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How can I create a Zerofilled value using JavaScript?

In JavaScript, I need to have padding.

For example, if I have the number 9, it will be "0009". If I have a number of say 10, it will be "0010". Notice how it will always contain four digits.

One way to do this would be to subtract the number minus 4 to get the number of 0s I need to put.

Is there was a slicker way of doing this?

marked as duplicate by CD.., Patrick McElhaney, epascarello, Phrogz, Josh Caswell Apr 9 '12 at 20:34

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 245
    ("0000" + num).substr(-4,4); //short and sweet – slartibartfast Mar 4 '14 at 7:31
  • 172
    ("0000" + num).slice(-4) will work everywhere, AFAIK – Rast Dec 30 '14 at 9:49
  • 7
    If you're already using lodash: lodash.com/docs#padLeft – mpen Jul 13 '15 at 22:44
  • 10
    ('000' + num).slice(-4) is enough ;) – Martin Schneider Apr 13 '17 at 10:27
  • 15
    ES2017: String(n).padStart(4, '0') – bpceee Mar 14 '18 at 9:06
565

Not a lot of "slick" going on so far:

function pad(n, width, z) {
  z = z || '0';
  n = n + '';
  return n.length >= width ? n : new Array(width - n.length + 1).join(z) + n;
}

When you initialize an array with a number, it creates an array with the length set to that value so that the array appears to contain that many undefined elements. Though some Array instance methods skip array elements without values, .join() doesn't, or at least not completely; it treats them as if their value is the empty string. Thus you get a copy of the zero character (or whatever "z" is) between each of the array elements; that's why there's a + 1 in there.

Example usage:

pad(10, 4);      // 0010
pad(9, 4);       // 0009
pad(123, 4);     // 0123

pad(10, 4, '-'); // --10
  • 2
    "When you initialize an array with a number, it creates an array with that many undefined elements. " - I don't think that's correct. It just sets the length property and join iterates length times. Access of an undefined property always returns undefined. See "5" in Array(5) vs "0" in [1] – Benjamin Gruenbaum Jul 24 '14 at 11:56
  • 4
    @Pointy allocating space is implementation detail that is invisible to the programmer (no implementations that are open and I'm aware of do that (Rhino, V8, SM, JSC) any implementation that allocates memory and exposes the properties is in violation of the EcmaScript specification that is very clear about this (under "The Array constructor 15.4.2.2"). It's not a big deal and the answer is otherwise nice, it would be nice if you fixed this detail. – Benjamin Gruenbaum Jul 24 '14 at 12:27
  • 8
    thanks for your answer, but variables like "n" and "z" are not intuitive as to what they are doing. – DLeh May 21 '15 at 13:27
  • 10
    do you really need an Array? function pad(n, width, z) { while(n.length<width) n = '' + z + n; return n;} – Paolo Feb 18 '16 at 23:48
  • 14
    "Slick", compact, and extensible. function pad(n, width=3, z=0) {return (String(z).repeat(width) + String(n)).slice(String(n).length)} – Gui Weinmann Jun 1 '16 at 20:55
229
function padToFour(number) {
  if (number<=9999) { number = ("000"+number).slice(-4); }
  return number;
}

Something like that?

Bonus incomprehensible-but-slicker single-line ES6 version:

let padToFour = number => number <= 9999 ? `000${number}`.slice(-4) : number;

ES6isms:

  • let is a block scoped variable (as opposed to var’s functional scoping)
  • => is an arrow function that among other things replaces function and is prepended by its parameters
  • If a arrow function takes a single parameter you can omit the parentheses (hence number =>)
  • If an arrow function body has a single line that starts with return you can omit the braces and the return keyword and simply use the expression
  • To get the function body down to a single line I cheated and used a ternary expression
  • 1
    It’s simple but not that novel; I had to do something similar recently and found that approach online. – Robin Whittleton Apr 9 '12 at 15:48
  • 4
    Only took a vote off, because this isn't a modular approach (only works with 4 digits). Of course, it is a specific answer to a specific question, but including a length option would be better (like other answers). – doubleJ Nov 4 '13 at 19:26
  • 1
    I love the usage of slice. However as @doubleJ mentioned please note that a limitation of this approach is that will truncate the number to its last 4 digits. – Jorge Orpinel Mar 23 '14 at 0:50
  • 9
    Actually @JorgeOrpinel it will not truncate. The if statement causes the slice operation to only operate on numbers with four or fewer digits. A five-digit number has a value of at least 10000, which is not <= 9999. – Luke Griffiths Jun 26 '14 at 16:50
  • 1
    This was a while back, but as far as I remember I’d found it a good 6-12 months earlier and it had lodged in my head. If I had a link I’d definitely have added it. – Robin Whittleton May 19 '16 at 10:46
131

Try:

String.prototype.lpad = function(padString, length) {
    var str = this;
    while (str.length < length)
        str = padString + str;
    return str;
}

Now test:

var str = "5";
alert(str.lpad("0", 4)); //result "0005"
var str = "10"; // note this is string type
alert(str.lpad("0", 4)); //result "0010"

DEMO


In ECMAScript 8 , we have new method padStart and padEnd which has below syntax.

'string'.padStart(targetLength [,padString]):

So now we can use

const str = "5";
str.padStart(4, '0'); // '0005'
  • 1
    For completeness' sake, you should take the last length chars from the final string, to handle the case where padString is more than one symbol. – DCoder Apr 9 '12 at 13:20
  • @DCoder : pardon, but what exactly you want to say, I didn't get you really. – diEcho Apr 9 '12 at 13:31
  • 5
    The way you're doing it, "5".lpad("--", 4) will produce "----5" instead of "---5". – DCoder Apr 9 '12 at 13:34
  • 6
    Extending String prototype as any other built-in is not recommended. – user212328 Dec 13 '14 at 22:52
  • 4
    +1 for pointing out the ES8 solution. There's a simple polyfill described here: 2ality.com/2015/11/string-padding.html – Marco Luglio Jan 29 '18 at 14:18
60

Funny, I recently had to do this.

function padDigits(number, digits) {
    return Array(Math.max(digits - String(number).length + 1, 0)).join(0) + number;
}

Use like:

padDigits(9, 4);  // "0009"
padDigits(10, 4); // "0010"
padDigits(15000, 4); // "15000"

Not beautiful, but effective.

  • @doubleJ Pointy's and mine are actually very similar, if not identical, except his has the feature of being able to pad with something other than 0. You could use his like pad(15, 3) much in the same way mine is used. – Peter C Nov 6 '13 at 22:02
  • I wrote a similar answer, I first turn the num to str and use return (Array(Math.max(5-str.length, 0)).join("0") + str);, just droping this in case the other Q gets deleted – ajax333221 Jan 17 '14 at 19:57
  • 1
    To handle negative numbers, use the absolute value of the number then tack on a negative sign ('-') to the end result. (number < 0 ? '-' : '') + Array(Math.max(digits - String(value).length + 1, 0)).join(0) + value where 'value' is Math.abs(number). – Neil Monroe Feb 20 '15 at 22:26
23

You did say you had a number-

String.prototype.padZero= function(len, c){
    var s= '', c= c || '0', len= (len || 2)-this.length;
    while(s.length<len) s+= c;
    return s+this;
}
Number.prototype.padZero= function(len, c){
    return String(this).padZero(len,c);
}
  • 2
    Love to know why this is not getting up-voted. Seems the most logical and complete solution. Example usage var v=2; v.padZero(4); v.padZero(4,'+'); produces '0002' '+++2' – rob Dec 15 '13 at 22:17
  • 1
    I've been looking to pad with leading zeros and this is my chosen solution. Should be more upvotes. – Mikebert4 Oct 16 '15 at 11:32
  • 2
    because this is too specific a solution... ``` String.prototype.lpad = function(len, c){ var s= '', c= c || ' ', len= (len || 2)-this.length; while(s.length<len) s+= c; return s+this; } Number.prototype.lpad = function(len, c){ return String(this).lpad(len, c); } Number.prototype.lpadZero = function(len) { return this.lpad(len,'0'); } ``` is a clearer solution to this as it's predictable; and produces a less effect-driven result if pad was used in error, it simply adds spaces which do not affect readability or accessibility – MrMesees Nov 7 '15 at 10:25
  • Also just realized four spaces for markdown is not working in these comment fields – MrMesees Nov 7 '15 at 10:28
12

You could do something like this:

function pad ( num, size ) {
  return ( Math.pow( 10, size ) + ~~num ).toString().substring( 1 );
}

Edit: This was just a basic idea for a function, but to add support for larger numbers (as well as invalid input), this would probably be better:

function pad ( num, size ) {
  if (num.toString().length >= size) return num;
  return ( Math.pow( 10, size ) + Math.floor(num) ).toString().substring( 1 );
}

This does 2 things:

  1. If the number is larger than the specified size, it will simply return the number.
  2. Using Math.floor(num) in place of ~~num will support larger numbers.
  • 1
    pad(1111111111111, 10) returns 714581447 – Serkan Yersen Mar 31 '14 at 21:38
  • 2
    This is due to the number being too large for the method used in my original solution (~~num). In order to support larger numbers, I added a new version of this function that uses Math.floor(). In addition to this, the number you provided was larger than the size you specified, so I added a check for this scenario. – Robert Messerle Apr 1 '14 at 23:10
  • This solution is not useful because 1) only works for small values of size, 2) cannot handle decimal places: e.g. pad(0.3333,10) = '0000000000' – Ron Wertlen Aug 13 '15 at 13:23
3

For fun, instead of using a loop to create the extra zeros:

function zeroPad(n,length){
  var s=n+"",needed=length-s.length;
  if (needed>0) s=(Math.pow(10,needed)+"").slice(1)+s;
  return s;
}
  • How about new Array(needed + 1).join('0') instead of that expensive exponentiation? :-) – Pointy Apr 9 '12 at 13:20
  • 2
    Note that this will only work for lengths below a certain size, before the numbers switch over to scientific notation. Pointy's Array usage is more effective in general. (@Pointy: because this is just for fun :) – Phrogz Apr 9 '12 at 13:21
  • 1
    Yes I know. That's like the only legit use of the Array constructor so it deserves an airing :-) – Pointy Apr 9 '12 at 13:23
2

This is not really 'slick' but it's faster to do integer operations than to do string concatenations for each padding 0.

function ZeroPadNumber ( nValue )
{
    if ( nValue < 10 )
    {
        return ( '000' + nValue.toString () );
    }
    else if ( nValue < 100 )
    {
        return ( '00' + nValue.toString () );
    }
    else if ( nValue < 1000 )
    {
        return ( '0' + nValue.toString () );
    }
    else
    {
        return ( nValue );
    }
}

This function is also hardcoded to your particular need (4 digit padding), so it's not generic.

  • 1
    is this slick yet? ((x < 10) ? '000' : (x < 100) ? '00' : (x < 1000) ? '0' : '')+(+x) – AlexChaffee Mar 20 '18 at 18:21
  • @AlexChaffee Probably. :) – xxbbcc Mar 20 '18 at 19:55
  • @Hafthor Did you post that as a serious suggestion or just a joke? – xxbbcc Jan 29 at 16:28
2

Since you mentioned it's always going to have a length of 4, I won't be doing any error checking to make this slick. ;)

function pad(input) {
    var BASE = "0000";
    return input ? BASE.substr(0, 4 - Math.ceil(input / 10)) + input : BASE;
}

Idea: Simply replace '0000' with number provided... Issue with that is, if input is 0, I need to hard-code it to return '0000'. LOL.

This should be slick enough.

JSFiddler: http://jsfiddle.net/Up5Cr/

  • Here is some random output that proves this is not as slick as you thought it was... bundle.js:81 023 bundle.js:81 024 bundle.js:81 025 bundle.js:81 026 bundle.js:81 027 bundle.js:81 028 bundle.js:81 029 bundle.js:81 030 ... bundle.js:81 80 – Rheijn May 25 '18 at 7:13
  • not perfect, but I like the idea. Somebody's thinking outside the box :) ... Perhaps replace the 4-Math.ceil(...) part with 4-`${input}`.length() – bvdb Jan 20 at 23:09

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