27

I tried to write code to solve the standard Integer Partition problem (Wikipedia). The code I wrote was a mess. I need an elegant solution to solve the problem, because I want to improve my coding style. This is not a homework question.

  • 9
    You might get a more useful answer by posting your original code on codereview.stackexchange. – Steven T. Snyder Apr 5 '12 at 20:47
  • 1
    Thanks, I didn't know about that site before. – Hemesh Singh Apr 5 '12 at 20:50
  • The term 'elegant' is subjective. What some may find elegant, others won't. So don't be surprised if another programmer does not find your code 'elegant'. If it works and is maintainable, it's good enough. – 01100110 Apr 5 '12 at 21:09
33

While this answer is fine, I'd recommend skovorodkin's answer below:

>>> def partition(number):
...     answer = set()
...     answer.add((number, ))
...     for x in range(1, number):
...         for y in partition(number - x):
...             answer.add(tuple(sorted((x, ) + y)))
...     return answer
... 
>>> partition(4)
set([(1, 3), (2, 2), (1, 1, 2), (1, 1, 1, 1), (4,)])

If you want all permutations(ie (1, 3) and (3, 1)) change answer.add(tuple(sorted((x, ) + y)) to answer.add((x, ) + y)

  • 12
    Be warned that while somewhat elegant, this algorithm is extremely slow compared to efficient algorithms like this one, which sadly sacrificies elegance and readability for speed. My timings show it to be 46 times faster for number=10, 450 times faster for number=15 and 5500 times faster for number=22. At this point your algorithm used 8 seconds to complete, compared to 0.0014 seconds for the efficient version. – Lauritz V. Thaulow Jun 25 '13 at 12:03
  • 8
    @LauritzV.Thaulow that link redirects to a 404, I think this is the new URL: jeromekelleher.net/generating-integer-partitions.html – John Carter Dec 29 '15 at 22:47
37

A smaller and faster than Nolen's function:

def partitions(n, I=1):
    yield (n,)
    for i in range(I, n//2 + 1):
        for p in partitions(n-i, i):
            yield (i,) + p

Let's compare them:

In [10]: %timeit -n 10 r0 = nolen(20)
1.37 s ± 28.7 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

In [11]: %timeit -n 10 r1 = list(partitions(20))
979 µs ± 82.9 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

In [13]: sorted(map(sorted, r0)) == sorted(map(sorted, r1))
Out[14]: True

Looks like it's 1370 times faster for n = 20.

Anyway, it's still far from accel_asc:

def accel_asc(n):
    a = [0 for i in range(n + 1)]
    k = 1
    y = n - 1
    while k != 0:
        x = a[k - 1] + 1
        k -= 1
        while 2 * x <= y:
            a[k] = x
            y -= x
            k += 1
        l = k + 1
        while x <= y:
            a[k] = x
            a[l] = y
            yield a[:k + 2]
            x += 1
            y -= 1
        a[k] = x + y
        y = x + y - 1
        yield a[:k + 1]

It's not only slower, but requires much more memory (but apparently is much easier to remember):

In [18]: %timeit -n 5 r2 = list(accel_asc(50))
114 ms ± 1.04 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 5 loops each)

In [19]: %timeit -n 5 r3 = list(partitions(50))
527 ms ± 8.86 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 5 loops each)

In [24]: sorted(map(sorted, r2)) == sorted(map(sorted, r3))
Out[24]: True

You can find other versions on ActiveState: Generator For Integer Partitions (Python Recipe).


I use Python 3.6.1 and IPython 6.0.0.

  • 1
    Heh, this should very clearly be the accepted answer over mine. – Nolen Royalty Jul 26 '17 at 20:53
  • I know this is a long shot but I have 2 questions regarding this answer: Does it account for the permutations of the partitions? And where should I input the number I want to be partitioned (ex: 5)? – DGMS89 Aug 22 '17 at 14:11
  • 1
    @DGMS89, IIUYC, permutations are not included. I suppose [*itertools.chain.from_iterable(set(itertools.permutations(p)) for p in partitions(5))] gives you what you need for n=5 with permutations. – skovorodkin Aug 22 '17 at 23:55
  • @skovorodkin Thanks for the help. So I just add that line after the code in your answer? – DGMS89 Aug 23 '17 at 15:54
  • @DGMS89, check this out gist.github.com/skovorodkin/3f6678d64397523cd1b05779b666d726. Please note, that accel_asc is more performant, so if you want to use that code in production, you'd better use accel_asc rather than my partitions function. – skovorodkin Aug 24 '17 at 10:54
9

I've compared the solution with perfplot (a little project of mine for such purposes) and found that Nolen's top-voted answer is also the slowest.

Both answers supplied by skovorodkin are much faster. (Note the log-scale.)

enter image description here


To to generate the plot:

import perfplot
import collections


def nolen(number):
    answer = set()
    answer.add((number, ))
    for x in range(1, number):
        for y in nolen(number - x):
            answer.add(tuple(sorted((x, ) + y)))
    return answer


def skovorodkin(n):
    return set(skovorodkin_yield(n))


def skovorodkin_yield(n, I=1):
    yield (n,)
    for i in range(I, n//2 + 1):
        for p in skovorodkin_yield(n-i, i):
            yield (i,) + p


def accel_asc(n):
    return set(accel_asc_yield(n))


def accel_asc_yield(n):
    a = [0 for i in range(n + 1)]
    k = 1
    y = n - 1
    while k != 0:
        x = a[k - 1] + 1
        k -= 1
        while 2 * x <= y:
            a[k] = x
            y -= x
            k += 1
        l = k + 1
        while x <= y:
            a[k] = x
            a[l] = y
            yield tuple(a[:k + 2])
            x += 1
            y -= 1
        a[k] = x + y
        y = x + y - 1
        yield tuple(a[:k + 1])


def mct(n):
    partitions_of = []
    partitions_of.append([()])
    partitions_of.append([(1,)])
    for num in range(2, n+1):
        ptitions = set()
        for i in range(num):
            for partition in partitions_of[i]:
                ptitions.add(tuple(sorted((num - i, ) + partition)))
        partitions_of.append(list(ptitions))
    return partitions_of[n]


perfplot.show(
    setup=lambda n: n,
    kernels=[
        nolen,
        mct,
        skovorodkin,
        accel_asc,
        ],
    n_range=range(1, 17),
    logy=True,
    # https://stackoverflow.com/a/7829388/353337
    equality_check=lambda a, b:
        collections.Counter(set(a)) == collections.Counter(set(b)),
    xlabel='n'
    )
4

Much quicker than the accepted response and not bad looking, either. The accepted response does lots of the same work multiple times because it calculates the partitions for lower integers multiple times. For example, when n=22 the difference is 12.7 seconds against 0.0467 seconds.

def partitions_dp(n):
    partitions_of = []
    partitions_of.append([()])
    partitions_of.append([(1,)])
    for num in range(2, n+1):
        ptitions = set()
        for i in range(num):
            for partition in partitions_of[i]:
                ptitions.add(tuple(sorted((num - i, ) + partition)))
        partitions_of.append(list(ptitions))
    return partitions_of[n]

The code is essentially the same except we save the partitions of smaller integers so we don't have to calculate them again and again.

3

In case anyone is interested: I needed to solve a similar problem, namely the partition of an integer n into d nonnegative parts, with permutations. For this, there's a simple recursive solution (see here):

def partition(n, d, depth=0):
    if d == depth:
        return [[]]
    return [
        item + [i]
        for i in range(n+1)
        for item in partition(n-i, d, depth=depth+1)
        ]


# extend with n-sum(entries)
n = 5
d = 3
lst = [[n-sum(p)] + p for p in partition(n, d-1)]

print(lst)

Output:

[
    [5, 0, 0], [4, 1, 0], [3, 2, 0], [2, 3, 0], [1, 4, 0],
    [0, 5, 0], [4, 0, 1], [3, 1, 1], [2, 2, 1], [1, 3, 1],
    [0, 4, 1], [3, 0, 2], [2, 1, 2], [1, 2, 2], [0, 3, 2],
    [2, 0, 3], [1, 1, 3], [0, 2, 3], [1, 0, 4], [0, 1, 4],
    [0, 0, 5]
]
2

I'm a bit late to the game, but I can offer a contribution which might qualify as more elegant in a few senses:

def partitions(n, m = None):
  """Partition n with a maximum part size of m. Yield non-increasing
  lists in decreasing lexicographic order. The default for m is
  effectively n, so the second argument is not needed to create the
  generator unless you do want to limit part sizes.
  """
  if m is None or m >= n: yield [n]
  for f in range(n-1 if (m is None or m >= n) else m, 0, -1):
    for p in partitions(n-f, f): yield [f] + p

Only 3 lines of code. Yields them in lexicographic order. Optionally allows imposition of a maximum part size.

I also have a variation on the above for partitions with a given number of parts:

def sized_partitions(n, k, m = None):
  """Partition n into k parts with a max part of m.
  Yield non-increasing lists.  m not needed to create generator.
  """
  if k == 1:
    yield [n]
    return
  for f in range(n-k+1 if (m is None or m > n-k+1) else m, (n-1)//k, -1): 
    for p in sized_partitions(n-f, k-1, f): yield [f] + p

After composing the above, I ran across a solution I had created almost 5 years ago, but which I had forgotten about. Besides a maximum part size, this one offers the additional feature that you can impose a maximum length (as opposed to a specific length). FWIW:

def partitions(sum, max_val=100000, max_len=100000):
    """ generator of partitions of sum with limits on values and length """
    # Yields lists in decreasing lexicographical order. 
    # To get any length, omit 3rd arg.
    # To get all partitions, omit 2nd and 3rd args. 

    if sum <= max_val:       # Can start with a singleton.
        yield [sum]

    # Must have first*max_len >= sum; i.e. first >= sum/max_len.
    for first in range(min(sum-1, max_val), max(0, (sum-1)//max_len), -1):
        for p in partitions(sum-first, first, max_len-1):
            yield [first]+p
  • Here's a one-line version of the first one that returns an empty partition when n is 0: def _p(n, m): if not [[(yield (i,)+p) for p in _p(n-i,i)] for i in xrange(min(n,m),0,-1)]: yield () – user149100 Jan 17 '18 at 9:19
1
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
import timeit

ncache = 0
cache = {}


def partition(number):
    global cache, ncache
    answer = {(number,), }
    if number in cache:
        ncache += 1
        return cache[number]
    if number == 1:
        cache[number] = answer
        return answer
    for x in range(1, number):
        for y in partition(number - x):
            answer.add(tuple(sorted((x, ) + y)))
    cache[number] = answer
    return answer


print('To 5:')
for r in sorted(partition(5))[::-1]:
    print('\t' + ' + '.join(str(i) for i in r))

print(
    'Time: {}\nCache used:{}'.format(
        timeit.timeit(
            "print('To 30: {} possibilities'.format(len(partition(30))))",
            setup="from __main__ import partition",
            number=1
        ), ncache
    )
)

or https://gist.github.com/sxslex/dd15b13b28c40e695f1e227a200d1646

0

I don't know if my code is the most elegant, but I've had to solve this many times for research purposes. If you modify the

sub_nums

variable you can restrict what numbers are used in the partition.

def make_partitions(number):
    out = []
    tmp = []
    sub_nums = range(1,number+1)
    for num in sub_nums:
        if num<=number:
            tmp.append([num])
        for elm in tmp:
            sum_elm = sum(elm)
            if sum_elm == number:
                out.append(elm)
            else:
                for num in sub_nums:
                    if sum_elm + num <= number:
                         L = [i for i in elm]
                         L.append(num)
                         tmp.append(L)
    return out
  • 1
    There must be something wrong: I get [1,1], [1, 1], [2], [1, 1] for make_partitions(2). – smichr Apr 28 '16 at 4:28
0
F(x,n) = \union_(i>=n) { {i}U g| g in F(x-i,i) }

Just implement this recursion. F(x,n) is the set of all sets that sum to x and their elements are greater than or equal to n.

  • Interesting; do you generate duplicate samples which the union combines, and if so, how is the asymptotic perforance for large X? – ninjagecko Apr 5 '12 at 21:12
  • 8
    I do not understand what you are doing. Can you explain it a little bit ? – Hemesh Singh Apr 6 '12 at 4:42

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