I'm using Linux and I created keys as instructed in the github tutorial, registered them with github, and tried using ssh-agent explicitly — yet git continues to ask me for my passphrase every time I try to do a pull or a push.

What could be the cause?

  • @uDaY - I've already tried to start ssh-agent - it didn't help. – Rogach Apr 5 '12 at 16:39
  • Recently there was breach in github so they wanted you to explicitly audit your ssh keys did you do it? with the one you primarily use? – uday Apr 5 '12 at 16:45
  • @uDaY - yes, I did. That same day. Now I try to do it from my another machine, with the newly generated key. – Rogach Apr 5 '12 at 16:47
  • @dm03514 - yes. – Rogach Apr 5 '12 at 16:48
  • Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/14762034/… – Jeff Jun 16 '15 at 5:05

11 Answers 11

up vote 801 down vote accepted

Once you have started the SSH agent with:

eval $(ssh-agent)
  1. You have to add your private key to it:

    ssh-add
    

    This will ask you your passphrase just once, and then you should be allowed to push, provided that you uploaded the public key to Github.

  2. To save key permanently:

    ssh-add -K  
    

    This will persist it after you close and re-open it by storing it in user's keychain.

  • 11
    log-out of the server, ssh back in, run git pull, prompt me for password again. – kyo Oct 3 '16 at 22:31
  • 28
    ssh-add -K will persist it after you close and re-open it by storing it in user's keychain. – Kirk Jan 7 '17 at 1:05
  • 57
    @Kirk ssh-add -K gives the following: unknown option -- K usage: ssh-add [options] [file ...] Options: -l List fingerprints of all identities. -L List public key parameters of all identities. -k Load only keys and not certificates. -c Require confirmation to sign using identities -t life Set lifetime (in seconds) when adding identities. -d Delete identity. -D Delete all identities. -x Lock agent. -X Unlock agent. -s pkcs11 Add keys from PKCS#11 provider. – Sandeep C Feb 12 '17 at 10:35
  • 6
    I still get prompted for a passphrase regardless. – Igor Ganapolsky Mar 9 '17 at 20:37
  • 6
    -K is apple specific. See help.github.com/articles/… – bkdir Jul 17 at 15:32

This has been happening to me after restarts since upgrading from OS X El Capitan (10.11) to macOS Sierra (10.12). The ssh-add solution worked temporarily but would not persist across another restart.

The permanent solution was to edit (or create) ~/.ssh/config and enable the UseKeychain option.

Host *
    UseKeychain yes

Related: macOS keeps asking my ssh passphrase since I updated to Sierra

  • 4
    I have no idea why Sierra started asking me this one day, but this worked. Thanks! (especially since I can't remember the passphrase!) – Nicolas Miari Jan 17 '17 at 12:31
  • 1
    worked for me thanks... I had done... ssh-add -K /Users/***/.ssh/git/id_rsa but it was still not working after terminal restart... thank you. – nawlbergs Jan 19 '17 at 15:12
  • 4
    I'm using mac and your answer is the only one which worked for me. Thanks a lot. – sunghun Apr 22 '17 at 11:40
  • 1
    Want to why this happen? Read the technical note on OpenSSH changes developer.apple.com/library/content/technotes/tn2449/… – samwize Apr 25 '17 at 15:38
  • This solution worked for me. I had the same problem after upgrading to Sierra. – danmakenoise Sep 5 '17 at 14:49

If you've tried ssh-add and you're still prompted to enter your passphrase then try using ssh-add -K. This adds your passphrase to your keychain.

Update: if you're using macOS Sierra then you likely need to do another step as the above might no longer work. Add the following to your ~/.ssh/config:

Host *
  UseKeychain yes
  • 1
    Still prompts me for a passphrase. – Igor Ganapolsky Mar 9 '17 at 20:37
  • @IgorGanapolsky Are you using macOS Sierra? If so, check out what I just added to the answer. I hope that helps. – Darryl Young Mar 11 '17 at 8:30
  • 2
    Yes, I am on Sierra. However, here is the line that worked worked for me too: AddKeysToAgent yes – Igor Ganapolsky Mar 13 '17 at 13:21

I would try the following:

  1. Start GitBash
  2. Edit your ~/.bashrc file
  3. Add the following lines to the file

SSH_ENV=$HOME/.ssh/environment

# start the ssh-agent
function start_agent {
    echo "Initializing new SSH agent..."
    # spawn ssh-agent
    /usr/bin/ssh-agent | sed 's/^echo/#echo/' > ${SSH_ENV}
    echo succeeded
    chmod 600 ${SSH_ENV}
    . ${SSH_ENV} > /dev/null
    /usr/bin/ssh-add
}

if [ -f "${SSH_ENV}" ]; then
     . ${SSH_ENV} > /dev/null
     ps -ef | grep ${SSH_AGENT_PID} | grep ssh-agent$ > /dev/null || {
        start_agent;
    }
else
    start_agent;
fi
  1. Save and close the file
  2. Close GitBash
  3. Reopen GitBash
  4. Enter your passphrase
  • For future reference, this also works with zsh. Just add this to .zshrc – Arda Jul 21 '15 at 11:11
  • This worked for me, each time I was opening up bash in the repo it would ask for the pass phrase, all fixed now thanks. – David Mar 11 '16 at 18:45
  • 1
    I believe this assumes your keyfile is called id_rsa. If you have a custom name, you should use eg. /usr/bin/ssh-add ~/.ssh/custom_filename – Juha Untinen Aug 4 '16 at 9:37
  • 1
    Can you explain what happen to this script? – Lee Oct 31 at 4:54
  • 1
    @Lee it starts the ssh-agent if not already running, which is what makes sure not to ask you the ssh passphrase on every push (more or less). – Roland Oct 31 at 8:12

Try adding this to your ~/.ssh/config:

Host * AddKeysToAgent yes UseKeychain yes IdentityFile ~/.ssh/id_rsa

... assuming your private key is named id_rsa

  • 5
    UseKeychain yes is only valid for mac – Oz123 Apr 13 at 7:26
  • @Oz123 what's the equivalent for windows – Igor Ganapolsky Apr 13 at 13:32
  • 1
    No clue, I use GNU\Linux ... – Oz123 Apr 13 at 17:18
  • This did the trick for me on MacOS. – Shobhit Chittora Jul 25 at 8:28

What worked for me on Windows was (I had cloned code from a repo 1st):

eval $(ssh-agent)
ssh-add 
git pull 

at which time it asked me one last time for my passphrase

Credits: the solution was taken from https://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/12195/how-to-avoid-being-asked-passphrase-each-time-i-push-to-bitbucket

  • Not much love for Windows users sometimes. Thanks for this! – Christopher Ronning Oct 11 '16 at 0:55
  • Question was about Linux!! – OZZIE yesterday

I had a similar issue, but the other answers didn't fix my problem. I thought I'd go ahead and post this just in case someone else has a screwy setup like me.

It turns out I had multiple keys and Git was using the wrong one first. It would prompt me for my passphrase, and I would enter it, then Git would use a different key that would work (that I didn't need to enter the passphrase on).

I just deleted the key that it was using to prompt me for a passphrase and now it works!

It sounds like you may be having trouble with SSH-Agent itself. I would try troubleshooting that.

1) Did you do ssh-add to add your key to SSH?

2) Are you closing the terminal window between uses, because if you close the window you will have to enter the password again when you reopen it.

  • 3
    How should I do it? – Rogach Apr 5 '12 at 16:43
  • 2
    Would be nice to add information on how to solve the first problem Jeff Welling. – ranu Aug 19 '16 at 15:13

If the above solutions are not working for me, one thing to check is that you actually have the public key too (typically id_rsa.pub). It is unusual not to, but that was the cause for me.

To create your public key from your private key:

ssh-keygen -y -f ~/.ssh/id_rsa > ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub

I try different solutions but nothing help. But this steps (My GitBash SSH environment always asks for my passphrase, what can I do?) from Bitbucket.com seams works well :

The idea is:

  1. you create ~/.bashrc file

  2. add follow script:

    SSH_ENV=$HOME/.ssh/environment
    
    # start the ssh-agent
        function start_agent {
        echo "Initializing new SSH agent..."
        # spawn ssh-agent
        /usr/bin/ssh-agent | sed 's/^echo/#echo/' > "${SSH_ENV}"
        echo succeeded
        chmod 600 "${SSH_ENV}"
        . "${SSH_ENV}" > /dev/null
        /usr/bin/ssh-add
    }
    
    if [ -f "${SSH_ENV}" ]; then
         . "${SSH_ENV}" > /dev/null
         ps -ef | grep ${SSH_AGENT_PID} | grep ssh-agent$ > /dev/null || {
            start_agent;
        }
    else
        start_agent;
    fi
    
  3. re-run Bash

To avoid git being asking for password once you have generated and configured ssh keys, don't use https, instead use:

git@bitbucket.org:<repo_owner>/<reponame>.git

or

ssh://git@bitbucket.org/<repo_owner>/<reponame>.git
  • Question has already mentioned that the repo is closed using SSH, and not HTTPS! – Jabbar_Jigariyo Nov 26 at 15:35

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