394

I want to know the number of CPUs on the local machine using Python. The result should be user/real as output by time(1) when called with an optimally scaling userspace-only program.

  • 3
    You should keep cpusets (in Linux) in mind. If you're in a cpuset, the solutions below will still give the number of real CPUs in the system, not the number available to your process. /proc/<PID>/status has some lines that tell you the number of CPUs in the current cpuset: look for Cpus_allowed_list. – wpoely86 Sep 30 '13 at 10:59

11 Answers 11

684

If you have python with a version >= 2.6 you can simply use

import multiprocessing

multiprocessing.cpu_count()

http://docs.python.org/library/multiprocessing.html#multiprocessing.cpu_count

  • 2
    @Casey Yes, it does, using sysctl -n. – phihag Jul 30 '09 at 14:27
  • 1
    multiprocessing is also supported in 3.x – LittleByBlue Jul 5 '15 at 10:36
  • 3
    I want to add that this doesn't work in IronPython which raises a NotImplementedError. – Matthias Feb 23 '16 at 15:41
  • 1
    This gives the number of CPUs on available... not in use by the program! – amc Aug 23 '17 at 23:25
  • 4
    On Python 3.6.2 I could only use os.cpu_count() – Achilles Sep 11 '17 at 19:59
156

If you're interested into the number of processors available to your current process, you have to check cpuset first. Otherwise (or if cpuset is not in use), multiprocessing.cpu_count() is the way to go in Python 2.6 and newer. The following method falls back to a couple of alternative methods in older versions of Python:

import os
import re
import subprocess


def available_cpu_count():
    """ Number of available virtual or physical CPUs on this system, i.e.
    user/real as output by time(1) when called with an optimally scaling
    userspace-only program"""

    # cpuset
    # cpuset may restrict the number of *available* processors
    try:
        m = re.search(r'(?m)^Cpus_allowed:\s*(.*)$',
                      open('/proc/self/status').read())
        if m:
            res = bin(int(m.group(1).replace(',', ''), 16)).count('1')
            if res > 0:
                return res
    except IOError:
        pass

    # Python 2.6+
    try:
        import multiprocessing
        return multiprocessing.cpu_count()
    except (ImportError, NotImplementedError):
        pass

    # https://github.com/giampaolo/psutil
    try:
        import psutil
        return psutil.cpu_count()   # psutil.NUM_CPUS on old versions
    except (ImportError, AttributeError):
        pass

    # POSIX
    try:
        res = int(os.sysconf('SC_NPROCESSORS_ONLN'))

        if res > 0:
            return res
    except (AttributeError, ValueError):
        pass

    # Windows
    try:
        res = int(os.environ['NUMBER_OF_PROCESSORS'])

        if res > 0:
            return res
    except (KeyError, ValueError):
        pass

    # jython
    try:
        from java.lang import Runtime
        runtime = Runtime.getRuntime()
        res = runtime.availableProcessors()
        if res > 0:
            return res
    except ImportError:
        pass

    # BSD
    try:
        sysctl = subprocess.Popen(['sysctl', '-n', 'hw.ncpu'],
                                  stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
        scStdout = sysctl.communicate()[0]
        res = int(scStdout)

        if res > 0:
            return res
    except (OSError, ValueError):
        pass

    # Linux
    try:
        res = open('/proc/cpuinfo').read().count('processor\t:')

        if res > 0:
            return res
    except IOError:
        pass

    # Solaris
    try:
        pseudoDevices = os.listdir('/devices/pseudo/')
        res = 0
        for pd in pseudoDevices:
            if re.match(r'^cpuid@[0-9]+$', pd):
                res += 1

        if res > 0:
            return res
    except OSError:
        pass

    # Other UNIXes (heuristic)
    try:
        try:
            dmesg = open('/var/run/dmesg.boot').read()
        except IOError:
            dmesgProcess = subprocess.Popen(['dmesg'], stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
            dmesg = dmesgProcess.communicate()[0]

        res = 0
        while '\ncpu' + str(res) + ':' in dmesg:
            res += 1

        if res > 0:
            return res
    except OSError:
        pass

    raise Exception('Can not determine number of CPUs on this system')
  • 1
    I guess you mean subprocess.PIPE and not Popen.PIPE, right? – Eric O Lebigot Jun 17 '09 at 14:52
  • @EOL Yes, of course. Looks like a replace gone wild. Corrected. – phihag Jun 17 '09 at 15:41
  • 1
    open('/proc/self/status').read() forgets to close the file. Use with open('/proc/self/status') as f: f.read() instead – timdiels Mar 23 '17 at 16:36
  • 1
    os.cpu_count() – goetzc Oct 29 '17 at 17:11
  • 1
    @amcgregor In this case it's acceptable, agreed, just file handles being left open which I guess is ok if you're not writing a long running daemon/process; which I fear might end up hitting a max open file handles of the OS. It's worse when writing to a file that needs to get read again before the process ends, but that's not the case here so that's a moot point. Still a good idea to have a habit of using with for when you do encounter a case where you need it. – timdiels Dec 11 '18 at 17:33
69

Another option is to use the psutil library, which always turn out useful in these situations:

>>> import psutil
>>> psutil.cpu_count()
2

This should work on any platform supported by psutil(Unix and Windows).

Note that in some occasions multiprocessing.cpu_count may raise a NotImplementedError while psutil will be able to obtain the number of CPUs. This is simply because psutil first tries to use the same techniques used by multiprocessing and, if those fail, it also uses other techniques.

32

In Python 3.4+: os.cpu_count().

multiprocessing.cpu_count() is implemented in terms of this function but raises NotImplementedError if os.cpu_count() returns None ("can't determine number of CPUs").

  • 1
    See also the documentation of cpu_count. len(os.sched_getaffinity(0)) might be better, depending on the purpose. – Albert Oct 8 '18 at 14:00
  • @Albert yes, the number of CPUs in the system (os.cpu_count()—what OP asks) may differ from the number of CPUs that are available to the current process (os.sched_getaffinity(0)). – jfs Oct 8 '18 at 14:13
  • I know. I just wanted to add that for other readers, who might miss this difference, to get a more complete picture from them. – Albert Oct 9 '18 at 7:41
24

platform independent:

psutil.cpu_count(logical=False)

https://github.com/giampaolo/psutil/blob/master/INSTALL.rst

  • 3
    What is difference between a logical CPU and not not a logical one? on my laptop: psutil.cpu_count(logical=False) #4 psutil.cpu_count(logical=True) #8 and multiprocessing.cpu_count() #8 – user305883 Oct 14 '16 at 7:39
  • 3
    a logical is a 'simulated cpu': en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyper-threading – Davoud Taghawi-Nejad Dec 5 '16 at 13:19
  • 1
    @user305883 assuming you have a x86 CPU, you have hyperthreading on this machine, i.e. each physical core corresponds to two hyperthreads ('logical' cores). Hyperthreading allows the physical core to be used to execute instructions from thread B when parts of it are idle for thread A (e.g. waiting for data being fetched from the cache or memory). Depending on your code one can get one or a few tens of percents of additional core utilization but it is far below the performance of a real physical core. – Andre Holzner Sep 18 '17 at 13:29
22
import os

print(os.cpu_count())
  • Not avaible on python 2 (only for python 3) – A STEFANI Nov 28 '18 at 6:10
15

multiprocessing.cpu_count() will return the number of logical CPUs, so if you have a quad-core CPU with hyperthreading, it will return 8. If you want the number of physical CPUs, use the python bindings to hwloc:

#!/usr/bin/env python
import hwloc
topology = hwloc.Topology()
topology.load()
print topology.get_nbobjs_by_type(hwloc.OBJ_CORE)

hwloc is designed to be portable across OSes and architectures.

  • In this case, I want the number of logical CPUs (i.e. how many threads should I start if this program scales really well), but the answer may be helpful nonetheless. – phihag Jul 17 '14 at 22:34
  • 6
    or psutil.cpu_count(logical=False) – TimZaman Nov 30 '16 at 14:36
7

Can't figure out how to add to the code or reply to the message but here's support for jython that you can tack in before you give up:

# jython
try:
    from java.lang import Runtime
    runtime = Runtime.getRuntime()
    res = runtime.availableProcessors()
    if res > 0:
        return res
except ImportError:
    pass
3

You can also use "joblib" for this purpose.

import joblib
print joblib.cpu_count()

This method will give you the number of cpus in the system. joblib needs to be installed though. More information on joblib can be found here https://pythonhosted.org/joblib/parallel.html

Alternatively you can use numexpr package of python. It has lot of simple functions helpful for getting information about the system cpu.

import numexpr as ne
print ne.detect_number_of_cores()
  • joblib uses the underlying multiprocessing module. It's probably best to call into multiprocessing directly for this. – ogrisel Feb 27 '17 at 14:55
0

Another option if you don't have Python 2.6:

import commands
n = commands.getoutput("grep -c processor /proc/cpuinfo")
  • 2
    Thanks! This is only available on Linux though, and already included in my answer. – phihag Aug 29 '14 at 20:36
0

This is the function cpu_count from multiprocessing

:}

import os
import sys

def cpu_count():
    '''
    Returns the number of CPUs in the system
    '''
    if sys.platform == 'win32':
        try:
            num = int(os.environ['NUMBER_OF_PROCESSORS'])
        except (ValueError, KeyError):
            num = 0
    elif 'bsd' in sys.platform or sys.platform == 'darwin':
        comm = '/sbin/sysctl -n hw.ncpu'
        if sys.platform == 'darwin':
            comm = '/usr' + comm
        try:
            with os.popen(comm) as p:
                num = int(p.read())
        except ValueError:
            num = 0
    else:
        try:
            num = os.sysconf('SC_NPROCESSORS_ONLN')
        except (ValueError, OSError, AttributeError):
           num = 0

    if num >= 1:
        return num
    else:
        raise NotImplementedError('cannot determine number of cpus')

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