12

we're running into performance issues, and one potential culprit is a centralized use of a volatile singleton. the specific code is of the form

class foo {
  static volatile instance;
  static object l = new object();

  public static foo Instance {
    if (instance == null)
      lock(l) {
        if (instance == null)
          instance = new foo();
      }

    return foo();
  }
}

this is running on an 8-way box, and we're seeing context switching to the tune of 500,000 per second. typical system resources are fine - 25% cpu util, 25% memory util, low IO, no paging, etc.

does using a volatile field induce a memory barrier or any kind of cpu cache reload? or does it just go after main memory every time, for that field only?

11
  • I'm not sure why this needs to be a volatile, as you're not changing the reference.
    – Jon B
    Jun 16, 2009 at 17:18
  • i'm not either - this is someone's code i'm debugging. my main question, though, is could the use of volatile here cause contention issues on a multi-core x86 box
    – kolosy
    Jun 16, 2009 at 17:35
  • While this is an old question, why does this "DCL-style" code return a new instance in the non-null case? Doesn't that inherently break the guarantee it's a singleton? Jan 22, 2018 at 1:23
  • @user2864740 it works because volatile is roughly the equivalent of lock, so you're basically doing lock twice.
    – kolosy
    Jan 22, 2018 at 19:57
  • @kolosy The above comment was wrt: why is return foo(); returned instead of return instance; (where instance != null per the DCL pattern)? That will return a new foo each time. Jan 22, 2018 at 20:20

6 Answers 6

4

lock does induce a memory barrier, so if you are always accessing instance in a lock you don't need the volatile.

According to this site:

The C# volatile keyword implements acquire and release semantics, which implies a read memory barrier on read and a write memory barrier on write.

2
  • 1
    no - take a look at the code. theoretically, lock will only occur once, as after that the volatile variable will be set, and the outer check will pass.
    – kolosy
    Jun 16, 2009 at 17:17
  • 1
    Vance Morrison also covers DCL in this MSDN article - msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc163715.aspx
    – Keith Hill
    Jun 19, 2009 at 22:17
3

One thing volatile will not do is cause a context switch. If you're seeing 500,000 context switches per second, it means that your threads are blocking on something and volatile is not the culprit.

1

Sadly, the singleton takes a bad rap for just about everything :)

This isn't my domain of expertise, but as far as I know there's nothing special about volatile other than the compiler/run-time NOT re-ordering read/writes (to the variable) for optimization purposes.

Edit: I stand corrected. Not only does volatile introduce memory barriers, but what goes on (and incidentally, performance) depends largely on the particular CPU involved. See http://dotnetframeworkplanet.blogspot.com/2008/11/volatile-field-and-memory-barrier-look.html

This is why you still need the lock.

Questions which may/may not have been answered already:

  1. What is your singleton instance actually doing? Maybe the instance code needs to be refactored...
  2. What's the thread count of the running process? An 8 way box won't help you if you have an abnormally high thread count.
  3. If it's higher than expected, why?
  4. What else is running on the system?
  5. Is the performance issue consistent?
1
  • 1. not much. it's a container for some data that needs to be globally available 2. thread count is adequate. context switching/second is ridiculously high. 500,000/s 3. good question. 4. nothing. 5. yes
    – kolosy
    Jun 16, 2009 at 17:42
0

In your example here, volatile should not be the subject of any "slowdown". The lock() however, can involve huge roundtrips to the kernel, especially if there's a lot of contention for the lock.

There is really no need to lock your singleton in this case, you could just do

class Foo {
  static Foo instance = new Foo();
  public static Foo FooInstance() {
    return instance ;
  }
}

Ofcourse, if 'instance ' is used in a lot of different threads, you'd still have to lock() anything that alters that Foo, unless all methods/properties of Foo is readonly. e.g.

 class Foo {
      static Foo instance = new Foo();
      object l = new object();
      int doesntChange = 42;
      int canChange = 123;
      public static Foo FooInstance() {
        return instance ;
      }
      public void Update(int newVal) {
         lock(l) { // you'll get a lot of trouble without this lock if several threads accesses the same FOO. Atleast if they later on read that variable 
            canChange = newVal;
         }

      public int GetFixedVal() {
         return doesntChange; //no need for a lock. the doesntChange is effectivly read only
      }
    }
0

There's really no need for the use of volatile for a singleton, as you're setting it exactly once - and locking the code the sets it. See Jon Skeet's article on singletons for more info.

2
  • A DCL without a memory barrier on the read is "Third version - attempted (and failed) thread-safety using double-check locking .. Without any memory barriers, it's broken in the ECMA CLI specification too.". The OPs code is odd in that it can return multiple foo's (instead of returning instance, which represents a different issue) .. this old post (2006) makes no indication that a DCL without memory guards is safe for singletons (again, a bug in the code..?) Jan 22, 2018 at 1:18
  • benbowen.blog/post/cmmics_iii - see note on ".Net memory model 2.0" 'guarantees'. Jan 22, 2018 at 1:36
0

The short answer is, Yes it creates a memory barrier (flushes everything and goes to main memory, not just that single variable), but No it will not be the cause of context switching.

Also, as others have mentioned, I don't believe volatile is necessary here.

2
  • volatile is necessary to guarantee thread-safety (it is not the only option, but is one that is required in the basic DCL singleton pattern). It prevents re-ordering (and ensures a "non-stale" read) when the code does not acquire the lock: if the code always entered the lock there would be no benefit of volatile. Jan 22, 2018 at 22:28
  • I agree with your statement, but in the above example a lock is being used which includes memory barriers and prevents reordering. Or am I confusing something?
    – gbasin
    Apr 5, 2018 at 19:25

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