8

I'm working with nested JSON-like data structures in python 2.7 that I exchange with some foreign perl code. I just want to 'work with' these nested structures of lists and dictionaries in amore pythonic way.

So if I have a structure like this...

a = {
    'x': 4,
    'y': [2, 3, { 'a': 55, 'b': 66 }],
}

...I want to be able to deal with it in a python script as if it was nested python classes/Structs, like this:

>>> aa = j2p(a)  # <<- this is what I'm after.
>>> print aa.x
4
>>> aa.z = 99
>>> print a
{
    'x': 4,
    'y': [2, 3, { 'a': 55, 'b': 66 }],
    'z': 99
}

>>> aa.y[2].b = 999

>>> print a
{
    'x': 4,
    'y': [2, 3, { 'a': 55, 'b': 999 }],
    'z': 99
}

Thus aa is a proxy into the original structure. This is what I came up with so far, inspired by the excellent What is a metaclass in Python? question.

def j2p(x):
    """j2p creates a pythonic interface to nested arrays and
    dictionaries, as returned by json readers.

    >>> a = { 'x':[5,8], 'y':5}
    >>> aa = j2p(a)
    >>> aa.y=7
    >>> print a
    {'x': [5, 8], 'y':7}
    >>> aa.x[1]=99
    >>> print a
    {'x': [5, 99], 'y':7}

    >>> aa.x[0] = {'g':5, 'h':9}
    >>> print a
    {'x': [ {'g':5, 'h':9} , 99], 'y':7}
    >>> print aa.x[0].g
    5
    """
    if isinstance(x, list):
        return _list_proxy(x)
    elif isinstance(x, dict):
        return _dict_proxy(x)
    else:
        return x

class _list_proxy(object):
    def __init__(self, proxied_list):
        object.__setattr__(self, 'data', proxied_list)
    def __getitem__(self, a):
        return j2p(object.__getattribute__(self, 'data').__getitem__(a))
    def __setitem__(self, a, v):
        return object.__getattribute__(self, 'data').__setitem__(a, v)


class _dict_proxy(_list_proxy):
    def __init__(self, proxied_dict):
        _list_proxy.__init__(self, proxied_dict)
    def __getattribute__(self, a):
        return j2p(object.__getattribute__(self, 'data').__getitem__(a))
    def __setattr__(self, a, v):
        return object.__getattribute__(self, 'data').__setitem__(a, v)


def p2j(x):
    """p2j gives back the underlying json-ic json-ic nested
    dictionary/list structure of an object or attribute created with
    j2p.
    """
    if isinstance(x, (_list_proxy, _dict_proxy)):
        return object.__getattribute__(x, 'data')
    else:
        return x

Now I wonder whether there is an elegant way of mapping a whole set of the __*__ special functions, like __iter__, __delitem__? so I don't need to unwrap things using p2j() just to iterate or do other pythonic stuff.

# today:
for i in p2j(aa.y):
     print i
# would like to...
for i in aa.y:
     print i
1

3 Answers 3

15

I think you're making this more complex than it needs to be. If I understand you correctly, all you should need to do is this:

import json

class Struct(dict):
    def __getattr__(self, name):
        return self[name]

    def __setattr__(self, name, value):
        self[name] = value

    def __delattr__(self, name):
        del self[name]

j = '{"y": [2, 3, {"a": 55, "b": 66}], "x": 4}'

aa = json.loads(j, object_hook=Struct)

for i in aa.y:
    print(i)

When you load JSON, the object_hook parameter lets you specify a callable object to process objects that it loads. I've just used it to turn the dict into an object that allows attribute access to its keys. Docs

4
  • This is an interesting approach. However it looks like I loose the underlying nested dict() of list() of dict() structure, it's never constructed even. And I depend on that. Apr 5, 2012 at 12:28
  • @SusanneOberhauser: I'm not quite sure what you mean. It will simply be Struct() of list() of Struct() instead. isinstance(aa, dict) should still work, as Struct subclasses dict, and you can still use aa['y'] notation if you need it. It seems like it would be easy to adapt code to that.
    – Thomas K
    Apr 9, 2012 at 21:55
  • I realized that if I add nested substructures as a Struct instead of a dict, I get close to what I intend, as long as there is no name clashes between dict attributes and the dictionary attributes. aa.items is a built-in method for Struct, but it's a key in the dict for _dict_proxy. so aa.copy = 44 works as intended in the latter, but not in the former. I think I'd really like to understand how to map a whole set of member functions to the proxied object using python meta programming. Apr 10, 2012 at 12:49
  • Yes, I've deliberately used __getattr__ rather than __getattribute__, because overriding default methods opens up an ugly can of worms. If this is just for JSON, I'd either put up with having to do aa['items'], or specifically override a few common names to behave as keys rather than methods. If you're more interested in the programming theory, you might want to open up a new question just about that.
    – Thomas K
    Apr 10, 2012 at 17:23
5

There is an attrdict library that does exactly that in a very safe manner, but if you want, a quick and dirty (possibly leaking memory) approach was given in this answer:

class AttrDict(dict):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        super(AttrDict, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        self.__dict__ = self

j = '{"y": [2, 3, {"a": 55, "b": 66}], "x": 4}'
aa = json.loads(j, object_hook=AttrDict)
1

I found the answer: There is intentionally no way to automatically map the special methods in python, using __getattribute__. So to achieve what I want, I need to explicitely define all special methods like __len__ one after the other.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.