88

I'm coding up a page where I only want to use raw JavaScript code for UI without any interference of plugins or frameworks.

And now I'm struggling with finding a way to scroll over the page smoothly without jQuery.

4
  • 3
    The same way jQuery would do it. Break the animation up into a series of very small steps, use an interval timer at a small interval to perform each of these steps in turn until they are done.
    – tvanfosson
    Apr 8 '12 at 14:08
  • I thought of this solution at the beginning and the only point I missed is actually in Kamal's link below, which is how to calculate the Y-positions of objects. Thanks tvanfosson :)
    – user743234
    Apr 8 '12 at 14:12
  • Please take a look at my answer on smooth scrolling with plain js
    – surfmuggle
    Jul 18 '13 at 19:05
  • This is similar to one of my questions. Check out stackoverflow.com/questions/40598955/….
    – Cannicide
    Nov 14 '16 at 22:48

15 Answers 15

48

Native browser smooth scrolling in JavaScript is like this:

// scroll to specific values,
// same as window.scroll() method.
// for scrolling a particular distance, use window.scrollBy().
window.scroll({
  top: 2500, 
  left: 0, 
  behavior: 'smooth' 
});

// scroll certain amounts from current position 
window.scrollBy({ 
  top: 100, // negative value acceptable
  left: 0, 
  behavior: 'smooth' 
});

// scroll to a certain element
document.querySelector('.hello').scrollIntoView({ 
  behavior: 'smooth' 
});
5
28

Try this smooth scrolling demo, or an algorithm like:

  1. Get the current top location using self.pageYOffset
  2. Get the position of element till where you want to scroll to: element.offsetTop
  3. Do a for loop to reach there, which will be quite fast or use a timer to do smooth scroll till that position using window.scrollTo

See also the other popular answer to this question.


Andrew Johnson's original code:

function currentYPosition() {
    // Firefox, Chrome, Opera, Safari
    if (self.pageYOffset) return self.pageYOffset;
    // Internet Explorer 6 - standards mode
    if (document.documentElement && document.documentElement.scrollTop)
        return document.documentElement.scrollTop;
    // Internet Explorer 6, 7 and 8
    if (document.body.scrollTop) return document.body.scrollTop;
    return 0;
}


function elmYPosition(eID) {
    var elm = document.getElementById(eID);
    var y = elm.offsetTop;
    var node = elm;
    while (node.offsetParent && node.offsetParent != document.body) {
        node = node.offsetParent;
        y += node.offsetTop;
    } return y;
}


function smoothScroll(eID) {
    var startY = currentYPosition();
    var stopY = elmYPosition(eID);
    var distance = stopY > startY ? stopY - startY : startY - stopY;
    if (distance < 100) {
        scrollTo(0, stopY); return;
    }
    var speed = Math.round(distance / 100);
    if (speed >= 20) speed = 20;
    var step = Math.round(distance / 25);
    var leapY = stopY > startY ? startY + step : startY - step;
    var timer = 0;
    if (stopY > startY) {
        for ( var i=startY; i<stopY; i+=step ) {
            setTimeout("window.scrollTo(0, "+leapY+")", timer * speed);
            leapY += step; if (leapY > stopY) leapY = stopY; timer++;
        } return;
    }
    for ( var i=startY; i>stopY; i-=step ) {
        setTimeout("window.scrollTo(0, "+leapY+")", timer * speed);
        leapY -= step; if (leapY < stopY) leapY = stopY; timer++;
    }
}

Related links:

2
  • 2
    Good outline but please don't create a string to execute for the timeout, go ahead and create an anonymous function that calls the actual function.
    – tvanfosson
    Apr 8 '12 at 14:10
  • @nness it's a shame. I really wanted to see the code.
    – dzny
    Jul 23 '14 at 18:49
24

Algorithm

Scrolling an element requires changing its scrollTop value over time. For a given point in time, calculate a new scrollTop value. To animate smoothly, interpolate using a smooth-step algorithm.

Calculate scrollTop as follows:

var point = smooth_step(start_time, end_time, now);
var scrollTop = Math.round(start_top + (distance * point));

Where:

  • start_time is the time the animation started;
  • end_time is when the animation will end (start_time + duration);
  • start_top is the scrollTop value at the beginning; and
  • distance is the difference between the desired end value and the start value (target - start_top).

A robust solution should detect when animating is interrupted, and more. Read my post about Smooth Scrolling without jQuery for details.

Demo

See the JSFiddle.

Implementation

The code:

/**
    Smoothly scroll element to the given target (element.scrollTop)
    for the given duration

    Returns a promise that's fulfilled when done, or rejected if
    interrupted
 */
var smooth_scroll_to = function(element, target, duration) {
    target = Math.round(target);
    duration = Math.round(duration);
    if (duration < 0) {
        return Promise.reject("bad duration");
    }
    if (duration === 0) {
        element.scrollTop = target;
        return Promise.resolve();
    }

    var start_time = Date.now();
    var end_time = start_time + duration;

    var start_top = element.scrollTop;
    var distance = target - start_top;

    // based on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smoothstep
    var smooth_step = function(start, end, point) {
        if(point <= start) { return 0; }
        if(point >= end) { return 1; }
        var x = (point - start) / (end - start); // interpolation
        return x*x*(3 - 2*x);
    }

    return new Promise(function(resolve, reject) {
        // This is to keep track of where the element's scrollTop is
        // supposed to be, based on what we're doing
        var previous_top = element.scrollTop;

        // This is like a think function from a game loop
        var scroll_frame = function() {
            if(element.scrollTop != previous_top) {
                reject("interrupted");
                return;
            }

            // set the scrollTop for this frame
            var now = Date.now();
            var point = smooth_step(start_time, end_time, now);
            var frameTop = Math.round(start_top + (distance * point));
            element.scrollTop = frameTop;

            // check if we're done!
            if(now >= end_time) {
                resolve();
                return;
            }

            // If we were supposed to scroll but didn't, then we
            // probably hit the limit, so consider it done; not
            // interrupted.
            if(element.scrollTop === previous_top
                && element.scrollTop !== frameTop) {
                resolve();
                return;
            }
            previous_top = element.scrollTop;

            // schedule next frame for execution
            setTimeout(scroll_frame, 0);
        }

        // boostrap the animation process
        setTimeout(scroll_frame, 0);
    });
}
2
  • This seems like a really good solution. But how can you implement it on window object instead of an element like you have in your Fiddle?
    – Mudlabs
    Dec 20 '16 at 0:44
  • Never mind I figured it out. Had to use pageYOffset and scrollTo() on element instead of scrollTop.
    – Mudlabs
    Dec 20 '16 at 22:10
6

I've made an example without jQuery here : http://codepen.io/sorinnn/pen/ovzdq

/**
    by Nemes Ioan Sorin - not an jQuery big fan 
    therefore this script is for those who love the old clean coding style  
    @id = the id of the element who need to bring  into view

    Note : this demo scrolls about 12.700 pixels from Link1 to Link3
*/
(function()
{
      window.setTimeout = window.setTimeout; //
})();

      var smoothScr = {
      iterr : 30, // set timeout miliseconds ..decreased with 1ms for each iteration
        tm : null, //timeout local variable
      stopShow: function()
      {
        clearTimeout(this.tm); // stopp the timeout
        this.iterr = 30; // reset milisec iterator to original value
      },
      getRealTop : function (el) // helper function instead of jQuery
      {
        var elm = el; 
        var realTop = 0;
        do
        {
          realTop += elm.offsetTop;
          elm = elm.offsetParent;
        }
        while(elm);
        return realTop;
      },
      getPageScroll : function()  // helper function instead of jQuery
      {
        var pgYoff = window.pageYOffset || document.body.scrollTop || document.documentElement.scrollTop;
        return pgYoff;
      },
      anim : function (id) // the main func
      {
        this.stopShow(); // for click on another button or link
        var eOff, pOff, tOff, scrVal, pos, dir, step;

        eOff = document.getElementById(id).offsetTop; // element offsetTop

        tOff =  this.getRealTop(document.getElementById(id).parentNode); // terminus point 

        pOff = this.getPageScroll(); // page offsetTop

        if (pOff === null || isNaN(pOff) || pOff === 'undefined') pOff = 0;

        scrVal = eOff - pOff; // actual scroll value;

        if (scrVal > tOff) 
        {
          pos = (eOff - tOff - pOff); 
          dir = 1;
        }
        if (scrVal < tOff)
        {
          pos = (pOff + tOff) - eOff;
          dir = -1; 
        }
        if(scrVal !== tOff) 
        {
          step = ~~((pos / 4) +1) * dir;

          if(this.iterr > 1) this.iterr -= 1; 
          else this.itter = 0; // decrease the timeout timer value but not below 0
          window.scrollBy(0, step);
          this.tm = window.setTimeout(function()
          {
             smoothScr.anim(id);  
          }, this.iterr); 
        }  
        if(scrVal === tOff) 
        { 
          this.stopShow(); // reset function values
          return;
        }
    }
 }
4
  • 1
    Please post the relevant code snippits or description of how it works here. Your answer should be able to make sense without my needing to click anything. Thank you!
    – Edward
    May 20 '14 at 21:40
  • thanks - but no - codeopen is made for sharing examples - here is not the right place to put all css / js / html code - util stackoverflow will add the necessary bits - most peoples will send you to codepen / jsfiddle / or elsewhere ..
    – SorinN
    Jun 10 '14 at 17:30
  • 1
    Here's some of the conversation on why we ask for that: meta.stackexchange.com/q/149890
    – Edward
    Jun 11 '14 at 22:03
  • 2
    I don't understand the need of window.setTimeout = window.setTimeout;
    – pmrotule
    Mar 9 '17 at 8:27
6

Modern browsers has support for CSS "scroll-behavior: smooth" property. So, we even don't need any Javascript at all for this. Just add this to the body element, and use usual anchors and links. scroll-behavior MDN docs

3
  • Both Edge and Safari are not supporting this property yet. I hope they will soon.
    – 6754534367
    Feb 13 '19 at 0:40
  • It doesn't work well.. even in Firefox. So it is not a solution.
    – huseyin39
    Dec 16 '19 at 21:56
  • has only a single speed. it sucks.
    – StayCool
    Feb 16 '21 at 15:34
5

I recently set out to solve this problem in a situation where jQuery wasn't an option, so I'm logging my solution here just for posterity.

var scroll = (function() {

    var elementPosition = function(a) {
        return function() {
            return a.getBoundingClientRect().top;
        };
    };

    var scrolling = function( elementID ) {

        var el = document.getElementById( elementID ),
            elPos = elementPosition( el ),
            duration = 400,
            increment = Math.round( Math.abs( elPos() )/40 ),
            time = Math.round( duration/increment ),
            prev = 0,
            E;

        function scroller() {
            E = elPos();

            if (E === prev) {
                return;
            } else {
                prev = E;
            }

            increment = (E > -20 && E < 20) ? ((E > - 5 && E < 5) ? 1 : 5) : increment;

            if (E > 1 || E < -1) {

                if (E < 0) {
                    window.scrollBy( 0,-increment );
                } else {
                    window.scrollBy( 0,increment );
                }

                setTimeout(scroller, time);

            } else {

                el.scrollTo( 0,0 );

            }
        }

        scroller();
    };

    return {
        To: scrolling
    }

})();

/* usage */
scroll.To('elementID');

The scroll() function uses the Revealing Module Pattern to pass the target element's id to its scrolling() function, via scroll.To('id'), which sets the values used by the scroller() function.

Breakdown

In scrolling():

  • el : the target DOM object
  • elPos : returns a function via elememtPosition() which gives the position of the target element relative to the top of the page each time it's called.
  • duration : transition time in milliseconds.
  • increment : divides the starting position of the target element into 40 steps.
  • time : sets the timing of each step.
  • prev : the target element's previous position in scroller().
  • E : holds the target element's position in scroller().

The actual work is done by the scroller() function which continues to call itself (via setTimeout()) until the target element is at the top of the page or the page can scroll no more.

Each time scroller() is called it checks the current position of the target element (held in variable E) and if that is > 1 OR < -1 and if the page is still scrollable shifts the window by increment pixels - up or down depending if E is a positive or negative value. When E is neither > 1 OR < -1, or E === prev the function stops. I added the DOMElement.scrollTo() method on completion just to make sure the target element was bang on the top of the window (not that you'd notice it being out by a fraction of a pixel!).

The if statement on line 2 of scroller() checks to see if the page is scrolling (in cases where the target might be towards the bottom of the page and the page can scroll no further) by checking E against its previous position (prev).

The ternary condition below it reduce the increment value as E approaches zero. This stops the page overshooting one way and then bouncing back to overshoot the other, and then bouncing back to overshoot the other again, ping-pong style, to infinity and beyond.

If your page is more that c.4000px high you might want to increase the values in the ternary expression's first condition (here at +/-20) and/or the divisor which sets the increment value (here at 40).

Playing about with duration, the divisor which sets increment, and the values in the ternary condition of scroller() should allow you to tailor the function to suit your page.

  • JSFiddle

  • N.B.Tested in up-to-date versions of Firefox and Chrome on Lubuntu, and Firefox, Chrome and IE on Windows8.

5

You can use the new Scroll Behaviour CSS Property.

for example, add the below line to your CSS.

html{
    scroll-behavior:smooth;
}

and this will result in a native smooth scrolling feature.

see demo here

All modern browsers support the scroll-behavior property.

Read More about Scroll behavior

2

I've made something like this. I have no idea if its working in IE8. Tested in IE9, Mozilla, Chrome, Edge.

function scroll(toElement, speed) {
  var windowObject = window;
  var windowPos = windowObject.pageYOffset;
  var pointer = toElement.getAttribute('href').slice(1);
  var elem = document.getElementById(pointer);
  var elemOffset = elem.offsetTop;

  var counter = setInterval(function() {
    windowPos;

    if (windowPos > elemOffset) { // from bottom to top
      windowObject.scrollTo(0, windowPos);
      windowPos -= speed;

      if (windowPos <= elemOffset) { // scrolling until elemOffset is higher than scrollbar position, cancel interval and set scrollbar to element position
        clearInterval(counter);
        windowObject.scrollTo(0, elemOffset);
      }
    } else { // from top to bottom
      windowObject.scrollTo(0, windowPos);
      windowPos += speed;

      if (windowPos >= elemOffset) { // scroll until scrollbar is lower than element, cancel interval and set scrollbar to element position
        clearInterval(counter);
        windowObject.scrollTo(0, elemOffset);
      }
    }

  }, 1);
}

//call example

var navPointer = document.getElementsByClassName('nav__anchor');

for (i = 0; i < navPointer.length; i++) {
  navPointer[i].addEventListener('click', function(e) {
    scroll(this, 18);
    e.preventDefault();
  });
}

Description

  • pointer—get element and chceck if it has attribute "href" if yes, get rid of "#"
  • elem—pointer variable without "#"
  • elemOffset—offset of "scroll to" element from the top of the page
2

You can use

document.querySelector('your-element').scrollIntoView({behavior: 'smooth'});

If you want to scroll top the top of the page, you can just place an empty element in the top, and smooth scroll to that one.

0
<script>
var set = 0;

function animatescroll(x, y) {
    if (set == 0) {
        var val72 = 0;
        var val73 = 0;
        var setin = 0;
        set = 1;

        var interval = setInterval(function() {
            if (setin == 0) {
                val72++;
                val73 += x / 1000;
                if (val72 == 1000) {
                    val73 = 0;
                    interval = clearInterval(interval);
                }
                document.getElementById(y).scrollTop = val73;
            }
        }, 1);
    }
}
</script>

x = scrollTop
y = id of the div that is used to scroll

Note: For making the body to scroll give the body an ID.

0

Here is my solution. Works in most browsers

document.getElementById("scrollHere").scrollIntoView({behavior: "smooth"});

Docs

document.getElementById("end").scrollIntoView({behavior: "smooth"});
body {margin: 0px; display: block; height: 100%; background-image: linear-gradient(red, yellow);}
.start {display: block; margin: 100px 10px 1000px 0px;}
.end {display: block; margin: 0px 0px 100px 0px;}
<div class="start">Start</div>
<div class="end" id="end">End</div>

0

With using the following smooth scrolling is working fine:

html {
  scroll-behavior: smooth;
}

0

There are many different methods for smooth scrolling in JavaScript. The most common ones are listed below.


To scroll to a certain position in an exact amount of time, window.requestAnimationFrame can be put to use, calculating the appropriate current position each time. setTimeout can be used to a similar effect when requestAnimationFrame is not supported. (To scroll to a specific element with the function below, just set the position to element.offsetTop.)

/*
   @param pos: the y-position to scroll to (in pixels)
   @param time: the exact amount of time the scrolling will take (in milliseconds)
*/
function scrollToSmoothly(pos, time) {
    var currentPos = window.pageYOffset;
    var start = null;
    if(time == null) time = 500;
    pos = +pos, time = +time;
    window.requestAnimationFrame(function step(currentTime) {
        start = !start ? currentTime : start;
        var progress = currentTime - start;
        if (currentPos < pos) {
            window.scrollTo(0, ((pos - currentPos) * progress / time) + currentPos);
        } else {
            window.scrollTo(0, currentPos - ((currentPos - pos) * progress / time));
        }
        if (progress < time) {
            window.requestAnimationFrame(step);
        } else {
            window.scrollTo(0, pos);
        }
    });
}

Demo:

/*
   @param time: the exact amount of time the scrolling will take (in milliseconds)
   @param pos: the y-position to scroll to (in pixels)
*/
function scrollToSmoothly(pos, time) {
    var currentPos = window.pageYOffset;
    var start = null;
    if(time == null) time = 500;
    pos = +pos, time = +time;
    window.requestAnimationFrame(function step(currentTime) {
        start = !start ? currentTime : start;
        var progress = currentTime - start;
        if (currentPos < pos) {
            window.scrollTo(0, ((pos - currentPos) * progress / time) + currentPos);
        } else {
            window.scrollTo(0, currentPos - ((currentPos - pos) * progress / time));
        }
        if (progress < time) {
            window.requestAnimationFrame(step);
        } else {
            window.scrollTo(0, pos);
        }
    });
}
<button onClick="scrollToSmoothly(document.querySelector('div').offsetTop, 300)">
Scroll To Div (300ms)
</button>
<button onClick="scrollToSmoothly(document.querySelector('div').offsetTop, 200)">
Scroll To Div (200ms)
</button>
<button onClick="scrollToSmoothly(document.querySelector('div').offsetTop, 100)">
Scroll To Div (100ms)
</button>
<button onClick="scrollToSmoothly(document.querySelector('div').offsetTop, 50)">
Scroll To Div (50ms)
</button>
<button onClick="scrollToSmoothly(document.querySelector('div').offsetTop, 1000)">
Scroll To Div (1000ms)
</button>
<div style="margin: 500px 0px;">
DIV<p/>
<button onClick="scrollToSmoothly(0, 500)">
Back To Top
</button>
<button onClick="scrollToSmoothly(document.body.scrollHeight)">
Scroll To Bottom
</button>
</div>
<div style="margin: 500px 0px;">
</div>
<button style="margin-top: 100px;" onClick="scrollToSmoothly(500, 3000)">
Scroll To y-position 500px (3000ms)
</button>

For more complex cases, the SmoothScroll.js library can be used, which handles smooth scrolling both vertically and horizontally, scrolling inside other container elements, different easing behaviors, scrolling relatively from the current position, and more.

var easings = document.getElementById("easings");
for(var key in smoothScroll.easing){
    if(smoothScroll.easing.hasOwnProperty(key)){
        var option = document.createElement('option');
        option.text = option.value = key;
        easings.add(option);
    }
}
document.getElementById('to-bottom').addEventListener('click', function(e){
    smoothScroll({yPos: 'end', easing: easings.value, duration: 2000});
});
document.getElementById('to-top').addEventListener('click', function(e){
    smoothScroll({yPos: 'start', easing: easings.value, duration: 2000});
});
<script src="https://cdn.jsdelivr.net/gh/LieutenantPeacock/SmoothScroll@1.2.0/src/smoothscroll.min.js" integrity="sha384-UdJHYJK9eDBy7vML0TvJGlCpvrJhCuOPGTc7tHbA+jHEgCgjWpPbmMvmd/2bzdXU" crossorigin="anonymous"></script>
<!-- Taken from one of the library examples -->
Easing: <select id="easings"></select>
<button id="to-bottom">Scroll To Bottom</button>
<br>
<button id="to-top" style="margin-top: 5000px;">Scroll To Top</button>

Alternatively, you can pass an options object to window.scroll which scrolls to a specific x and y position and window.scrollBy which scrolls a certain amount from the current position:

// Scroll to specific values
// scrollTo is the same
window.scroll({
  top: 2500, 
  left: 0, 
  behavior: 'smooth' 
});

// Scroll certain amounts from current position 
window.scrollBy({ 
  top: 100, // could be negative value
  left: 0, 
  behavior: 'smooth' 
});

Demo:

<button onClick="scrollToDiv()">Scroll To Element</button>
<div style="margin: 500px 0px;">Div</div>
<script>
function scrollToDiv(){
var elem = document.querySelector("div");
window.scroll({
      top: elem.offsetTop, 
      left: 0, 
      behavior: 'smooth' 
});
}
</script>

If you only need to scroll to an element, not a specific position in the document, you can use Element.scrollIntoView with behavior set to smooth.

document.getElementById("elemID").scrollIntoView({ 
  behavior: 'smooth' 
});

Demo:

<button onClick="scrollToDiv()">Scroll To Element</button>
<div id="myDiv" style="margin: 500px 0px;">Div</div>
<script>
function scrollToDiv(){
    document.getElementById("myDiv").scrollIntoView({ 
      behavior: 'smooth' 
   });
}
</script>

Modern browsers support the scroll-behavior CSS property, which can be used to make scrolling in the document smooth (without the need for JavaScript). Anchor tags can be used for this by giving the anchor tag a href of # plus the id of the element to scroll to). You can also set the scroll-behavior property for a specific container like a div to make its contents scroll smoothly.

Demo:

html, body{
  scroll-behavior: smooth;
}
<a href="#elem">Scroll To Element</a>
<div id="elem" style="margin: 500px 0px;">Div</div>

0

Here's my variation:

let MenuItem = function ( _menuItem ) {

    // I had a sticky header, so its height had to be taken into account when scrolling
    let _header = document.querySelector('.site-header');

    let _scrollToBlock = function( e, menuItem ) {

            let id = menuItem.getAttribute('href'), // the href attribute stores the id of the block to which the scroll will be
                headerHeight = _header.offsetHeight; // determine the height of the header
            id = id.replace(/#/, ''); // remove the # sign from the id block
            let elem = document.getElementById( id ), // define the element to which we will scroll
                top = elem.getBoundingClientRect().top + window.scrollY - headerHeight; // determine the height of the scroll
            window.scroll({
                top: top,
                left: 0,
                behavior: 'smooth'
            });

        },
        _addEvents = function() {

            _menuItem.addEventListener('click', function (e){
                e.preventDefault(); // Disable redirect on click
                _scrollToBlock(e, _menuItem);
            });

        },
        _init = function() {
            _addEvents();
        };

    _init();

};

// Initialize the class MenuItem to all links with class .menu__item
document.querySelectorAll('.menu__item').forEach( function(item) {
    new MenuItem(item);
} );
-1

Here's the code that worked for me.

`$('a[href*="#"]')

    .not('[href="#"]')
    .not('[href="#0"]')
    .click(function(event) {
     if (
       location.pathname.replace(/^\//, '') == this.pathname.replace(/^\//, '')
       &&
       location.hostname == this.hostname
        ) {

  var target = $(this.hash);
  target = target.length ? target : $('[name=' + this.hash.slice(1) + ']');
  if (target.length) {

    event.preventDefault();
    $('html, body').animate({
      scrollTop: target.offset().top
    }, 1000, function() {

      var $target = $(target);
      $target.focus();
      if ($target.is(":focus")) { 
        return false;
      } else {
        $target.attr('tabindex','-1'); 
        $target.focus(); 
      };
    });
    }
   }
  });

`

2
  • can you explain a little more about what your code does?
    – rhavelka
    Jun 4 '20 at 14:38
  • 2
    Welcome to stackoverflow, thank you for answering but the question was about not using jquery.
    – Stephane L
    Jun 4 '20 at 14:40

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