4
MainWindows::MainWindow(QWidget *parent) :
                 QMainWindow(parent) , ui(new Ui::MainWindow) {
      ui->setupUi(this);

      some initialization code here
}

I want to terminate the whole application if the initialization failed, how could I do this?

Thanks.

11

qApp->exit() and this->close() both won't work when called within MainWindow's constructor.

The normal Qt int main() function looks like this:

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    QApplication application(argc, argv);

    MainWindow mainWindow;
    mainWindow.show();

    return application.exec();
}

...and qApp->exit() only works from within the qApp->exec()/application.exec() main loop, which, as you can see in int main(), you aren't yet within. It therefore has no effect.

And with this->close(), MainWindow() hasn't finished been created yet, and hasn't been shown yet, so it's not open - if it's not open, it can't be closed. =)

Using delayed initialization

I think the easiest way to solve this is to delay your initialization until after the constructor finishes:

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    QApplication application(argc, argv);

    MainWindow mainWindow;
    if(mainWindow.Initialize() == false)
        return 0;

    mainWindow.show();
    return application.exec();
}

Normally I prefer/recommend initializing in the constructor of classes, but here an exception needs to be made to work around this unusual circumstance.

Using a 'failed state' flag

Other ways of doing the same thing would be to continue to initialize in the constructor, but use a flag to mark that the MainWindow has "failed to initialize":

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    QApplication application(argc, argv);

    MainWindow mainWindow; //Initialize in constructor, like normal.
    if(mainWindow.Failed()) //Check results.
    {
        return 0;
    }

    mainWindow.show();
    return application.exec();
}

Using exceptions

Exceptions are also another way to handle this situation - but make sure you catch it, so no error messages get displayed by the OS (I forget if Windows detects). In your initialization, you report the error yourself, so you can report it with details.

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    QApplication application(argc, argv);

    try
    {
        MainWindow mainWindow; //Initialize in constructor, like normal.

        mainWindow.show();
        return application.exec();
    }
    catch(...)
    {
        return 0;
    }
}
  • This looks like a great (the best) answer and nobody appreciated it so far! – Zingam Aug 8 '14 at 9:54
  • @Zingam That's what I get for being two years late to the party. =P Ran into the same problem myself a few months back, so wrote up the answer when I couldn't find any better solution. – Jamin Grey Aug 8 '14 at 23:11
  • I used that solution with the try-catch just for the sake of using exceptions! But your solution won't work I bet (it didn't work for me :)! You need to use a pointer! When MainWindow goes out of scope it gets destroyed! You know what I am talking about! Basically: MainWindow* mw; try { mw = new MainWindow} ... bool returnCode = app.exec(); delete mw; return returnCode; – Zingam Aug 9 '14 at 12:13
  • I would suggest not to use exception in constructors, and I have another good options: use QTimer::singleShot( 0, this, SLOT(init()) ); in the constructor, and put all initialization here. init fucntion will call after constructor return and inside it you can use event dependent functions like quit and exit. – Jeka Jun 8 '15 at 10:26
5

How about exit() ?

MainWindows::MainWindow(QWidget *parent) :
                 QMainWindow(parent) , ui(new Ui::MainWindow) {
      ui->setupUi(this);

      //some initialization code here
      if (something_failed)
      {
          exit(1); // terminate process
      }
}
  • Yes, it is simple, clean and standard. And solves all the problems. – Alexander Shishenko Jan 24 '16 at 9:52
  • 1
    I'm concerned the main window's destructor isn't called; but perhaps it simply exits to the OS leaving memory leaks. – CodeLurker Nov 7 '16 at 5:37
  • 1
    This case has some problems. If you call exit() qt exit handlers will not be called, thus you can get tray icon "ghost" and other possible side effects. – BiTOk Jan 31 '18 at 17:44
2

This works for me:

QMetaObject::invokeMethod(this, "close", Qt::QueuedConnection);
1

you can use the assert method to terminate the program which will automatically chescks the condition, if the condition becomes false it terminate the program giving the line at which it terminated. The syntax is as follows:

Q_ASSERT(condition);

  • Q_ASSERT does nothing in release mode and is used to aid development in debug mode. Thus, it cannot really be used in these circumstances. – Robert Mar 22 '14 at 22:16
0

I want to terminate the whole application if the initialization failed, how could I do this?

Throw exception from the constructor. By default unhandled exception will terminate the whole application. You could also call QCoreApplication::quit - however it'll be better to still throw an exception, catch it elsewhere, and use QCoreAPplication::quit if things went really wrong.

Simply calling exit may result in data loss if you're, say, writing files.

  • And this is the correct solution. – Fenix Voltres Apr 6 '12 at 10:30
  • @Fenix Not completely correct: quit() doesn't usually have any effect when called from the constructor of the main window, because the event loop (QCoreApplication::exec()) isn't running yet at that point. – alexisdm Apr 6 '12 at 16:13
  • @alexisdm: You should reread my post: "throw an exception, catch it elsewhere, and use QCoreAPplication::quit ". – SigTerm Apr 6 '12 at 22:57
  • The main window is usually created before the call to qApp->exec(), so even when you catch the exception, calling qApp->quit() still doesn't have any effect, you can simply choose not to call qApp->exec(). – alexisdm Apr 6 '12 at 23:06
  • @Alexisdm: Then don't catch it, and let it terminate, duh. Not exactly a rocket science. Still a better solution than calling exit() (the one that is not in QApplication), though. – SigTerm Apr 6 '12 at 23:12

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