i have latitude and longitude columns in location table in PostgreSQL database, and I am trying to execute distance query with a PostgreSQL function.

I read this chapter of the manual:

https://www.postgresql.org/docs/current/static/earthdistance.html

but I think I'm missing something there.

How should I do that? Are there more examples available

up vote 19 down vote accepted

This module is optional and is not installed in the default PostgreSQL instalatlion. You must install it from the contrib directory.

You can use the following function to calculate the approximate distance between coordinates (in miles):

 CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION distance(lat1 FLOAT, lon1 FLOAT, lat2 FLOAT, lon2 FLOAT) RETURNS FLOAT AS $$
DECLARE                                                   
    x float = 69.1 * (lat2 - lat1);                           
    y float = 69.1 * (lon2 - lon1) * cos(lat1 / 57.3);        
BEGIN                                                     
    RETURN sqrt(x * x + y * y);                               
END  
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;
  • 2
    Can you explain the math in here? What 69.1 and 57.3 represent? – jamesfzhang Jul 15 '13 at 18:00
  • 1
    I'd imagine they are constants used to convert latitude and longitude into miles. – Jeffrey Biles Sep 24 '13 at 16:05
  • 5
    To use KM instead of miles, use constants 111.12 & 92.215 to replace 69.1 & 57.3 – Le Droid Jun 9 '14 at 23:19
  • 1
    Why is the approach to do this with Postgresql and not with Java for example in a function – Fernando Pie Jun 15 '17 at 5:01
  • @FernandoPie When there are many rows and the distance is part of the WHERE clause, it's faster to let the database filter the results than transfering all the rows to Java first. – Jodiug Oct 10 at 14:17

Here's another example using the point operator:

create extension cube;
create extension earthdistance;
select (point(-0.1277,51.5073) <@> point(-74.006,40.7144)) as distance;

     distance     
------------------
 3461.10547602474
(1 row)

Note that points are created with LONGITUDE FIRST. Per the documentation:

Points are taken as (longitude, latitude) and not vice versa because longitude is closer to the intuitive idea of x-axis and latitude to y-axis.

Which is terrible design... but that's the way it is.

Your output will be in miles.

Gives the distance in statute miles between two points on the Earth's surface.

  • Got a vote for being cleaner than the other answer based on earthdistance – igorsantos07 Nov 22 '15 at 5:24
  • thank you, great solution! – Bagdat Jun 18 '16 at 19:50
  • what is the unit of distance? – William Aug 30 at 9:35
  • "Gives the distance in statute miles between two points on the Earth's surface." – Steve Tauber Aug 31 at 8:55

Assuming you've installed the earthdistance module correctly, this will give you the distance in miles between two cities. This method uses the simpler point-based earth distances. Note that the arguments to point() are first longitude, then latitude.

create table lat_lon (
  city varchar(50) primary key,
  lat float8 not null,
  lon float8 not null
);

insert into lat_lon values
('London, GB', 51.67234320, 0.14787970),
('New York, NY', 40.91524130, -73.7002720);

select 
  (
  (select point(lon,lat) from lat_lon where city = 'London, GB') <@>
  (select point(lon,lat) from lat_lon where city = 'New York, NY')
  ) as distance_miles

distance_miles
--
3447.58672105301
  • 1
    Thanks, this answer is the best way to do it. You just need to run CREATE EXTENSION cube; CREATE EXTENSION earthdistance; to install earthdistance. – sudo Jul 27 '15 at 23:51

A more accurate version of @strkol's answer, using the Haversine formula

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION distance(
    lat1 double precision,
    lon1 double precision,
    lat2 double precision,
    lon2 double precision)
  RETURNS double precision AS
$BODY$
DECLARE
    R integer = 6371e3; -- Meters
    rad double precision = 0.01745329252;

    φ1 double precision = lat1 * rad;
    φ2 double precision = lat2 * rad;
    Δφ double precision = (lat2-lat1) * rad;
    Δλ double precision = (lon2-lon1) * rad;

    a double precision = sin(Δφ/2) * sin(Δφ/2) + cos(φ1) * cos(φ2) * sin(Δλ/2) * sin(Δλ/2);
    c double precision = 2 * atan2(sqrt(a), sqrt(1-a));    
BEGIN                                                     
    RETURN R * c;        
END  
$BODY$
  LANGUAGE plpgsql VOLATILE
  COST 100;

Input is in degrees (e.g. 52.34273489, 6.23847) and output is in meters.

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