133

In python, How do I do something like:

for car in cars:
   # Skip first and last, do work for rest
  • 2
    i'm a newbie, but i have been using for n, i in enumerate(cars): if n!= 0: do something to i. the logic is that it adds a 'counter' to each value which you can then target eg with if n == some_value. in this example it would do something to each instance of i, except for the first one. – user1063287 May 7 '13 at 7:24

12 Answers 12

194

The other answers only work for a sequence.

For any iterable, to skip the first item:

itercars = iter(cars)
next(itercars)
for car in itercars:
    # do work

If you want to skip the last, you could do:

itercars = iter(cars)
# add 'next(itercars)' here if you also want to skip the first
prev = next(itercars)
for car in itercars:
    # do work on 'prev' not 'car'
    # at end of loop:
    prev = car
# now you can do whatever you want to do to the last one on 'prev'
  • 1
    Also see Sven Marnach's answer – agf Jun 5 '13 at 20:06
  • I found that doing cars.pop(0) and cars.pop() works well. – dreamwork801 Oct 23 '18 at 13:37
  • @dreamwork801 My answer and Sven's, which I link in the first comment, work for any iterable, even infinite ones, as they don't require an O(n) operation on the data before iteration begins. Your suggestion, and Abhjit's, both only work for sequences, not any iterable. – agf Oct 23 '18 at 18:17
277

To skip the first element in Python you can simply write

for car in cars[1:]:
    # Do What Ever you want

or to skip the last elem

for car in cars[:-1]:
    # Do What Ever you want

You can use this concept for any sequence.

23

Here is a more general generator function that skips any number of items from the beginning and end of an iterable:

def skip(iterable, at_start=0, at_end=0):
    it = iter(iterable)
    for x in itertools.islice(it, at_start):
        pass
    queue = collections.deque(itertools.islice(it, at_end))
    for x in it:
        queue.append(x)
        yield queue.popleft()

Example usage:

>>> list(skip(range(10), at_start=2, at_end=2))
[2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]
  • Might want to add a fast path for at_end == 0. – agf Apr 9 '12 at 21:46
  • collections.deque(...) will immediately go through the iterator. This means skip(xrange(10000000), 1) will take up a lot of memory even though it really shouldn't. – Roee Shenberg Dec 4 '12 at 11:06
  • 3
    @RoeeShenberg: skip(xrange(10000000), 1) will use at_end=0, so the parameter to deque() will be islice(it, 0), which will only consume zero elements of it. This won't take up a lot of memory. – Sven Marnach Dec 11 '12 at 23:32
16

The best way to skip the first item(s) is:

from itertools import islice
for car in islice(cars, 1, None):
    # do something

islice in this case is invoked with a start-point of 1, and an end point of None, signifying the end of the iterator.

To be able to skip items from the end of an iterable, you need to know its length (always possible for a list, but not necessarily for everything you can iterate on). for example, islice(cars, 1, len(cars)-1) will skip the first and last items in the cars list.

  • Take a look at Sven's (underappreciated) answer. He covers skipping an arbitrary number of items at the beginning and / or end of any iterable using islice quite well, without knowing the length or storing more items in memory at once than absolutely necessary. – agf Oct 17 '12 at 2:12
  • Sven's answer will actually store the entire iterator in memory - collections.deque will run through the iterator. Try doing something like collections.deque(xrange(10000000)). There's no need to store all the ints in memory if you want to skip the first item... – Roee Shenberg Dec 4 '12 at 11:04
  • 2
    An islice is what is passed to the deque, not the whole iterator, and it is only the length of the number of items to skip at the end. It doesn't store the whole iterator in memory. – agf Dec 4 '12 at 14:16
  • you're right - I was lazy with reading the code – Roee Shenberg Dec 20 '12 at 15:48
6
for item in do_not_use_list_as_a_name[1:-1]:
    #...do whatever
  • 3
    Don't use list as a variable name – Abhijit Apr 9 '12 at 20:17
  • you are right, it's a reserved name. – KurzedMetal Apr 9 '12 at 20:18
  • the OP only wants to skip the first element. why :-1 ? – luke14free Apr 9 '12 at 20:23
  • 5
    It's not actually reserved; the name list can be re-bound. That's why you shouldn't, rather than can't, use it. – Josh Caswell Apr 9 '12 at 20:24
  • @luke14free, the question says skip first element, but his code comment implies that he really wants to skip first and last. – JerseyMike Apr 9 '12 at 20:27
3

Based on @SvenMarnach 's Answer, but bit simpler and without using deque

>>> def skip(iterable, at_start=0, at_end=0):
    it = iter(iterable)
    it = itertools.islice(it, at_start, None)
    it, it1 = itertools.tee(it)
    it1 = itertools.islice(it1, at_end, None)
    return (next(it) for _ in it1)

>>> list(skip(range(10), at_start=2, at_end=2))
[2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]
>>> list(skip(range(10), at_start=2, at_end=5))
[2, 3, 4]

Also Note, based on my timeit result, this is marginally faster than the deque solution

>>> iterable=xrange(1000)
>>> stmt1="""
def skip(iterable, at_start=0, at_end=0):
    it = iter(iterable)
    it = itertools.islice(it, at_start, None)
    it, it1 = itertools.tee(it)
    it1 = itertools.islice(it1, at_end, None)
    return (next(it) for _ in it1)
list(skip(iterable,2,2))
    """
>>> stmt2="""
def skip(iterable, at_start=0, at_end=0):
    it = iter(iterable)
    for x in itertools.islice(it, at_start):
        pass
    queue = collections.deque(itertools.islice(it, at_end))
    for x in it:
        queue.append(x)
        yield queue.popleft()
list(skip(iterable,2,2))
        """
>>> timeit.timeit(stmt = stmt1, setup='from __main__ import iterable, skip, itertools', number = 10000)
2.0313770640908047
>>> timeit.timeit(stmt = stmt2, setup='from __main__ import iterable, skip, itertools, collections', number = 10000)
2.9903135454296716
  • By using tee(), you're still creating an entire list in memory for the generator, right? (your it1) – Jabberwockey Mar 3 '15 at 23:13
3

To skip the first item on a list, you can use:

for l in lines[1:]:
    print(l)

or next ():

for l in lines:
    next()
    print(l)
  • Not sure what you were trying to do with next() but it needs a parameter and you don't have any here. You'd have to call iter then next as in agf's answer. – Jacque Goupil Sep 21 '18 at 15:17
  • Please read the next documentation, the argument is optional docs.python.org/2/library/functions.html#next – Pedro Lobito Sep 23 '18 at 10:09
  • The default parameter is, not the iterator. What are you talking about?? – Jacque Goupil Sep 23 '18 at 17:44
2

Well, your syntax isn't really Python to begin with.

Iterations in Python are over he contents of containers (well, technically it's over iterators), with a syntax for item in container. In this case, the container is the cars list, but you want to skip the first and last elements, so that means cars[1:-1] (python lists are zero-based, negative numbers count from the end, and : is slicing syntax.

So you want

for c in cars[1:-1]:
    do something with c
  • 3
    This won't work with an iterable (e.g. a generator), only with a sequence. – Roee Shenberg Dec 4 '12 at 11:07
2

An alternative method:

for idx, car in enumerate(cars):
    # Skip first line.
    if not idx:
        continue
    # Skip last line.
    if idx + 1 == len(cars):
        continue
    # Real code here.
    print car
1

If cars is a sequence you can just do

for car in cars[1:-1]:
    pass
0

The more_itertools project extends itertools.islice to handle negative indices.

Example

import more_itertools as mit

iterable = 'ABCDEFGH'
list(mit.islice_extended(iterable, 1, -1))
# Out: ['B', 'C', 'D', 'E', 'F', 'G']

Therefore, you can elegantly apply it slice elements between the first and last items of an iterable:

for car in mit.islice_extended(cars, 1, -1):
    # do something
0

I do it like this, even though it looks like a hack it works every time:

ls_of_things = ['apple', 'car', 'truck', 'bike', 'banana']
first = 0
last = len(ls_of_things)
for items in ls_of_things:
    if first == 0
        first = first + 1
        pass
    elif first == last - 1:
        break
    else:
        do_stuff
        first = first + 1
        pass

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