2

I'm hoping I named this question right and that I can explain properly what I mean. I have a list<> of a ViewModel that has been populated from the DB and in my controller I am trying to access a specific single item of that list by one of the item's properties values and change another property value.

For example my model might have a couple of properties:

    public int Id { get; set; }
    public bool IsChanged { get; set; }

and I want to access it by the 'Id' and change the 'IsChanged' property like so (I'm using #'s around the part I'm not sure about)

    list.#(select item in the list by it's Id)#.IsChanged = true;

I hope this makes sense and even if you may have a good link to a tutorial, Thanks :-)

3

If I understand correctly, using Single would lead to a null error if there are no matches, I would rather prefer using a SingleOrDefault which would return a null if there is no match... Here is probably a safe approach:

if(list != null)
{
  var item = list.SingleOrDefault(x => x.Id == 1);
  if(item !=null)
  {
    item.IsChanged = true;
  }
  else
  {
   // code to handle this case
  }
}
else
{
  // code to handle this case
}

And this is by far the best book I have read on LINQ...LINQ to Objects Using C# 4.0

Cheers...

  • This is not safe by itself. It won't crash but is it semantically the right thing to do? If no items is found you are basically doing nothing. But this might be a bug. – usr Apr 6 '12 at 22:21
  • Thanks for the quick response, worked a treat! – Adam Apr 6 '12 at 22:25
  • @usr Thanks...fixed my answer...but I was only suggesting a safer approach, nothing offense...you should use Single only when you are absolutely sure that there will be items for a given query in a collection...and thats why we have a SingleOrDefault, so that we can handle null situations...you just cannot write code that can throw exceptions... – NiK Apr 6 '12 at 22:44
  • Sure, just wanted to point that out. Your answer is superior. – usr Apr 6 '12 at 22:45
2
list.Single(x => x.Id == 123).IsChanged = true;

The Single() method expects there to be one and only one item that satisfies the query so you'll want to make sure your Ids are unique.

If no items satisfy the query, an ArgumentNullException will be thrown. If more than one item satisfies the query, an InvalidOperationException will be thrown.

If the property that you are trying to access is a reference type, you may want an additional check to ensure it has been instantiated.

  • 1
    @Adam - This is the correct way to perform the query and is just one of many querying methods available as part of LINQ to Entities (see msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb738550.aspx for the full list) – Jonathan S. Apr 6 '12 at 21:56
  • @JonathanS. Not necessarily disagreeing with you, but you do still have to handle the exceptions, and if performance is important to you, you might as well trap the errors yourself. – Robert Harvey Apr 6 '12 at 22:15
  • Thanks for the quick response, worked a treat! @JonathanS I see what you're saying about catching the errors myself, Ill keep it in mind :-) – Adam Apr 6 '12 at 22:24
  • @Robert Definitely. I was unclear; by "this" in my comment above I really meant using LINQ in the general sense (based on the nature of the question). – Jonathan S. Apr 6 '12 at 22:27

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