So I have some code written before C++11 that parses a string based on template arguments. Instead of having one definition for each number of arguments I would like to use variadic templates, but I can't wrap my head around how to initialize a tuple correctly. See this simplified code of what I want, this is for the special case of 2 arguments:

template <typename Arg1, typename Arg2>
struct parser
{
  static tuple<Arg1, Arg2> parse(const string& str) 
  {
    Arg1 arg1;
    Arg2 arg2;
    // do the parsing with for example stringstream
    return tuple<Arg1, Arg2>(arg1, arg2);             
  }
};

I'm having problem with putting the arguments in the tuple in the variadic case. I can construct the return value holder with:

tuple<Args...> retVal; 

but I don't know if there is a way to iterate through the arguments and put them in a tuple. I've seen some recursive magic to get for example the printf functions, but I don't know if it could apply to this case.

  • Are you trying to change type of your tuple based on what came out of string parsing? – cababunga Apr 4 '12 at 16:05
  • 1
    It is possible to go over all the elements of a tuple without using recursion, but at the cost of an additional function call. I've described the technique several times (here, here, and here). (The important bits being indices in each case.) – Luc Danton Apr 4 '12 at 16:27
up vote 15 down vote accepted

You don't need a helper class. Do it with functions instead.

template <typename T> std::tuple<T> parse(std::istream& is) 
{
  T t; is >> t;
  return std::tuple<T>(std::move(t));
}

template <typename T, typename Arg, typename... Args>
std::tuple<T, Arg, Args...> parse(std::istream& is) 
{
  T t; is >> t;
  return std::tuple_cat(std::tuple<T>(std::move(t)),
                        parse<Arg, Args...>(is));
}

template <typename... Args>
std::tuple<Args...> parse(const std::string& str) 
{
  std::istringstream is(str);
  return parse<Args...>(is);
}

EDIT: Today, I got the idea how to do it in a very simple way with the use of the expansion:

template <typename T> T read(std::istream& is)
{
  T t; is >> t; return t;
}

template <typename... Args>
std::tuple<Args...> parse(std::istream& is) 
{
  return std::make_tuple(read<Args>(is)...);
}

template <typename... Args>
std::tuple<Args...> parse(const std::string& str) 
{
  std::istringstream is(str);
  return parse<Args...>(is);
}
  • thanx, i had no idea there was such a function as tuple_cat, great! – Rolle Apr 4 '12 at 19:27
  • @ipc It seems the order the streams are read is undefined if you use std::make_tuple(read<Args>(is)...). See stackoverflow.com/questions/14056000/… – Erik Sjölund Dec 30 '12 at 8:49
  • 1
    @ErikSjölund: AFAIR it is well defined (see § 8.5.4/4). – ipc Jan 2 '13 at 13:14
  • @ipc I guess I need buy the C++ standard to see that paragraph. In my question I was advised to use std::make_tuple {} instead of std::make_tuple() to avoid the stream from being read in an undefined order. But I just realized that your use of std::make_tuple is somewhat different from the one in my question. You have a function read<Args>(is) but I have a constructor Args(is). So it's a bit different. – Erik Sjölund Jan 2 '13 at 18:57
  • 2
    @ErikSjölund: Buying the standard? n3337 works just as fine. – ipc Jan 2 '13 at 20:21

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