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I am using sessions in PHP to track if a user is logged in. I do not use it to store any other data about the user; essentially it is like checking a hash table to see if the user has authenticated.

Would there be some advantage to using redis instead of native PHP sessions?

I'm curious about performance, scalability, and security (not really concerned with code complexity).

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    I don't really think you need to worry much about sessions unless you get MASSIVE ammounts of traffic, PHP handle sessions nicely, and if you store only that little data, it should be fine even with a lot of requests, and about performance it should be close, as redis is not native to PHP. – gosukiwi Apr 9 '12 at 16:42
  • @gosukiwi thanks! what do you mean by massive? like 10k users at once, or like 1mil? i understand it depends on my machine, but im trying to see if php might have some upper limit (like if it were to store each session as an individual file, making it subject to the OSs filesystem performance). – tau Apr 9 '12 at 16:53
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    Well I would worry about the memory usage of the server in that case, as it's all stored in RAM, with 10k users, if each user uses like 1kb data of sessions, it would consume 10,000kb or 10~mb, which is not much, PHP is smart enough to use a good enough data structure to hold and quickly write and read those values, the problem is if the session data is too big, or for some reason the server consumes too many resources reading the session data, but that's normally if it's the data is too big. – gosukiwi Apr 9 '12 at 16:58
  • @gosukiwi that was the answer i was looking for; thanks! – tau Apr 9 '12 at 17:08
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    Just for the record, both gosu kiwi and Sripathi Krishnan are wrong here. PHP stores sessions by default on temporary files, which means redis will always perform better (as it's primarily memory based). But that being said, it is true you may not gain a significant improvement by switching to redis if you didn't have a bottleneck there in the first place. – Mahn Jun 10 '12 at 17:57
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You want the session save handler to be fast. This is due to the fact that a PHP session will block all other concurrent requests from the same user until the first request is finished.

There are a variety of handlers you could use for PHP sessions across multiple servers: File w/ NFS, MySQL Database, Memcache, and Redis.

The database method (using InnoDB) was the slowest in my experience followed by File w/ NFS. Locking and write contention are the main factors. Memcache and Redis provide similar performance and are by far the better alternatives since all operations are in RAM. Redis is my choice because you can enable disk persistence, and Memcache is only memory based.

I explain Redis Sessions in PHP with Kohana if you want more detail. Here is our dashboard for managing Redis keys:

Redis Dashboard

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Using something like Redis for storing sessions is a great way to get more performance out of load balanced servers.

For example on Amazon Web Services, the load balancers have what's called 'sticky sessions'. What this means is that when a user first connects to your web app, e.g. when logging in to it, the load balancer will choose one of your app servers and this user will continue to be served from this server until they exit your application. This is because the sessions used by PHP, for example, will be stored on the app server that they first start using.

Now, if you use Redis on a separate server, then configure your PHP on each of your app servers to store it's sessions in Redis, you can turn this 'sticky sessions' off. This would mean that any of your servers can access the sessions and, therefore, the user be served from a different server with every request to your app. This ultimately makes for more efficient use of your load balancing set-up.

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I don't really think you need to worry much about sessions unless you get MASSIVE ammounts of traffic, PHP handle sessions nicely, and if you store only that little data, it should be fine even with a lot of requests, and about performance it should be close, as redis is not native to PHP.

With 10k users, if each user uses like 1kb data of sessions, it would consume 10,000kb or 10~mb, which is not much; PHP is smart enough to use a good enough data structure to hold and quickly write and read those values. The problem is if the session data is too big, or for some reason the server consumes too many resources reading the session data, but that's normally if it's the data is too big.

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