changes to the passed variables inside sub-routines. In order to accomplish the same thing (i.e. change the values of variables inside functions), C programmers passed pointers to variables into functions. Languages inspired by C, such as Java, borrowed this idea and continue to pass pointer to methods as C did, except that Java calls its pointers References. Again, this is a different use of the word "Reference" than in "Pass-By-Reference".
  3. C++ allows Pass-by-reference by declaring a reference parameter using the "&" character (which happens to be the same character used to indicate "the address of a variable" in both C and C++). For example, if we pass in a pointer by reference, the parameter and the argument are not just pointing to the same object. Rather, they are the same variable. If one gets set to a different address or to null, so does the other.
  4. In the C++ example below I'm passing a pointer to a null terminated string by reference. And in the Java example below I'm passing a Java reference to a String (again, the same as a pointer to a String) by value. Notice the output in the comments.

I might be a little obsessed with this post. Probably because I feel that the makers of Java inadvertently spread misinformation. If instead of using the word "reference" for pointers they had used something else, say dingleberry, there would've been no problem. You could say, "Java passes dingleberries by value and not by reference", and nobody would be confused.

Anyway, I noticed a comment in an older post, which made a balloon analogy which I really liked. So much so that I decided to glue together some clip-art to make a set of cartoons to illustrate the point.

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Sanjeev
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Which means, java creates a copy of the passed parameters before executing a method. Like most people who tookstudied compilers in college, I used "The Dragon Book" which is THETHE compilers book. It has a good description of "Call-by-value" and "Call-by-Reference" in Chapter 1. The Call-by-value description matches up with Java Specs exactly.

WhenBack when I tookstudied compilers-in the 90's, I used the first edition of the book from 1986 which pre-dated Java by about 9 or 10 years. However, I just ran across a copy of the 2nd Eddition from 2007 which actually mentions Java! Section 1.6.6 labeled "Parameter Passing Mechanisms" describes parameter passing pretty nicely. Here is an excerpt under the heading "Call-by-value" which mentions Java:

Which means, java creates a copy of the passed parameters before executing a method. Like most people who took compilers in college I used "The Dragon Book" which is THE compilers book. It has a good description of "Call-by-value" and "Call-by-Reference" in Chapter 1. The Call-by-value description matches up with Java Specs exactly.

When I took compilers, I used the first edition of the book from 1986 which pre-dated Java by about 9 or 10 years. However, I just ran across a copy of the 2nd Eddition from 2007 which actually mentions Java! Section 1.6.6 labeled "Parameter Passing Mechanisms" describes parameter passing pretty nicely. Here is an excerpt under the heading "Call-by-value" which mentions Java:

Which means, java creates a copy of the passed parameters before executing a method. Like most people who studied compilers in college, I used "The Dragon Book" which is THE compilers book. It has a good description of "Call-by-value" and "Call-by-Reference" in Chapter 1. The Call-by-value description matches up with Java Specs exactly.

Back when I studied compilers-in the 90's, I used the first edition of the book from 1986 which pre-dated Java by about 9 or 10 years. However, I just ran across a copy of the 2nd Eddition from 2007 which actually mentions Java! Section 1.6.6 labeled "Parameter Passing Mechanisms" describes parameter passing pretty nicely. Here is an excerpt under the heading "Call-by-value" which mentions Java:

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Sanjeev
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  1. The term "reference" is a overloaded with two separate meanings. In Java it simply means a pointer, but in the context of "Pass-by-reference" it means a handle to the original variable which was passed in.
  2. Java is Pass-by-value, but allows us to emulate pass be reference by passing a Java reference (i.e. a pointer) by value. Meaning it passes a copy of the Java reference. EDIT: since someone made a comment about this, let me explain. Before C, several (but not all) earlier languages like FORTRAN and COBOL supported PBR, but C did not. In order to change the values of variables inside functions, C programmers emulated PBR by passing pointers to variables into functions. Languages inspired by C, such as Java, borrowed this idea and continue to emulate PBR as C did.
  3. C++ allows Pass-by-reference by declaring a reference parameter using the "&" character (which happens to be the same character used to indicate "the address of a variable" in both C and C++). For example, if we pass in a pointer by reference, the parameter and the argument are not just pointing to the same object. Rather, but that they are the same variable. If one gets set to a different address or to null, so does the other.
  4. In the C++ example below I'm passing a pointer to a null terminated string by reference. And in the Java example below I'm passing a Java reference to a String (again, the same as a pointer to a String) by value. Notice the output in the comments.

I might be a little obsessed with this post. Probably because I feel that the maker'smakers of Java inadvertently spread misinformation. If instead of using the word "reference" for pointers they had used something else, say dingleberry, there would've been no problem. You could say, "Java passes dingleberries by value and not by reference", and nobody would be confused. (Hence forth, when referencing pass by reference vs value, I shall refer to references as dinglebarries.)

Anyway, I noticed a comment by dhackner in an older post, who made a balloon analogy which I really liked. So much so that I decided to glue together some clipartclip-art to make a set of cartoons to illustrate the point.

  1. The term "reference" is a overloaded with two separate meanings. In Java it simply means a pointer, but in the context of "Pass-by-reference" it means a handle to the original variable which was passed in.
  2. Java is Pass-by-value, but allows us to emulate pass be reference by passing a Java reference (i.e. a pointer) by value. Meaning it passes a copy of the Java reference. EDIT: since someone made a comment about this, let me explain. Before C, several (but not all) earlier languages like FORTRAN and COBOL supported PBR, but C did not. In order to change the values of variables inside functions, C programmers emulated PBR by passing pointers to variables into functions. Languages inspired by C, such as Java, borrowed this idea and continue to emulate PBR as C did.
  3. C++ allows Pass-by-reference by declaring a reference parameter using the "&" character (which happens to be the same character used to indicate "the address of a variable" in both C and C++). For example, if we pass in a pointer, the parameter and the argument are not just pointing to the same object, but that they are the same variable. If one gets set to a different address or to null, so does the other.
  4. In the C++ example below I'm passing a pointer to a null terminated string by reference. And in the Java example below I'm passing a Java reference to a String (again, the same as a pointer to a String) by value. Notice the output in the comments.

I might be a little obsessed with this post. Probably because I feel that the maker's of Java inadvertently spread misinformation. If instead of using the word "reference" for pointers they had used something else, say dingleberry, there would've been no problem. You could say, "Java passes dingleberries by value and not by reference", and nobody would be confused. (Hence forth, when referencing pass by reference vs value, I shall refer to references as dinglebarries.)

Anyway, I noticed a comment by dhackner in an older post, who made a balloon analogy which I really liked. So much so that I decided to glue together some clipart to make a set of cartoons to illustrate the point.

  1. The term "reference" is a overloaded with two separate meanings. In Java it simply means a pointer, but in the context of "Pass-by-reference" it means a handle to the original variable which was passed in.
  2. Java is Pass-by-value, but allows us to emulate pass be reference by passing a Java reference (i.e. a pointer) by value. Meaning it passes a copy of the Java reference. EDIT: since someone made a comment about this, let me explain. Before C, several (but not all) earlier languages like FORTRAN and COBOL supported PBR, but C did not. In order to change the values of variables inside functions, C programmers emulated PBR by passing pointers to variables into functions. Languages inspired by C, such as Java, borrowed this idea and continue to emulate PBR as C did.
  3. C++ allows Pass-by-reference by declaring a reference parameter using the "&" character (which happens to be the same character used to indicate "the address of a variable" in both C and C++). For example, if we pass in a pointer by reference, the parameter and the argument are not just pointing to the same object. Rather, they are the same variable. If one gets set to a different address or to null, so does the other.
  4. In the C++ example below I'm passing a pointer to a null terminated string by reference. And in the Java example below I'm passing a Java reference to a String (again, the same as a pointer to a String) by value. Notice the output in the comments.

I might be a little obsessed with this post. Probably because I feel that the makers of Java inadvertently spread misinformation. If instead of using the word "reference" for pointers they had used something else, say dingleberry, there would've been no problem. You could say, "Java passes dingleberries by value and not by reference", and nobody would be confused. (Hence forth, when referencing pass by reference vs value, I shall refer to references as dinglebarries.)

Anyway, I noticed a comment by dhackner in an older post, who made a balloon analogy which I really liked. So much so that I decided to glue together some clip-art to make a set of cartoons to illustrate the point.

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Sanjeev
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Highlighting the critical difference in the Java code by stating how the output would've been different if Pass-by-reference was supported.
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Post Made Community Wiki by Sanjeev