11

In the absence of variadic templates (still!) in Visual Studio 2010/2011, a constructor that takes a lot of parameters can be problematic. For example the following won't compile:

    MyMaterials.push_back(std::make_shared<Material>(MyFacade,
                                                     name,
                                                     ambient,
                                                     diffuse,
                                                     specular,
                                                     emissive,
                                                     opacity,
                                                     shininess,
                                                     shininessStrength,
                                                     reflectivity,
                                                     bumpScaling,
                                                     maps,
                                                     mapFlags));

, because it has 13 parameters and I think make_shared is limited from arg0 to arg9. The obvious work-around is two part construction, but I was hoping to avoid this. Is there any other possibility here, apart from use of new instead of make_shared?

Thanks.

24

You can use construct a class which will then be moved into the heap allocated value.

MyMaterials.push_back(std::make_shared<Material>(
    Material(MyFacade, name, ambient, diffuse, specular, 
             emissive, opacity, shininess, shininessStrength, 
             reflectivity, bumpScaling, maps, mapFlags)));
2
  • The good thing is that make_shared will also use optimized one-allocation routine when creating shared_ptr – Alex Z Apr 4 '12 at 14:00
  • Sorry - I don't see how this avoids copying from local stack (where Material() is being constructed) to the heap (where make_shared will actually place it). In this case, how can the copy possibly be avoided? – Mordachai Feb 11 '13 at 21:06
1

you can create a "input struct" with all the relevant members.
fill it with the correct values and call the constructor with that as his only param.

1
  • Also a good idea, but I want to avoid extraneous "random" structs for things like this :-). – Robinson Apr 4 '12 at 13:58

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.