661

I want to know the number of CPUs on the local machine using Python. The result should be user/real as output by time(1) when called with an optimally scaling userspace-only program.

2
  • 6
    You should keep cpusets (in Linux) in mind. If you're in a cpuset, the solutions below will still give the number of real CPUs in the system, not the number available to your process. /proc/<PID>/status has some lines that tell you the number of CPUs in the current cpuset: look for Cpus_allowed_list.
    – wpoely86
    Sep 30 '13 at 10:59
  • if you are using torch you can do import torch.multiprocessing; mp.cpu_count() Feb 18 at 19:03

15 Answers 15

1035

If you have python with a version >= 2.6 you can simply use

import multiprocessing

multiprocessing.cpu_count()

http://docs.python.org/library/multiprocessing.html#multiprocessing.cpu_count

11
  • 4
    multiprocessing is also supported in 3.x Jul 5 '15 at 10:36
  • 3
    I want to add that this doesn't work in IronPython which raises a NotImplementedError.
    – Matthias
    Feb 23 '16 at 15:41
  • 3
    This gives the number of CPUs on available... not in use by the program!
    – amc
    Aug 23 '17 at 23:25
  • 49
    On Python 3.6.2 I could only use os.cpu_count()
    – Achilles
    Sep 11 '17 at 19:59
  • 10
    Also, as noted below, this count can include "virtual" hyperthreaded cpus, which may not be what you want if you are scheduling cpu-intensive tasks. Jun 7 '19 at 15:21
206

If you're interested into the number of processors available to your current process, you have to check cpuset first. Otherwise (or if cpuset is not in use), multiprocessing.cpu_count() is the way to go in Python 2.6 and newer. The following method falls back to a couple of alternative methods in older versions of Python:

import os
import re
import subprocess


def available_cpu_count():
    """ Number of available virtual or physical CPUs on this system, i.e.
    user/real as output by time(1) when called with an optimally scaling
    userspace-only program"""

    # cpuset
    # cpuset may restrict the number of *available* processors
    try:
        m = re.search(r'(?m)^Cpus_allowed:\s*(.*)$',
                      open('/proc/self/status').read())
        if m:
            res = bin(int(m.group(1).replace(',', ''), 16)).count('1')
            if res > 0:
                return res
    except IOError:
        pass

    # Python 2.6+
    try:
        import multiprocessing
        return multiprocessing.cpu_count()
    except (ImportError, NotImplementedError):
        pass

    # https://github.com/giampaolo/psutil
    try:
        import psutil
        return psutil.cpu_count()   # psutil.NUM_CPUS on old versions
    except (ImportError, AttributeError):
        pass

    # POSIX
    try:
        res = int(os.sysconf('SC_NPROCESSORS_ONLN'))

        if res > 0:
            return res
    except (AttributeError, ValueError):
        pass

    # Windows
    try:
        res = int(os.environ['NUMBER_OF_PROCESSORS'])

        if res > 0:
            return res
    except (KeyError, ValueError):
        pass

    # jython
    try:
        from java.lang import Runtime
        runtime = Runtime.getRuntime()
        res = runtime.availableProcessors()
        if res > 0:
            return res
    except ImportError:
        pass

    # BSD
    try:
        sysctl = subprocess.Popen(['sysctl', '-n', 'hw.ncpu'],
                                  stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
        scStdout = sysctl.communicate()[0]
        res = int(scStdout)

        if res > 0:
            return res
    except (OSError, ValueError):
        pass

    # Linux
    try:
        res = open('/proc/cpuinfo').read().count('processor\t:')

        if res > 0:
            return res
    except IOError:
        pass

    # Solaris
    try:
        pseudoDevices = os.listdir('/devices/pseudo/')
        res = 0
        for pd in pseudoDevices:
            if re.match(r'^cpuid@[0-9]+$', pd):
                res += 1

        if res > 0:
            return res
    except OSError:
        pass

    # Other UNIXes (heuristic)
    try:
        try:
            dmesg = open('/var/run/dmesg.boot').read()
        except IOError:
            dmesgProcess = subprocess.Popen(['dmesg'], stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
            dmesg = dmesgProcess.communicate()[0]

        res = 0
        while '\ncpu' + str(res) + ':' in dmesg:
            res += 1

        if res > 0:
            return res
    except OSError:
        pass

    raise Exception('Can not determine number of CPUs on this system')
12
  • On a MacPro 1,0 running the latest Ubuntu, on an HP Laptop running a recent Debian, and on an old eMachine running an old Ubuntu, the cpus_allowed results of /proc/self/status are respectively ff, f and f--- corresponding to 8, 4 and 4 by your (correct) math. However the actual numbers of CPUs are respectively 4, 2 and 1. I find that counting the number of occurrences of the word "processor" in /proc/cpuinfo may be the better way to go. (Or do I have the question wrong?) Jul 20 '16 at 5:06
  • 1
    With some further research--- if that can be said of "Googling"--- I find from the use of /proc/cpuinfo that if for any one of the listings for each "processor" you multiply the "siblings" by the "cpu cores" you get your "Cpus_allowed" number. And I gather that the siblings refer to hyper-threading, hence your reference to "virtual". But the fact remains that your "Cpus_allowed" number is 8 on my MacPro whereas your multiprocessing.cpu_count() answer is 4. My own open('/proc/cpuinfo').read().count('processor') also produces 4, the number of physical cores (two dual-core processors). Jul 20 '16 at 6:47
  • 2
    open('/proc/self/status').read() forgets to close the file. Use with open('/proc/self/status') as f: f.read() instead
    – Tim Diels
    Mar 23 '17 at 16:36
  • 4
    os.cpu_count()
    – goetzc
    Oct 29 '17 at 17:11
  • 1
    @amcgregor In this case it's acceptable, agreed, just file handles being left open which I guess is ok if you're not writing a long running daemon/process; which I fear might end up hitting a max open file handles of the OS. It's worse when writing to a file that needs to get read again before the process ends, but that's not the case here so that's a moot point. Still a good idea to have a habit of using with for when you do encounter a case where you need it.
    – Tim Diels
    Dec 11 '18 at 17:33
108

Another option is to use the psutil library, which always turn out useful in these situations:

>>> import psutil
>>> psutil.cpu_count()
2

This should work on any platform supported by psutil(Unix and Windows).

Note that in some occasions multiprocessing.cpu_count may raise a NotImplementedError while psutil will be able to obtain the number of CPUs. This is simply because psutil first tries to use the same techniques used by multiprocessing and, if those fail, it also uses other techniques.

4
  • 7
    This one is really good, considering that used method allows to find out is the CPU cores are logical ore physical ones. psutil.cpu_count(logical = True) Oct 28 '19 at 15:18
  • Hi @Bakuriu, Is there any way to get the number of cpu cores being used by a specific process using psutil?
    – saichand
    Apr 7 '20 at 7:37
  • 2
    @Devilhunter On Windows on my Intel i7-8700 psutil.cpu_count() gives 12 (it's a 6-core CPU with hyperthreading). This is because the default argument of logical is True, so you explicitly need to write psutil.cpu_count(logical = False) to get the number of physical Cores.
    – OscarVanL
    Apr 24 '20 at 17:36
  • 2
    psutil.Process().cpu_affinity() is what most users will want I believe as explained at: stackoverflow.com/a/55423170/895245 BTW. Aug 26 '20 at 22:57
91

len(os.sched_getaffinity(0)) is what you usually want

https://docs.python.org/3/library/os.html#os.sched_getaffinity

os.sched_getaffinity(0) (added in Python 3) returns the set of CPUs available considering the sched_setaffinity Linux system call, which limits which CPUs a process and its children can run on.

0 means to get the value for the current process. The function returns a set() of allowed CPUs, thus the need for len().

multiprocessing.cpu_count() and os.cpu_count() on the other hand just returns the total number of physical CPUs.

The difference is especially important because certain cluster management systems such as Platform LSF limit job CPU usage with sched_getaffinity.

Therefore, if you use multiprocessing.cpu_count(), your script might try to use way more cores than it has available, which may lead to overload and timeouts.

We can see the difference concretely by restricting the affinity with the taskset utility, which allows us to control the affinity of a process.

Minimal taskset example

For example, if I restrict Python to just 1 core (core 0) in my 16 core system:

taskset -c 0 ./main.py

with the test script:

main.py

#!/usr/bin/env python3

import multiprocessing
import os

print(multiprocessing.cpu_count())
print(os.cpu_count())
print(len(os.sched_getaffinity(0)))

then the output is:

16
16
1

Vs nproc

nproc does respect the affinity by default and:

taskset -c 0 nproc

outputs:

1

and man nproc makes that quite explicit:

print the number of processing units available

Therefore, len(os.sched_getaffinity(0)) behaves like nproc by default.

nproc has the --all flag for the less common case that you want to get the physical CPU count without considering taskset:

taskset -c 0 nproc --all

os.cpu_count documentation

The documentation of os.cpu_count also briefly mentions this https://docs.python.org/3.8/library/os.html#os.cpu_count

This number is not equivalent to the number of CPUs the current process can use. The number of usable CPUs can be obtained with len(os.sched_getaffinity(0))

The same comment is also copied on the documentation of multiprocessing.cpu_count: https://docs.python.org/3/library/multiprocessing.html#multiprocessing.cpu_count

From the 3.8 source under Lib/multiprocessing/context.py we also see that multiprocessing.cpu_count just forwards to os.cpu_count, except that the multiprocessing one throws an exception instead of returning None if os.cpu_count fails:

    def cpu_count(self):
        '''Returns the number of CPUs in the system'''
        num = os.cpu_count()
        if num is None:
            raise NotImplementedError('cannot determine number of cpus')
        else:
            return num

3.8 availability: systems with a native sched_getaffinity function

The only downside of this os.sched_getaffinity is that this appears to be UNIX only as of Python 3.8.

cpython 3.8 seems to just try to compile a small C hello world with a sched_setaffinity function call during configuration time, and if not present HAVE_SCHED_SETAFFINITY is not set and the function will likely be missing:

psutil.Process().cpu_affinity(): third-party version with a Windows port

The third-party psutil package (pip install psutil) had been mentioned at: https://stackoverflow.com/a/14840102/895245 but not the cpu_affinity function: https://psutil.readthedocs.io/en/latest/#psutil.Process.cpu_affinity

Usage:

import psutil
print(len(psutil.Process().cpu_affinity()))

This function does the same as the standard library os.sched_getaffinity on Linux, but they have also implemented it for Windows by making a call to the GetProcessAffinityMask Windows API function:

So in other words: those Windows users have to stop being lazy and send a patch to the upstream stdlib :-)

Tested in Ubuntu 16.04, Python 3.5.2.

8
  • 6
    Only available on Unix. Jun 7 '19 at 15:24
  • 1
    Works on jupyter notebook!
    – Paul
    Sep 4 '20 at 16:58
  • Just to clarify, does this support CPU limits in Docker-ized containers, as well? Nov 5 '20 at 20:13
  • 1
    This solution is also necessary for HPC situations where a compute node might have 48 cores but you only requested 10 of them. os.cpu_count() will tell you there's 48 cores but as @CiroSantilli郝海东冠状病六四事件法轮功 says you run into all sorts of problems if you try to use that. os.sched_getaffinity(0) will report what was actually requested from the scheduler eg. PBS
    – Paul
    Dec 3 '20 at 8:09
  • 1
    @Anentropic thanks for this info, what a shame. mac users gotta look into psutil and upstream to stdlib then as well it seems then :-) Mar 11 at 20:05
57

In Python 3.4+: os.cpu_count().

multiprocessing.cpu_count() is implemented in terms of this function but raises NotImplementedError if os.cpu_count() returns None ("can't determine number of CPUs").

5
  • 6
    See also the documentation of cpu_count. len(os.sched_getaffinity(0)) might be better, depending on the purpose.
    – Albert
    Oct 8 '18 at 14:00
  • 1
    @Albert yes, the number of CPUs in the system (os.cpu_count()—what OP asks) may differ from the number of CPUs that are available to the current process (os.sched_getaffinity(0)).
    – jfs
    Oct 8 '18 at 14:13
  • I know. I just wanted to add that for other readers, who might miss this difference, to get a more complete picture from them.
    – Albert
    Oct 9 '18 at 7:41
  • 1
    Also: the os.sched_getaffinity(0) is not available on BSD, so the use of os.cpu_count() is required (without other external library, that is).
    – Cometsong
    May 14 '19 at 14:23
  • 1
    It should be noted os.sched_getaffinity does not seem to be available on Windows.
    – manu3d
    Jun 8 '19 at 12:33
48

If you want to know the number of physical cores (not virtual hyperthreaded cores), here is a platform independent solution:

psutil.cpu_count(logical=False)

https://github.com/giampaolo/psutil/blob/master/INSTALL.rst

Note that the default value for logical is True, so if you do want to include hyperthreaded cores you can use:

psutil.cpu_count()

This will give the same number as os.cpu_count() and multiprocessing.cpu_count(), neither of which have the logical keyword argument.

2
  • 5
    What is difference between a logical CPU and not not a logical one? on my laptop: psutil.cpu_count(logical=False) #4 psutil.cpu_count(logical=True) #8 and multiprocessing.cpu_count() #8
    – user305883
    Oct 14 '16 at 7:39
  • 1
    @user305883 assuming you have a x86 CPU, you have hyperthreading on this machine, i.e. each physical core corresponds to two hyperthreads ('logical' cores). Hyperthreading allows the physical core to be used to execute instructions from thread B when parts of it are idle for thread A (e.g. waiting for data being fetched from the cache or memory). Depending on your code one can get one or a few tens of percents of additional core utilization but it is far below the performance of a real physical core. Sep 18 '17 at 13:29
29

These give you the hyperthreaded CPU count

  1. multiprocessing.cpu_count()
  2. os.cpu_count()

These give you the virtual machine CPU count

  1. psutil.cpu_count()
  2. numexpr.detect_number_of_cores()

Only matters if you works on VMs.

2
  • Not really. As noted, os.cpu_count() and multiprocessing.cpu_count() will return hyperthreaded cpu counts, not the actual physical cpu count. Jun 7 '19 at 15:25
  • 2
    Yes. I reworded. It's typically # of cores x 2. What I mean is that if you are on a virtual machine, that carved out 8 cores, but your host machine is 20 core physically, first set of command give you 20, second set of command give you 8.
    – yangliu2
    Jun 7 '19 at 20:03
22

multiprocessing.cpu_count() will return the number of logical CPUs, so if you have a quad-core CPU with hyperthreading, it will return 8. If you want the number of physical CPUs, use the python bindings to hwloc:

#!/usr/bin/env python
import hwloc
topology = hwloc.Topology()
topology.load()
print topology.get_nbobjs_by_type(hwloc.OBJ_CORE)

hwloc is designed to be portable across OSes and architectures.

2
  • In this case, I want the number of logical CPUs (i.e. how many threads should I start if this program scales really well), but the answer may be helpful nonetheless.
    – phihag
    Jul 17 '14 at 22:34
  • 7
    or psutil.cpu_count(logical=False)
    – TimZaman
    Nov 30 '16 at 14:36
10

This may work for those of us who use different os/systems, but want to get the best of all worlds:

import os
workers = os.cpu_count()
if 'sched_getaffinity' in dir(os):
    workers = len(os.sched_getaffinity(0))
8

Can't figure out how to add to the code or reply to the message but here's support for jython that you can tack in before you give up:

# jython
try:
    from java.lang import Runtime
    runtime = Runtime.getRuntime()
    res = runtime.availableProcessors()
    if res > 0:
        return res
except ImportError:
    pass
0
7

You can also use "joblib" for this purpose.

import joblib
print joblib.cpu_count()

This method will give you the number of cpus in the system. joblib needs to be installed though. More information on joblib can be found here https://pythonhosted.org/joblib/parallel.html

Alternatively you can use numexpr package of python. It has lot of simple functions helpful for getting information about the system cpu.

import numexpr as ne
print ne.detect_number_of_cores()
1
  • 1
    joblib uses the underlying multiprocessing module. It's probably best to call into multiprocessing directly for this.
    – ogrisel
    Feb 27 '17 at 14:55
7

For python version above 3.4 you can use

import os
os.cpu_count()

If you are looking for an equivanlent of linux command nproc. You have this option

len(os.sched_getaffinity(0))
1

Another option if you don't have Python 2.6:

import commands
n = commands.getoutput("grep -c processor /proc/cpuinfo")
1
  • 2
    Thanks! This is only available on Linux though, and already included in my answer.
    – phihag
    Aug 29 '14 at 20:36
1

If you are using torch you can do:

import torch.multiprocessing as mp

mp.cpu_count()

the mp library in torch has the same interface as the main python one so you can do this too as the commenter mentioned:

python -c "import multiprocessing; print(multiprocessing.cpu_count())"

hope this helps! ;) it's always nice to have more than 1 option.

2
  • 2
    This answer should NOT be the first answer. Why to use torch, a deep learning framework, for a such easy task? Just run: python -c "import multiprocessing; print(multiprocessing.cpu_count())" May 17 at 11:40
  • @EliSimhayev oh I forgot that actually the torch mp module has the same interface so they are the same but will add details ;) and no it's not the first answer, there are some before me :) May 17 at 15:37
-1

If you are looking for printing the number of cores in your system.

Try this:

import os 
no_of_cores = os.cpu_count()
print(no_of_cores)

This should help.

2
  • 1
    This solution is already provided in this existing answer. When answering old questions, please ensure that your answer provides a distinct and valuable contribution to the Q&A. 2 days ago
  • ok thanks will provide suitable information. 2 days ago

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