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This is an offshoot of this question: Chrome counts characters wrong in textarea with maxlength attribute


In that question it was found that Javascript counts carriage returns are one character when in fact it is two (\r\n), why is that?

Test Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/maniator/E527z/

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For reasons unknown, jQuery always converts all newlines in the value of a <textarea> to a single character. That is, if the browser gives it \r\n for a newline, jQuery makes sure it's just \n in the return value of .val(). (Actually the reason probably isn't "unknown"; it's probably to normalize the results across browsers, because IE reports newlines as being 2 characters long.)

Chrome and Firefox both count the length of <textarea> tags the same way for the purposes of "maxlength".

However, the HTTP spec insists that newlines be represented as \r\n. Thus, jQuery, webkit, and Firefox all get this wrong. When the field is posted, webkit and Firefox correctly add the newlines!

The upshot is that "maxlength" on <textarea> tags is pretty much useless if your server-side code really has a fixed maximum size for a field value.

Edit This is still an issue in 2015 - at least on Chrome 45.0.2454 and IE 11.0.9600.

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    "The upshot is that "maxlength" on <textarea> tags is pretty much useless if your server-side code really has a fixed maximum size for a field value." I'm confused. It seems to me you are saying jQuery reports newlines as a single character, but the browser correctly uses two characters. If this is the case, wouldn't the maxlength attribute actually work correctly and count newlines as two characters, which is how the data will be saved on the backend? – wired_in Oct 29 '14 at 20:54
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    @wired_in no, because the browser maintainers are weird people and they don't seem to understand the whole point of maxlength (my personal opinion). I've logged bugs against Firefox and WebKit and the amount of bizarre uninformed pushback I've gotten is amazing. The maxlength implementations check the length as returned by .value, which is to say the length without the CR characters that are introduced when the form is posted. I've moved on and I'll just stick with my JavaScript solution. – Pointy Oct 30 '14 at 4:29
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    "The maxlength implementations check the length as returned by .value, which is to say the length without the CR characters" - It's the other way round. maxlength counts the CR+LF (which JavaScript does not) - as demonstrated by the above jsfiddle and in the linked question. So, maxlength is actually correct with respect to server-side code, it's only a "problem" if you are also processing this with client-side JavaScript. – MrWhite Sep 5 '15 at 21:56
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    @w3d wait, I take that back - see this extremely simple jsfiddle. Type stuff, including hard returns, and see how many characters Firefox lets you type. Firefox 40.0.3 is clearly treating hard returns as 1 character, not 2. – Pointy Sep 5 '15 at 22:55
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    I've updated the JS fiddle to update faster/on-the-fly as you type jsfiddle.net/E527z/35 but I don't see any browser treating textarea linebreaks as 2 characters (\r + \n) in JavaScript or when applying the maxlength attribute (including Chrome up to 65/67)... when submitting to the server, the linebreaks are "doubled" as \r\n as expected by the specs. – scunliffe Apr 3 '18 at 15:10

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