18

How can I create a pie chart with CSS like the one below?

enter image description here

11

Oh my! Have you seen Google Chart Tools?

https://google-developers.appspot.com/chart/interactive/docs/gallery/piechart

This is stupid easy to implement, but my problem with it is the "external api" part. If google decides to can this or google goes down, bye bye chart! But as far as beauty and the selection of other charts, google charts is kinda a cool find.

  • I believe you can download the google.visualization API from the Google Visualization API Reference page, however the terms of service do not allow you to download and save or host the google.load or google.visualization code. – ᴍᴀᴛᴛ ʙᴀᴋᴇʀ Sep 26 '14 at 13:54
  • 1
    This does not make a chart in CSS, like you asked for... and should not be the accepted answer. If you like this answer, you should change the question to "how to make a pie chart in JavaScript/CSS". – hiburn8 Oct 15 '19 at 15:47
8

I saw some people opting for Google Developers Tool, its very tough and it also uses JS and you only want CSS. So here is the most easy way, Pure CSS, made by using background gradient.

.pie {
  width: 400px;
  height: 400px;
  background-image: conic-gradient(orange 64%, blue 17%, black);
  border-radius: 50%
}
<div class="pie"></div>

  • Firefox (69) says the background-image is invalid, and doesn't display anything. – Martin Tournoij Sep 7 '19 at 13:46
8

I find this the easiest CSS-only solution. Somewhat simplified below.

    .pieContainer {
      height: 150px;
      position: relative;
    }
    
    .pieBackground {
      position: absolute;
      width: 150px;
      height: 150px;
      border-radius: 100%;
      box-shadow: 0px 0px 8px rgba(0,0,0,0.5);
    } 
    
    .pie {
      transition: all 1s;
      position: absolute;
      width: 150px;
      height: 150px;
      border-radius: 100%;
      clip: rect(0px, 75px, 150px, 0px);
    }
    
    .hold {
      position: absolute;
      width: 150px;
      height: 150px;
      border-radius: 100%;
      clip: rect(0px, 150px, 150px, 75px);
    }
    
    #pieSlice1 .pie {
      background-color: #1b458b;
      transform:rotate(30deg);
    }
    
    #pieSlice2 {
      transform: rotate(30deg);
    }
    
    #pieSlice2 .pie {
      background-color: #0a0;
      transform: rotate(60deg);
    }
    
    #pieSlice3 {
      transform: rotate(90deg);
    }
    
    #pieSlice3 .pie {
      background-color: #f80;
      transform: rotate(120deg);
    }
    
    #pieSlice4 {
      transform: rotate(210deg);
    }
    
    #pieSlice4 .pie {
      background-color: #08f;
      transform: rotate(10deg);
    }
    
    #pieSlice5 {
      transform: rotate(220deg);
    }
    
    #pieSlice5 .pie {
      background-color: #a04;
      transform: rotate(70deg);
    }
    
    #pieSlice6 {
      transform: rotate(290deg);
    }
    
    #pieSlice6 .pie {
      background-color: #ffd700;
      transform: rotate(70deg);
    }
    
    .innerCircle {
      position: absolute;
      width: 120px;
      height: 120px;
      background-color: #444;
      border-radius: 100%;
      top: 15px;
      left: 15px; 
      box-shadow: 0px 0px 8px rgba(0,0,0,0.5) inset;
      color: white;
    }
    .innerCircle .content {
      position: absolute;
      display: block;
      width: 120px;
      top: 30px;
      left: 0;
      text-align: center;
      font-size: 14px;
    }
    <div class="pieContainer">
      <div class="pieBackground"></div>
      <div id="pieSlice1" class="hold"><div class="pie"></div></div>
      <div id="pieSlice2" class="hold"><div class="pie"></div></div>
      <div id="pieSlice3" class="hold"><div class="pie"></div></div>
      <div id="pieSlice4" class="hold"><div class="pie"></div></div>
      <div id="pieSlice5" class="hold"><div class="pie"></div></div>
      <div id="pieSlice6" class="hold"><div class="pie"></div></div>
      <div class="innerCircle"><div class="content"><b>Data</b><br>from 16<sup>th</sup> April, 2014</div></div>
    </div>

2

As far as I'm aware this is no (yet) possible with css3. However the new html5 canvas element provides everything you want. It can easily be accessed and used over javascript. A small tutorial on the basic usage can be found here.

An other question on stackoverflow even was on the same topic. See "HTML5 Canvas pie chart". (There is "Graphing Data in the HTML5 Canvas Element Part IV Simple Pie Charts" in the first answer to a tutorial about pie charts using canvas elements)

1

I was looking for ways to build these pies, either via pure CSS or even using some Javascript. Today I found an article on SmashingMagazine that points to a talk from Lea Verou where she totally nails the subject. It's really, really worth the watch!

1

Stumbled on this thread while search for the same. So far I found https://keithclark.co.uk/articles/single-element-pure-css-pie-charts/ which explains how you can write even CSS for dynamically generated pies on pure CSS. The problem there is that is uses conic-gradient, which according to https://caniuse.com/#search=conic-gradient is not that widely supported yet. Solution from Mastababa is another alternative, but seems to me you will require a lot of adjustments to make it into a "library" and if you remove inner circle it looks a bit awkward.

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