This code...

#!/bin/bash

cond=10;

for i in {1..$cond}
do
    echo hello;
done

...just drives me crazy. This prints only one 'hello', as in i there is {1..10}.

#!/bin/bash

cond=10;

for i in {1..10}
do
    echo hello;
done

prints 10x hello, which is desired. How to put the variable into the condition? I tried different approaches, none of them worked. What a easy task though.. Thank you in advance.

  • 1
    Brace expansion doesn't work with variables. You can use something like $( seq "$cond" ) instead. – nosid Apr 4 '12 at 21:53
  • Nice solution, the Jonathan's is more universal, but this one didn't cross my mind. thx – tsusanka Apr 4 '12 at 21:58
up vote 6 down vote accepted

This will work:

cond=10;

for ((i=0;i<=$cond;i++));
do
    echo hello;
done
  • What a foolish man i am. I've seen a lot of various ways how to write for, but somehow I missed the most important one. Thank you. – tsusanka Apr 4 '12 at 21:57
  • (just a note, i started the for on 1, not 0 - not to confuse anyone) – tsusanka Apr 4 '12 at 22:00
  • 1
    Just to add, inside the for condition, it's not necessary to say $cond. cond by itself works fine too. – FatalError Apr 4 '12 at 22:20

Apart from the classic loop already answered, you can use some magic too:

#!/bin/bash

cond=10

for i in $(eval "echo {1..$cond}")
do
    echo hello
done

But, of course, is harder to read.

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