I have a four-column CSV file, using @ as the separator, e.g.:

0001 @ fish @ animal @ eats worms

The first column is the only column guaranteed to be unique.

I need to perform four sort operations on columns 2, 3, and 4.

First, column 2 is sorted alphanumerically. The important feature of this sort is it must guarantee that any duplicate entries within column 2 are next to each other, e.g.:

@ a @ @
@ a @ @
@ a @ @
@ a @ @
@ a @ @
@ b @ @
@ b @ @
@ c @ @  
@ c @ @  
@ c @ @  
@ c @ @  
@ c @ @  

Next, within the first sort, sort the lines into two categories. The first lines are those which do not contain the words “arch.”, “var.”, “ver.”, “anci.” or “fam.” anywhere within column 4. The second lines (which are sorted after), are those containing those words, e.g.:

@ a @ @ Does not have one of those words.
@ a @ @ Does not have one of those words.
@ a @ @ Does not have one of those words.
@ a @ @ Does not have one of those words.
@ a @ @ This sentence contains arch.
@ b @ @ Does not have one of those words.
@ b @ @ Has the word ver.
@ c @ @ Does not have one of those words.
@ c @ @ Does not have one of those words.
@ c @ @ Does not have one of those words.
@ c @ @ This sentence contains var.
@ c @ @ This sentence contains fam.
@ c @ @ This sentence contains fam.

Finally, sorting only within the separate categories of the second sort, sort the lines from “contains the most duplicate entries within column 3” to “contains the least number of duplicate entries within column 3”, e.g.:

@ a @ fish @ Does not have one of those words.
@ a @ fish @ Does not have one of those words.
@ a @ fish @ Does not have one of those words.
@ a @ tiger @ Does not have one of those words.
@ a @ bear @ This sentence contains arch.
@ b @ fish @ Does not have one of those words.
@ b @ fish @ Has the word ver.
@ c @ bear @ Does not have one of those words.
@ c @ bear @ Does not have one of those words.
@ c @ fish @ Does not have one of those words.
@ c @ tiger @ This sentence contains var.
@ c @ tiger @ This sentence contains fam.
@ c @ bear @ This sentence contains fam.

How can I sort the file alphanumerically by column 2, by the appearance of some key words in column 4, and by most common duplicate to least common duplicate in column 3?

up vote 3 down vote accepted

TXR: ( http://www.nongnu.org/txr )

@(bind special-words ("arch." "var." "ver." "anci." "fam."))
@(bind ahash @(hash :equal-based))
@(repeat)
@id @@ @alpha @@ @animal @@ @words
@  (rebind words @(split-str words " "))
@  (bind record (id alpha animal words))
@  (do (push record [ahash alpha]))
@(end)
@(bind sorted-rec-groups nil)
@(do
   (defun popularity-sort (recs)
     (let ((histogram [group-reduce (hash)
                                    third (do inc @1)
                                    recs 0]))
      [sort recs > [chain third histogram]]))

   (dohash (key records ahash)
     (let (contains does-not combined)
       (each* ((r records)
               (w [mapcar fourth r]))
         (if (isec w special-words)
           (push r contains)
           (push r does-not)))
       (push (append (popularity-sort does-not)                                 
                     (popularity-sort contains))                                
             sorted-rec-groups)))
   (set sorted-rec-groups [sort sorted-rec-groups :
                                [chain first second]]))
@(output)
@  (repeat)
@    (repeat)
@(rep)@{sorted-rec-groups} @@ @(last)@{sorted-rec-groups " "}@(end)
@    (end)
@  (end)
@(end)

Data:

0001 @ b @ fish @ Does not have one of those words.
0002 @ a @ bear @ Does not have one of those words.
0003 @ b @ bear @ Has the word ver.
0004 @ a @ fish @ Does not have one of those words.
0005 @ c @ bear @ Does not have one of those words.
0006 @ c @ bear @ Does not have one of those words.
0007 @ a @ fish @ Does not have one of those words.
0008 @ c @ fish @ Does not have one of those words.
0009 @ a @ fish @ Does not have one of those words.
0010 @ c @ tiger @ This sentence contains var.
0011 @ c @ bear @ This sentence contains fam.
0012 @ a @ fish @ Does not have one of those words.
0013 @ c @ tiger @ This sentence contains fam.

Run:

$ txr sort.txr data.txt 
0004 @ a @ fish @ Does not have one of those words.
0007 @ a @ fish @ Does not have one of those words.
0009 @ a @ fish @ Does not have one of those words.
0012 @ a @ fish @ Does not have one of those words.
0002 @ a @ bear @ Does not have one of those words.
0001 @ b @ fish @ Does not have one of those words.
0003 @ b @ bear @ Has the word ver.
0005 @ c @ bear @ Does not have one of those words.
0006 @ c @ bear @ Does not have one of those words.
0008 @ c @ fish @ Does not have one of those words.
0010 @ c @ tiger @ This sentence contains var.
0013 @ c @ tiger @ This sentence contains fam.
0011 @ c @ bear @ This sentence contains fam.

Here's an answer to your first question to help you get started:

sort data -t "@" -k 2,2 -k 3,4

How it works:

  • -t specifies the field separator which for you is the "@" sign.
  • -k 2,2 means sort on field two
  • -k 3,4 means resolve ties by sorting on field 3, then field 4

Here's a solution in Ruby.

#!/usr/bin/env ruby

class Row

  SEPARATOR = " @ "

  attr_accessor :cols

  def initialize(text)
    @cols = text.chomp.split(SEPARATOR)
    @cols.size == 4 or raise "Expected text to have four columns: #{text}"
    duplicate_increment
  end

  def has_words?
    cols[3]=~/arch\.|var\.|ver\.|anci\.|fam\./ ? true : false
  end

  def to_s
    SEPARATOR + 
      @cols[1,3].join(SEPARATOR) +
      " -- id:#{cols[0]} duplicates:#{duplicate_count}"
  end

  ### Comparison

  def <=>(other)
    other or raise "Expected other to exist"
    cmp = self.cols[1] <=> other.cols[1]
    return cmp if cmp !=0
    cmp = (self.has_words? ? 1 : -1) <=> (other.has_words? ? 1 : -1)
    return cmp if cmp !=0
    other.duplicate_count <=> self.duplicate_count 
  end

  ### Track duplicate entries

  @@duplicate_count = Hash.new{|h,k| h[k]=0}

  def duplicate_key
    [cols[1],has_words?]
  end

  def duplicate_count
    @@duplicate_count[duplicate_key]
  end

  def duplicate_increment
    @@duplicate_count[duplicate_key] += 1
  end

end

### Main

lines = ARGF
rows = lines.map{|line| Row.new(line) }
sorted_rows = rows.sort
sorted_rows.each{|row| puts row }

Input:

0001 @ b @ fish @ text
0002 @ a @ bear @ text
0003 @ b @ bear @ ver.
0004 @ a @ fish @ text
0005 @ c @ bear @ text
0006 @ c @ bear @ text
0007 @ a @ fish @ text
0008 @ c @ fish @ text
0009 @ a @ fish @ text
0010 @ c @ lion @ var.
0011 @ c @ bear @ fam.
0012 @ a @ fish @ text
0013 @ c @ lion @ fam.

Output:

$ cat data.txt | ./sorter.rb 
@ a @ fish @ text -- id:0007 duplicates:5
@ a @ bear @ text -- id:0002 duplicates:5
@ a @ fish @ text -- id:0012 duplicates:5
@ a @ fish @ text -- id:0004 duplicates:5
@ a @ fish @ text -- id:0009 duplicates:5
@ b @ fish @ text -- id:0001 duplicates:1
@ b @ bear @ ver. -- id:0003 duplicates:1
@ c @ bear @ text -- id:0005 duplicates:3
@ c @ fish @ text -- id:0008 duplicates:3
@ c @ bear @ text -- id:0006 duplicates:3
@ c @ lion @ var. -- id:0010 duplicates:3
@ c @ bear @ fam. -- id:0011 duplicates:3
@ c @ lion @ fam. -- id:0013 duplicates:3
  • 1
    Somewhere along the way, you edited out sort data -t "@" -k 2,2 -k 3,4 LOL. :) – Kaz Apr 7 '12 at 6:36
  • 1
    @Kaz it's in the other answer from me -- I keep the bash & ruby answers separate because they're so different. – joelparkerhenderson Apr 7 '12 at 7:18
  • What is the meaning of sorter.rb:27:in <=>': undefined method <=>' for nil:NilClass (NoMethodError)? – Village Apr 7 '12 at 7:31
  • 1
    @Village How are you getting that error message? What's suppose to be there is Ruby defining a method called "<=>" which is the comparator method. Your error sounds like you're comparing a null row; is it possible that your data text file has some blank lines, perhaps at the top or bottom? If so, delete the blank lines and try running the script. – joelparkerhenderson Apr 7 '12 at 7:35
  • @Villiage I have just updated the answer with some basic error checking for you. – joelparkerhenderson Apr 7 '12 at 7:42

This might work for you (very inelegant!):

sed 's/[^@]*@\([^@\]*\)@\([^@]*\)/\1\t\2\t&/;h;s/@/&\n/3;s/.*\n//;/\(arch\|var\|ver\|anci\|fam\)\./!ba;s/.*/1/;bb;:a;s/.*/0/;:b;G;s/\(.\)\n\([^\t]*\)/\2\t\1/' file |
sort | 
tee file1 |
sed 's/\(.*\)\t.*/\1/' |
uniq -c |
sed 's|^\s*\(\S*\) \(.*\t.*\t\(.*\)\)|/^\2/s/\3/\1/|' >file.sed
sed -f file.sed file1 |
sort -k1,2 -k3,3nr |
sed 's/\t/\n/3;s/.*\n//'
1 @ a @ fish @ Does not have one of those words.
2 @ a @ fish @ Does not have one of those words.  
3 @ a @ fish @ Does not have one of those words.
4 @ a @ tiger @ Does not have one of those words.
5 @ a @ bear @ This sentence contains arch.
6 @ b @ fish @ Does not have one of those words.
7 @ b @ fish @ Has the word ver.
8 @ c @ bear @ Does not have one of those words.
9 @ c @ bear @ Does not have one of those words.
10 @ c @ fish @ Does not have one of those words.
11 @ c @ tiger @ This sentence contains var.
12 @ c @ tiger @ This sentence contains fam.
13 @ c @ bear @ This sentence contains fam.

Explanation:

Make sort keys consisting of:

  1. The 2nd field
  2. 0/1: 0 represents 4th field without arch./var./etc. 1 represents those with.
  3. The count of 3rd field duplicates after sorting the above 2.

The file is eventually sorted using the above keys and then the keys deleted.

 q

First, I load the "csv" and get it into the right shape. The test data is called "worms" on my computer but because q doesn't use strings as the file name "type" (to protect against e.g. injection attacks), I need to use hsym to make a "file name":

t:flip `id`a`b`c!("SSSS";"@")0:hsym`worms;

Then I worked on which "fourth field" entries contained one of your words. I built a bitmap using like and applying it to each row(left) then each pattern(right) to get 0 where the word is not present, or 1 where one of them is:

t:update p:any each c like/:\:("*arch.*";"*var.*";"*ver.*";"*anci.*";"*fam.*") from t;

Then I want to find the number of duplicates. This is simply the count of rows by column 2 (a), column 3 (b) and within the present-category:

t:update d:neg count i by a,b,p from t;

Finally, I because I negated the count, all of my values "go the same way", so I can simply sort by those three columns:

`a`p`d xasc t

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