725

I created keys as instructed in the github tutorial, registered them with github, and tried using ssh-agent explicitly — yet git continues to ask me for my passphrase every time I try to do a pull or a push.

What could be the cause?

1

21 Answers 21

1355

Once you have started the SSH agent with:

eval $(ssh-agent)

Do either:

  1. To add your private key to it:

     ssh-add
    

    This will ask you your passphrase just once, and then you should be allowed to push, provided that you uploaded the public key to Github.

  2. To add and save your key permanently on macOS:

     ssh-add -K  
    

    This will persist it after you close and re-open it by storing it in user's keychain.

    If you see a warning about deprecated flags, try the new variant:

     ssh-add --apple-use-keychain 
    
  3. To add and save your key permanently on Ubuntu (or equivalent):

      ssh-add ~/.ssh/id_rsa
    
19
  • 26
    log-out of the server, ssh back in, run git pull, prompt me for password again.
    – code-8
    Oct 3, 2016 at 22:31
  • 38
    ssh-add -K will persist it after you close and re-open it by storing it in user's keychain.
    – Kirk
    Jan 7, 2017 at 1:05
  • 78
    @Kirk ssh-add -K gives the following: unknown option -- K usage: ssh-add [options] [file ...] Options: -l List fingerprints of all identities. -L List public key parameters of all identities. -k Load only keys and not certificates. -c Require confirmation to sign using identities -t life Set lifetime (in seconds) when adding identities. -d Delete identity. -D Delete all identities. -x Lock agent. -X Unlock agent. -s pkcs11 Add keys from PKCS#11 provider.
    – Sandeep C
    Feb 12, 2017 at 10:35
  • 29
    I still get prompted for a passphrase regardless. Mar 9, 2017 at 20:37
  • 27
    -K is apple specific. See help.github.com/articles/…
    – bkdir
    Jul 17, 2018 at 15:32
305

This has been happening to me after restarts since upgrading from OS X El Capitan (10.11) to macOS Sierra (10.12). The ssh-add solution worked temporarily but would not persist across another restart.

The permanent solution was to edit (or create) ~/.ssh/config and enable the UseKeychain option.

Host *
    UseKeychain yes

Related: macOS keeps asking my ssh passphrase since I updated to Sierra

2
72

If you've tried ssh-add and you're still prompted to enter your passphrase then try using ssh-add -K. This adds your passphrase to your keychain.

Update: if you're using macOS Sierra then you likely need to do another step as the above might no longer work. Add the following to your ~/.ssh/config:

Host *
  UseKeychain yes
4
  • 3
    Still prompts me for a passphrase. Mar 9, 2017 at 20:37
  • @IgorGanapolsky Are you using macOS Sierra? If so, check out what I just added to the answer. I hope that helps. Mar 11, 2017 at 8:30
  • 3
    Yes, I am on Sierra. However, here is the line that worked worked for me too: AddKeysToAgent yes Mar 13, 2017 at 13:21
  • 1
    This also works with BitBucket Cloud. I was having issues in GitKraken and this resolved my issues.
    – Malachi
    Mar 18, 2020 at 15:38
66

I would try the following:

  1. Start GitBash
  2. Edit your ~/.bashrc file
  3. Add the following lines to the file

SSH_ENV=$HOME/.ssh/environment

# start the ssh-agent
function start_agent {
    echo "Initializing new SSH agent..."
    # spawn ssh-agent
    /usr/bin/ssh-agent | sed 's/^echo/#echo/' > ${SSH_ENV}
    echo succeeded
    chmod 600 ${SSH_ENV}
    . ${SSH_ENV} > /dev/null
    /usr/bin/ssh-add
}

if [ -f "${SSH_ENV}" ]; then
     . ${SSH_ENV} > /dev/null
     ps -ef | grep ${SSH_AGENT_PID} | grep ssh-agent$ > /dev/null || {
        start_agent;
    }
else
    start_agent;
fi
  1. Save and close the file
  2. Close GitBash
  3. Reopen GitBash
  4. Enter your passphrase
6
  • 6
    For future reference, this also works with zsh. Just add this to .zshrc
    – Arda
    Jul 21, 2015 at 11:11
  • 3
    I believe this assumes your keyfile is called id_rsa. If you have a custom name, you should use eg. /usr/bin/ssh-add ~/.ssh/custom_filename Aug 4, 2016 at 9:37
  • 2
    Can you explain what happen to this script?
    – LeeR
    Oct 31, 2018 at 4:54
  • 2
    @Lee it starts the ssh-agent if not already running, which is what makes sure not to ask you the ssh passphrase on every push (more or less).
    – Roland
    Oct 31, 2018 at 8:12
  • 1
    This just runs ssh-agent and adds the key on every login. You still have to enter password each time you login. So for example if you have scripts ssh-ing and doing GIT commands, this is unfortunately not useful at all.
    – trainoasis
    Aug 8, 2019 at 12:00
45

What worked for me on Windows was (I had cloned code from a repo 1st):

eval $(ssh-agent)
ssh-add 
git pull 

at which time it asked me one last time for my passphrase

Credits: the solution was taken from https://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/12195/how-to-avoid-being-asked-passphrase-each-time-i-push-to-bitbucket

2
  • 3
    if you are using a non default rsa file name, then be sure to use it on the second command: ssh-add /c/Users/you_user/.ssh/id_rsa_abcxyz Aug 3, 2020 at 9:16
  • 10
    this only works while the gitbash is active for me. Once I close it, again I need to provide credentials
    – Brooklyn99
    Nov 13, 2020 at 0:24
38

Try adding this to your ~/.ssh/config:

Host *
   AddKeysToAgent yes
   UseKeychain yes
   IdentityFile ~/.ssh/id_rsa

... assuming your private key is named id_rsa

6
  • 17
    UseKeychain yes is only valid for mac
    – oz123
    Apr 13, 2018 at 7:26
  • 4
    @Oz123 what's the equivalent for windows Apr 13, 2018 at 13:32
  • 1
    @Oz123 I think the equivalent on Windows is AddKeysToAgent yes check this answer stackoverflow.com/questions/52423626/…
    – fedeteka
    Apr 22, 2019 at 19:04
  • This is a much more universal answer than the others (works on any OS, except for the UseKeyChain part). I should be the accepted answer IMHO. Thanks @IgorGanapolsky
    – gfd
    Jul 21, 2020 at 14:48
  • Excellent. How would you go about specifying several ssh keys if you have accounts in Gitlab, Github, etc. and you are managing projects locally to push to those? May 12, 2021 at 7:46
11

If the above solutions are not working for me, one thing to check is that you actually have the public key too (typically id_rsa.pub). It is unusual not to, but that was the cause for me.

To create your public key from your private key:

ssh-keygen -y -f ~/.ssh/id_rsa > ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub
1
  • This did it for me! Thanks! :)
    – wislon
    Nov 22, 2021 at 8:40
11

Run the following:

eval $(ssh-agent) && ssh-add ~/.ssh/id_rsa &>/dev/null

Enter the passphrase, then check git. Git should not ask for passphrase after this command.

The original source: https://gist.github.com/egoens/c3aa494fc246bb4828e517407d56718d

10

If you are not using GitBash and are on Windows - you need to start your ssh-agent using this command

start-ssh-agent.cmd

If your ssh agent is not set up, you can open PowerShell as admin and set it to manual mode

Get-Service -Name ssh-agent | Set-Service -StartupType Manual
0
8

I had a similar issue, but the other answers didn't fix my problem. I thought I'd go ahead and post this just in case someone else has a screwy setup like me.

It turns out I had multiple keys and Git was using the wrong one first. It would prompt me for my passphrase, and I would enter it, then Git would use a different key that would work (that I didn't need to enter the passphrase on).

I just deleted the key that it was using to prompt me for a passphrase and now it works!

0
6

It sounds like you may be having trouble with SSH-Agent itself. I would try troubleshooting that.

1) Did you do ssh-add to add your key to SSH?

2) Are you closing the terminal window between uses, because if you close the window you will have to enter the password again when you reopen it.

1
  • 2
    Would be nice to add information on how to solve the first problem Jeff Welling.
    – ranu
    Aug 19, 2016 at 15:13
5

For Windows or Linux users, a possible solution is described on GitHub Docs, which I report below for your convenience.

You can run ssh-agent automatically when you open bash or Git shell. Copy the following lines and paste them into your ~/.profile or ~/.bashrc file:

env=~/.ssh/agent.env

agent_load_env () { test -f "$env" && . "$env" >| /dev/null ; }

agent_start () {
    (umask 077; ssh-agent >| "$env")
    . "$env" >| /dev/null ; }

agent_load_env

# agent_run_state: 0=agent running w/ key; 1=agent w/o key; 2= agent not running
agent_run_state=$(ssh-add -l >| /dev/null 2>&1; echo $?)

if [ ! "$SSH_AUTH_SOCK" ] || [ $agent_run_state = 2 ]; then
    agent_start
    ssh-add
elif [ "$SSH_AUTH_SOCK" ] && [ $agent_run_state = 1 ]; then
    ssh-add
fi

unset env

If your private key is not stored in one of the default locations (like ~/.ssh/id_rsa), you'll need to tell your SSH authentication agent where to find it. To add your key to ssh-agent, type ssh-add ~/path/to/my_key.

Now, when you first run Git Bash, you are prompted for your passphrase. The ssh-agent process will continue to run until you log out, shut down your computer, or kill the process.

1
3

Another possible solution that is not mentioned above is to check your remote with the following command:

git remote -v

If the remote does not start with git but starts with https you might want to change it to git by following the example below.

git remote -v // origin is https://github.com/user/myrepo.git
git remote set-url origin git@github.com:user/myrepo.git
git remote -v // check if remote is changed
2
  • This worked for me. in my case, I mistakenly set remote to git@github.com instead of github.com.
    – Peter
    Aug 7, 2020 at 3:17
  • worked for me as well, I didn't specify the user anymore, just this; origin git@github.com/myrepo.git May 16 at 3:31
3

In case you are on Win10:

I had the same problem. (previously had to update ssh-agent individually with a script from here because of a different problem)

Git did access my ssh config (git pull threw exceptions when I had nonsense-lines in ssh config), but never seemed to care about the private key I had added via ssh-agent and referenced in my config.

What fixed the problem was to execute the following command in PowerShell:

git config core.sshCommand (get-command ssh).Source.Replace('\','/')

(Details are in this link)

3

I try different solutions but nothing help. But this steps (My GitBash SSH environment always asks for my passphrase, what can I do?) from Bitbucket.com seams works well :

The idea is:

  1. you create ~/.bashrc file

  2. add follow script:

     SSH_ENV=$HOME/.ssh/environment
    
     # start the ssh-agent
     function start_agent {
         echo "Initializing new SSH agent..."
         # spawn ssh-agent
         /usr/bin/ssh-agent | sed 's/^echo/#echo/' > "${SSH_ENV}"
         echo succeeded
         chmod 600 "${SSH_ENV}"
         . "${SSH_ENV}" > /dev/null
         /usr/bin/ssh-add
     }
    
     if [ -f "${SSH_ENV}" ]; then
         . "${SSH_ENV}" > /dev/null
         ps -ef | grep ${SSH_AGENT_PID} | grep ssh-agent$ > /dev/null || {
             start_agent;
         }
     else
         start_agent;
     fi
    
  3. re-run Bash

3

previously -K flag is used to add key but now:

ssh-add --apple-use-keychain

The -K and -A flags are deprecated and have been replaced by the --apple-use-keychain and --apple-load-keychain flags, respectively.

1
  • For me this, worked. I was trying to import a private github repo via SSH Jun 14 at 6:36
1

on mac, if your ssh key need passphrase everytime and you want to skip it, then you can try below, it works fine for me

  1. eval "$(ssh-agent -s)"
  2. ssh-add -K .ssh/id_rsa
  3. add this default ssh configuration works for me

Host *
AddKeysToAgent yes
UseKeychain yes
IdentityFile ~/.ssh/id_rsa

1

Update the url of the origin remote using SSH instead of HTTPS;

git remote set-url origin "SSH URL COPIED FROM GIT REPO."

This what works with me.

1

If you happen to be using fish, there's a gist for it:

# config.fish
if not pgrep -f ssh-agent > /dev/null
  eval (ssh-agent -c)
  set -Ux SSH_AUTH_SOCK $SSH_AUTH_SOCK
  set -Ux SSH_AGENT_PID $SSH_AGENT_PID
  set -Ux SSH_AUTH_SOCK $SSH_AUTH_SOCK
end
1

Maybe not the most secure way to fix this, but simply do not set a passphrase, it is optional. If you don't set a passphrase, it will not ask for it. You can change the passphrase with

$ ssh-keygen -p -f ~/.ssh/id_ed25519
> Enter old passphrase: [Type old passphrase]
> Key has comment 'your_email@example.com'
> Enter new passphrase (empty for no passphrase): [Type new passphrase]
> Enter same passphrase again: [Repeat the new passphrase]
> Your identification has been saved with the new passphrase.
0

Seems that your local repo hasnt updated with ssh keys...at least this is what happened to me when going from https to ssh.

Have you done a remote reset?

git remote set-url origin <ssh url>

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