Hi I have the need to calculate the distance between two points having the lat and long.

I would like to avoid any call to external API.

I tried to implement the Haversine Formula in PHP:

Here is the code:

class CoordDistance
 {
    public $lat_a = 0;
    public $lon_a = 0;
    public $lat_b = 0;
    public $lon_b = 0;

    public $measure_unit = 'kilometers';

    public $measure_state = false;

    public $measure = 0;

    public $error = '';



    public function DistAB()

      {
          $delta_lat = $this->lat_b - $this->lat_a ;
          $delta_lon = $this->lon_b - $this->lon_a ;

          $earth_radius = 6372.795477598;

          $alpha    = $delta_lat/2;
          $beta     = $delta_lon/2;
          $a        = sin(deg2rad($alpha)) * sin(deg2rad($alpha)) + cos(deg2rad($this->lat_a)) * cos(deg2rad($this->lat_b)) * sin(deg2rad($beta)) * sin(deg2rad($beta)) ;
          $c        = asin(min(1, sqrt($a)));
          $distance = 2*$earth_radius * $c;
          $distance = round($distance, 4);

          $this->measure = $distance;

      }
    }

Testing it with some given points which have public distances I don't get a reliable result.

I don't understand if there is an error in the original formula or in my implementation

up vote 198 down vote accepted

Not long ago I wrote an example of the haversine formula, and published it on my website:

/**
 * Calculates the great-circle distance between two points, with
 * the Haversine formula.
 * @param float $latitudeFrom Latitude of start point in [deg decimal]
 * @param float $longitudeFrom Longitude of start point in [deg decimal]
 * @param float $latitudeTo Latitude of target point in [deg decimal]
 * @param float $longitudeTo Longitude of target point in [deg decimal]
 * @param float $earthRadius Mean earth radius in [m]
 * @return float Distance between points in [m] (same as earthRadius)
 */
function haversineGreatCircleDistance(
  $latitudeFrom, $longitudeFrom, $latitudeTo, $longitudeTo, $earthRadius = 6371000)
{
  // convert from degrees to radians
  $latFrom = deg2rad($latitudeFrom);
  $lonFrom = deg2rad($longitudeFrom);
  $latTo = deg2rad($latitudeTo);
  $lonTo = deg2rad($longitudeTo);

  $latDelta = $latTo - $latFrom;
  $lonDelta = $lonTo - $lonFrom;

  $angle = 2 * asin(sqrt(pow(sin($latDelta / 2), 2) +
    cos($latFrom) * cos($latTo) * pow(sin($lonDelta / 2), 2)));
  return $angle * $earthRadius;
}

➽ Note that you get the distance back in the same unit as you pass in with the parameter $earthRadius. The default value is 6371000 meters so the result will be in [m] too. To get the result in miles, you could e.g. pass 3959 miles as $earthRadius and the result would be in [mi]. In my opinion it is a good habit to stick with the SI units, if there is no particular reason to do otherwise.

Edit:

As TreyA correctly pointed out, the Haversine formula has weaknesses with antipodal points because of rounding errors (though it is stable for small distances). To get around them, you could use the Vincenty formula instead.

/**
 * Calculates the great-circle distance between two points, with
 * the Vincenty formula.
 * @param float $latitudeFrom Latitude of start point in [deg decimal]
 * @param float $longitudeFrom Longitude of start point in [deg decimal]
 * @param float $latitudeTo Latitude of target point in [deg decimal]
 * @param float $longitudeTo Longitude of target point in [deg decimal]
 * @param float $earthRadius Mean earth radius in [m]
 * @return float Distance between points in [m] (same as earthRadius)
 */
public static function vincentyGreatCircleDistance(
  $latitudeFrom, $longitudeFrom, $latitudeTo, $longitudeTo, $earthRadius = 6371000)
{
  // convert from degrees to radians
  $latFrom = deg2rad($latitudeFrom);
  $lonFrom = deg2rad($longitudeFrom);
  $latTo = deg2rad($latitudeTo);
  $lonTo = deg2rad($longitudeTo);

  $lonDelta = $lonTo - $lonFrom;
  $a = pow(cos($latTo) * sin($lonDelta), 2) +
    pow(cos($latFrom) * sin($latTo) - sin($latFrom) * cos($latTo) * cos($lonDelta), 2);
  $b = sin($latFrom) * sin($latTo) + cos($latFrom) * cos($latTo) * cos($lonDelta);

  $angle = atan2(sqrt($a), $b);
  return $angle * $earthRadius;
}
  • 1
    @TreyA - There are different versions possible, this version implements the formula in Wikipedia and is well tested. The $angle means the angle in the middle of the world in radians, so one can multiplicate it with the earth radius. I can also provide an example of the more complex Vincenty formula if someone is interested. – martinstoeckli Apr 8 '12 at 7:43
  • @TreyA - Yes i know, i'm not sure what you want to say with that. Have you tested the function and did it calculate a wrong result? And have you looked at the formula in Wikipedia? You should really do a test of your own and give me an example of what you think is calculated wrong. – martinstoeckli Apr 8 '12 at 14:49
  • Sorry, but i have to explain some things now. 1) The question was about the Haversine formula, you should tell us if you suggest to use another formula. 2) The Haversine formula has weaknesses around the poles, but is accurate for small distances (it's a problem of the arccosine formula). 3) You stated that there is a step missing with the calculated $angle, that's simply wrong, it cannot improve the result, please please test it out! 4) I agree that it would be better to use the stable Vincenty formula, i already offered to give an example. Maybe you could write an answer as well? – martinstoeckli Apr 8 '12 at 18:00
  • @martinstoekli - you are correct, you do not have a step missing in your Haversine formula. I removed my comments as to not confuse future readers. – TreyA May 2 '12 at 12:34
  • 1
    @PratikCJoshi - Finally found the time to add a note about using different units. – martinstoeckli Aug 24 '15 at 12:06

I found this code which is giving me reliable results.

function distance($lat1, $lon1, $lat2, $lon2, $unit) {

  $theta = $lon1 - $lon2;
  $dist = sin(deg2rad($lat1)) * sin(deg2rad($lat2)) +  cos(deg2rad($lat1)) * cos(deg2rad($lat2)) * cos(deg2rad($theta));
  $dist = acos($dist);
  $dist = rad2deg($dist);
  $miles = $dist * 60 * 1.1515;
  $unit = strtoupper($unit);

  if ($unit == "K") {
      return ($miles * 1.609344);
  } else if ($unit == "N") {
      return ($miles * 0.8684);
  } else {
      return $miles;
  }
}

results :

echo distance(32.9697, -96.80322, 29.46786, -98.53506, "M") . " Miles<br>";
echo distance(32.9697, -96.80322, 29.46786, -98.53506, "K") . " Kilometers<br>";
echo distance(32.9697, -96.80322, 29.46786, -98.53506, "N") . " Nautical Miles<br>";
  • 2
    great stuff, I tried this and also google maps shows same distance only decimal changes here and there.. – Zohair Oct 30 '15 at 11:26
  • What if you want to calculate the distance between three points? – kexxcream May 19 '16 at 6:48
  • 3
    call this function two times and add them up, alternately you change the function accordingly – Janith Chinthana May 19 '16 at 7:04
  • 2
    this actually gives nearly correct results. – Chaudhry Waqas May 9 '17 at 17:58

It's just addition to @martinstoeckli and @Janith Chinthana answers. For those who curious about which algorithm is fastest i wrote the performance test. Best performance result shows optimized function from codexworld.com:

/**
 * Optimized algorithm from http://www.codexworld.com
 *
 * @param float $latitudeFrom
 * @param float $longitudeFrom
 * @param float $latitudeTo
 * @param float $longitudeTo
 *
 * @return float [km]
 */
function codexworldGetDistanceOpt($latitudeFrom, $longitudeFrom, $latitudeTo, $longitudeTo)
{
    $rad = M_PI / 180;
    //Calculate distance from latitude and longitude
    $theta = $longitudeFrom - $longitudeTo;
    $dist = sin($latitudeFrom * $rad) * sin($latitudeTo * $rad) +  cos($latitudeFrom * $rad) * cos($latitudeTo * $rad) * cos($theta * $rad);

    return acos($dist) / $rad * 60 *  1.853;
}

Here is test results:

Test name       Repeats         Result          Performance     
codexworld-opt  10000           0.084952 sec    +0.00%
codexworld      10000           0.104127 sec    -22.57%
custom          10000           0.107419 sec    -26.45%
custom2         10000           0.111576 sec    -31.34%
custom1         10000           0.136691 sec    -60.90%
vincenty        10000           0.165881 sec    -95.26%
  • In your code the multiplier for the codexworlds algorithms is 1.852, whereas the actual original is 1.1515. Why is this? Why the difference? – GotBatteries Dec 4 '17 at 11:07
  • @GotBatteries Original mulitplier is for miles. Optimized function returns result in km. 1.1515 * 1.609344 = 1.853. Thanks, fixed to 1.853. – Alexander Yancharuk Dec 4 '17 at 13:54
  • Why don't you use M_PI / 180 and $rad * 60 * 1.853 as constants for better performance? – Evren Yurtesen Dec 5 '17 at 13:40
  • @EvrenYurtesen Nice idea if your priority is performance. But maintability and readability will become more complicated i think. – Alexander Yancharuk Dec 5 '17 at 15:35
  • Just put a comment on previous line and say // M_PI / 180 ... etc. I don't know why it would make it difficult to maintain. It is not something you will ever change. – Evren Yurtesen Dec 5 '17 at 16:56

Here the simple and perfect code for calculating the distance between two latitude and longitude. The following code have been found from here - http://www.codexworld.com/distance-between-two-addresses-google-maps-api-php/

$latitudeFrom = '22.574864';
$longitudeFrom = '88.437915';

$latitudeTo = '22.568662';
$longitudeTo = '88.431918';

//Calculate distance from latitude and longitude
$theta = $longitudeFrom - $longitudeTo;
$dist = sin(deg2rad($latitudeFrom)) * sin(deg2rad($latitudeTo)) +  cos(deg2rad($latitudeFrom)) * cos(deg2rad($latitudeTo)) * cos(deg2rad($theta));
$dist = acos($dist);
$dist = rad2deg($dist);
$miles = $dist * 60 * 1.1515;

$distance = ($miles * 1.609344).' km';

For the ones who like shorter and faster(not calling deg2rad()).

function circle_distance($lat1, $lon1, $lat2, $lon2) {
  $rad = M_PI / 180;
  return acos(sin($lat2*$rad) * sin($lat1*$rad) + cos($lat2*$rad) * cos($lat1*$rad) * cos($lon2*$rad - $lon1*$rad)) * 6371;// Kilometers
}

Try this gives awesome results

function getDistance($point1_lat, $point1_long, $point2_lat, $point2_long, $unit = 'km', $decimals = 2) {
        // Calculate the distance in degrees
        $degrees = rad2deg(acos((sin(deg2rad($point1_lat))*sin(deg2rad($point2_lat))) + (cos(deg2rad($point1_lat))*cos(deg2rad($point2_lat))*cos(deg2rad($point1_long-$point2_long)))));

        // Convert the distance in degrees to the chosen unit (kilometres, miles or nautical miles)
        switch($unit) {
            case 'km':
                $distance = $degrees * 111.13384; // 1 degree = 111.13384 km, based on the average diameter of the Earth (12,735 km)
                break;
            case 'mi':
                $distance = $degrees * 69.05482; // 1 degree = 69.05482 miles, based on the average diameter of the Earth (7,913.1 miles)
                break;
            case 'nmi':
                $distance =  $degrees * 59.97662; // 1 degree = 59.97662 nautic miles, based on the average diameter of the Earth (6,876.3 nautical miles)
        }
        return round($distance, $decimals);
    }

For exact values do it like that:

public function DistAB()
{
      $delta_lat = $this->lat_b - $this->lat_a ;
      $delta_lon = $this->lon_b - $this->lon_a ;

      $a = pow(sin($delta_lat/2), 2);
      $a += cos(deg2rad($this->lat_a9)) * cos(deg2rad($this->lat_b9)) * pow(sin(deg2rad($delta_lon/29)), 2);
      $c = 2 * atan2(sqrt($a), sqrt(1-$a));

      $distance = 2 * $earth_radius * $c;
      $distance = round($distance, 4);

      $this->measure = $distance;
}

Hmm I think that should do it...

Edit:

For formulars and at least JS-implementations try: http://www.movable-type.co.uk/scripts/latlong.html

Dare me... I forgot to deg2rad all the values in the circle-functions...

  • Thanks for your answer. I've checked this implementation with a simple calculation between pointA(42,12) and pointB(43,12) using $earth_radius = 6372.795477598 I get as result 12745.591 when it should be something around 110,94 – maxdangelo Apr 7 '12 at 16:33
  • @maxdangelo Ohh sorry, I corrected the code.. – Legy Apr 7 '12 at 18:52

Hello here Code For Get Distance and Time Using Two Different Lat and Long

$url ="https://maps.googleapis.com/maps/api/distancematrix/json?units=imperial&origins=16.538048,80.613266&destinations=23.0225,72.5714";



    $ch = curl_init();
    // Disable SSL verification

    curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_SSL_VERIFYPEER, false);
    // Will return the response, if false it print the response
    curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_RETURNTRANSFER, true);
    // Set the url
    curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_URL,$url);
    // Execute
    $result=curl_exec($ch);
    // Closing
    curl_close($ch);

    $result_array=json_decode($result);
print_r($result_array);

You can check Example Below Link get time between two different locations using latitude and longitude in php

  • 3
    It might be unnecessary to call an api for something that can quite simply be found by using math. – Ivotje50 Aug 26 '16 at 10:38

The multiplier is changed at every coordinate because of the great circle distance theory as written here :

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great-circle_distance

and you can calculate the nearest value using this formula described here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great-circle_distance#Worked_example

the key is converting each degree - minute - second value to all degree value:

N 36°7.2', W 86°40.2'  N = (+) , W = (-), S = (-), E = (+) 
referencing the Greenwich meridian and Equator parallel

(phi)     36.12° = 36° + 7.2'/60' 

(lambda)  -86.67° = 86° + 40.2'/60'

protected by Community Aug 8 '16 at 9:29

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