11

Let's say there's the following directory structure:

projects
   |
   +--lib1
   |   |
   |   +-CMakeFiles.txt
   |
   +--lib2
   |   |
   |   +-CMakeFiles.txt
   |
   +--test
       |
       +-CMakeFiles.txt

lib1/CMakeFiles.txt:

cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 2.0)

add_library(lib1 STATIC lib1.cpp)

lib2/CMakeFiles.txt:

cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 2.0)

add_subdirectory(../lib1 ${CMAKE_CURRENT_BINARY_DIR}/lib1)
add_library(lib2 STATIC lib2.cpp)
target_link_libraries(lib2 lib1)

test/CMakeFiles.txt:

cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 2.0)
project(test)

add_subdirectory(../lib1 ${CMAKE_CURRENT_BINARY_DIR}/lib1)
add_subdirectory(../lib2 ${CMAKE_CURRENT_BINARY_DIR}/lib2)

add_executable(test main.cpp)
target_link_libraries(test lib1 lib2)

I.e. lib2 depends on lib1 and test depends on both of them. (I know that technically static libraries don't "link", but that's just an example.)

The problem is that with the current setup, lib1 compiles twice - the first time it is within the "test" build directory, and a second time it is within "test/build_directory/lib2/build_directory". I'd like to avoid that.

I want to be able to add a dependency on lib1, lib2 or both of them (using add_subdirectory) to any project that's located elsewhere. So moving CMakeFiles isn't an option. I also want to avoid compiling any library several times.

How can I do that?

Platform: CMake v. 2.8.4 and Windows XP SP3

A top-level CMakeLists.txt file isn't an option, because I want to keep a clean top-level directory and be able to include libraries in other projects that can be located elsewhere. Because it is Windows, I can't "install package system-wide" - I don't want to lose ability to switch compiler on the fly. Utility libraries built with different compilers will use different C runtime libraries/ABI, and as a result will be incompatible.

6

With CMake, library dependencies are transitive, so you shouldn't call add_subdirectory twice in test/CMakeFiles.txt (nor do you need to list lib1 as a dependency of test since it is already a dependency of lib2's).

So you could modify test's CMakeFiles.txt to:

cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 2.8.7)  # Prefer the most current version possible
project(test)

add_subdirectory(../lib2 ${CMAKE_CURRENT_BINARY_DIR}/lib2)

add_executable(test main.cpp)
target_link_libraries(test lib2)

Also, you should probably remove the cmake_minimum_required calls from your non-project CMakeFiles.txt files (the lib ones). For further info, run:

cmake --help-policy CMP0000


This setup will still cause all libs to be recompiled if you add a similar test2 subdirectory and project which depends on lib1 and lib2. If you really don't want to have a top-level CMakeFiles.txt in projects/, then you're stuck with what you're doing, or you could use either the export or install command.

export would create a file which could be included by other projects and which imports the targets into the project which calls include.

install could install the libraries to another common subdirectory of projects/. Depending on your source directory structure, this could have the benefit of only making the intended library API headers available to dependent projects.

However, both of these options require the dependent library projects to be rebuilt (and installed) if they are modified, whereas your current setup includes all the dependent targets in your project, so any change to a source file in a dependent library will cause your test target to go out of date.

For further details about export and install, run:

cmake --help-command export
cmake --help-command install
3
  • 1
    There might be cases where you can uniquely assign the dependency lib1 to lib2 or vice versa. But there are also common cases where you have loosely coupled modules that you want to build (think different plugins) that share dependencies. So for example you have prog1 which has dependency lib1 and lib2 and you have prog2 which has dependency lib2 and lib3. And now if you want to have different combinations (for example you don't need prog2 in this case, so you just don't include it) then it can be a problem if lib2 is a dependency of prog2 because it is not available anymore. – user518450 Jan 19 '18 at 9:05
  • 1
    user518450 has a valid point; in my case I have a situation where both the application (called test in the example) and lib2 contains code using lib1, but the dependency from lib2 to lib1 is conditional, as it depends on the features enabled in lib2. So lib2 may or may not carry a dependency on lib1. Needless to say, I'd love to find a solution to this. – psyill Feb 6 '18 at 10:45
  • 1
    @psyill check my answer below with header-guards. it works like a charm for this kind of situations. – user518450 Feb 15 '18 at 8:02
13

One other solution is to add a guard at the top of the subdirectory-CMakeLists.txt:

if(TARGET targetname)
    return()
endif(TARGET targetname)

Which will cause cmake to do nothing the second time the subdirectory is added (if targetname is being defined in that file, of course).

This will lead to the lib beeing build in an sort-of-arbitrary place (depending on which module added it first) in the build/ tree, but it will be built only once and linked everywhere.

In your example, you would add

if(TARGET lib1)
    return()
endif(TARGET lib1)

at the top of lib1/CMakeFiles.txt

1
  • In CMake version 3.13, unfortunately, this solution doesn't work. CMake stops with an error message that points to the add_subdirectory call (that tried to include the subdirectory-CMakeLists.txt file) itself. The workaround is to put the guards around the add_subdirectory call: if (NOT TARGET lib1) add_subdirectory(lib1) endif() – ghd Apr 28 '19 at 9:48
0

Perhaps add a top-level CMakeLists.txt in your projects dir. Something like:

project( YourProjects )

add_subdirectory( lib1 )
add_subdirectory( lib2 )
add_subdirectory( test )

This should be sufficient and will give you a solution-file or makefile in your top-level build-dir. You should then remove the add_subdirectory( ../lib1 ... from your lib1 and lib2 projects, but instead simply link to them. CMake will know how to find lib1 and lib2 when compiling test.

I.e. in lib2:

project( lib2) 
add_library(lib2 STATIC lib2.cpp)
target_link_libraries(lib2 lib1)

and in test:

project( test )
add_executable(test main.cpp)
target_link_libraries(test lib1 lib2)

Added bonus: you will get makefiles/solutionfiles for building lib2 (with dependent lib1) in the lib2 directory...

5
  • Top-level cmakelists isn't an option. Now, if you could tell how to let cmake know that there's another project elsewhere... – SigTerm Apr 4 '12 at 14:39
  • Of course, I did not know about the extra requirement forbidding top-level cmakelists... You do know that you can still "install" packages on Windows, e.g. by specifying the CMAKE_INSTALL_PREFIX when running CMake? If necessary, you can also change the install-prefix when it is still on the default 'C:\Program Files'. – André Apr 4 '12 at 15:04
  • Did you consider separating all your libs and applications and write correct "BuildConfig.cmake" files and then use find_package in each project? – André Apr 4 '12 at 15:04
  • I know I can install, but that's not going to work. Windows has several different compilers that use several different C/CPP runtimes, and there are several different runtimes within single compiler (static/dll). As a result the major pain on windows platform is enforcing compatibility in several platform. So if you, say, make an utility library (statci) that calls c/cpp runtime (new/delete), install it into programFiles, and then attempt to use it in different compiler, you'll get problems. I'd like to avoid that. (continued) – SigTerm Apr 4 '12 at 15:34
  • I want to keep current directory structure and be able to change compiler on the fly or reuse single library ini multiple projects/different compilers - even if each project will have to build local copy of a library. I.e. full rebuild from source with dependencies. "find_package" has a bit different mentality (unix-like - build, install, use everywhere) that's not quite what I'm looking for. – SigTerm Apr 4 '12 at 15:38

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