70

I am just starting to learn Ruby (first time programming), and have a basic syntactical question with regards to variables, and various ways of writing code.

Chris Pine's "Learn to Program" taught me to write a basic program like this...

num_cars_again= 2
puts 'I own ' + num_cars_again.to_s + ' cars.'

This is fine, but then I stumbled across the tutorial on ruby.learncodethehardway.com, and was taught to write the same exact program like this...

num_cars= 2
puts "I own #{num_cars} cars."

They both output the same thing, but obviously option 2 is a much shorter way to do it.

Is there any particular reason why I should use one format over the other?

  • 4
    Ugh. I hate how often beginners books teach you an un-natural way of doing things without at least telling you that alternatives exist. +1 for a legitimate question that hasn't been upvoted. – Andrew Grimm Apr 9 '12 at 23:47
  • There are more options that are discussed at stackoverflow.com/questions/377768/… – sameers Jun 26 '13 at 21:00
67

Whenever TIMTOWTDI (there is more than one way to do it), you should look for the pros and cons. Using "string interpolation" (the second) instead of "string concatenation" (the first):

Pros:

  • Is less typing
  • Automatically calls to_s for you
  • More idiomatic within the Ruby community
  • Faster to accomplish during runtime

Cons:

  • Automatically calls to_s for you (maybe you thought you had a string, and the to_s representation is not what you wanted, and hides the fact that it wasn't a string)
  • Requires you to use " to delimit your string instead of ' (perhaps you have a habit of using ', or you previously typed a string using that and only later needed to use string interpolation)
  • 22
    Don't forget the "it's faster" aspect. String concatenation, in this example, has to create 3 strings in total, while string interpolation only creates one. – Dominik Honnef Apr 9 '12 at 16:51
  • 4
    if you care about benchmarks it's also faster: try me in REPL – mrlee Apr 9 '12 at 16:51
  • 2
    Thanks so much for the answers. Quick question. Why would Chris Pine's book teach the longer way to do it? Maybe it is better for a beginner to learn doing it the longer way? His book says most the time lazier=better, so I'm wondering if maybe for some reason (since I'm just learning), I should continue doing it his way or move forward with this better way. Any ideas? – Jeff H. Apr 9 '12 at 16:52
  • 5
    My guess: because "attaching strings together using a well-known operator" is a simpler concept for a new programmer than "use a custom syntax to evaluate arbitrary code, call to_s on the result, and inject it into the middle of a string". When learning any new thing there are often variations on "the simple-to-understand way" versus "the way the professionals do it". – Phrogz Apr 9 '12 at 16:54
  • 7
    I know I'm super-late to this discussion, but there are two main reasons why I did it the way that I did. First, for the reasons Phrogz gives: I was trying to keep it as simple as possible, using concepts they already knew. I didn't even cover double-quoted strings in the first edition! The last thing someone wants when learning to program is six different syntaxes for creating strings. Second, because of the implicit to_s. Yes, for those of us who understand types and conversions, it's a convenience. But for a new programmer, it's really important to understand those concepts. – Chris Pine Sep 9 '14 at 3:30
8

Both interpolation and concatination has its own strength and weakness. Below I gave a benchmark which clearly demonstrates where to use concatination and where to use interpolation.

require 'benchmark'

iterations = 1_00_000
firstname = 'soundarapandian'
middlename = 'rathinasamy'
lastname = 'arumugam'

puts 'With dynamic new strings'
puts '===================================================='
5.times do
  Benchmark.bm(10) do |benchmark|
    benchmark.report('concatination') do
      iterations.times do
        'Mr. ' + firstname + middlename + lastname + ' aka soundar'
      end
    end

    benchmark.report('interpolaton') do
      iterations.times do
        "Mr. #{firstname} #{middlename} #{lastname} aka soundar"
      end
    end
  end
  puts '--------------------------------------------------'
end

puts 'With predefined strings'
puts '===================================================='
5.times do
  Benchmark.bm(10) do |benchmark|
    benchmark.report('concatination') do
      iterations.times do
        firstname + middlename + lastname
      end
    end

    benchmark.report('interpolaton') do
      iterations.times do
        "#{firstname} #{middlename} #{lastname}"
      end
    end
  end
  puts '--------------------------------------------------'
end

And below is the Benchmark result

Without predefined strings
====================================================
                 user     system      total        real
concatination  0.170000   0.000000   0.170000 (  0.165821)
interpolaton  0.130000   0.010000   0.140000 (  0.133665)
--------------------------------------------------
                 user     system      total        real
concatination  0.180000   0.000000   0.180000 (  0.180410)
interpolaton  0.120000   0.000000   0.120000 (  0.125051)
--------------------------------------------------
                 user     system      total        real
concatination  0.140000   0.000000   0.140000 (  0.134256)
interpolaton  0.110000   0.000000   0.110000 (  0.111427)
--------------------------------------------------
                 user     system      total        real
concatination  0.130000   0.000000   0.130000 (  0.132047)
interpolaton  0.120000   0.000000   0.120000 (  0.120443)
--------------------------------------------------
                 user     system      total        real
concatination  0.170000   0.000000   0.170000 (  0.170394)
interpolaton  0.150000   0.000000   0.150000 (  0.149601)
--------------------------------------------------
With predefined strings
====================================================
                 user     system      total        real
concatination  0.070000   0.000000   0.070000 (  0.067735)
interpolaton  0.100000   0.000000   0.100000 (  0.099335)
--------------------------------------------------
                 user     system      total        real
concatination  0.060000   0.000000   0.060000 (  0.061955)
interpolaton  0.130000   0.000000   0.130000 (  0.127011)
--------------------------------------------------
                 user     system      total        real
concatination  0.090000   0.000000   0.090000 (  0.092136)
interpolaton  0.110000   0.000000   0.110000 (  0.110224)
--------------------------------------------------
                 user     system      total        real
concatination  0.080000   0.000000   0.080000 (  0.077587)
interpolaton  0.110000   0.000000   0.110000 (  0.112975)
--------------------------------------------------
                 user     system      total        real
concatination  0.090000   0.000000   0.090000 (  0.088154)
interpolaton  0.140000   0.000000   0.140000 (  0.135349)
--------------------------------------------------

Conclusion

If strings already defined and sure they will never be nil use concatination else use interpolation.Use appropriate one which will result in better performance than one which is easy to indent.

  • which Ruby version did you use? – La-comadreja Dec 9 '14 at 21:13
  • 1
    I tried it in ruby 2.5.0 and the interpolation is faster than concatenation in both cases. I couldn't paste results here because of comment's length limit but you can try it yourself. – Peter T. Mar 12 '18 at 9:23
4

@user1181898 - IMHO, it's because it's easier to see what's happening. To @Phrogz's point, string interpolation automatically calls the to_s for you. As a beginner, you need to see what's happening "under the hood" so that you learn the concept as opposed to just learning by rote.

Think of it like learning mathematics. You learn the "long" way in order to understand the concepts so that you can take shortcuts once you actually know what you are doing. I speak from experience b/c I'm not that advanced in Ruby yet, but I've made enough mistakes to advise people on what not to do. Hope this helps.

  • Thanks alot, it does! – Jeff H. Apr 9 '12 at 17:13
2

If you are using a string as a buffer, I found that using concatenation (String#concat) to be faster.

require 'benchmark/ips'

puts "Ruby #{RUBY_VERSION} at #{Time.now}"
puts

firstname = 'soundarapandian'
middlename = 'rathinasamy'
lastname = 'arumugam'

Benchmark.ips do |x|
    x.report("String\#<<") do |i|
        buffer = String.new

        while (i -= 1) > 0
            buffer << 'Mr. ' << firstname << middlename << lastname << ' aka soundar'
        end
    end

    x.report("String interpolate") do |i|
        buffer = String.new

        while (i -= 1) > 0
            buffer << "Mr. #{firstname} #{middlename} #{lastname} aka soundar"
        end
    end

    x.compare!
end

Results:

Ruby 2.3.1 at 2016-11-15 15:03:57 +1300

Warming up --------------------------------------
           String#<<   230.615k i/100ms
  String interpolate   234.274k i/100ms
Calculating -------------------------------------
           String#<<      2.345M (± 7.2%) i/s -     11.761M in   5.041164s
  String interpolate      1.242M (± 5.4%) i/s -      6.325M in   5.108324s

Comparison:
           String#<<:  2344530.4 i/s
  String interpolate:  1241784.9 i/s - 1.89x  slower

At a guess, I'd say that interpolation generates a temporary string which is why it's slower.

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