9

I've got some longitude\latitude coordinates bunched together in a string that I'd like to split into longitude\latitude pairs. Thanks to stackoverflow I've been able to come up with the some linq that will split it into a multidimensional string array. Is there a way to split the string directly into an object that accepts the longitude latitude vs a string array then create the object?

string segment = "51.54398, -0.27585;51.55175, -0.29631;51.56233, -0.30369;51.57035, -0.30856;51.58157, -0.31672;51.59233, -0.3354"

string[][] array = segment.Split(';').Select(s => s.Split(',')).ToArray();
foreach (string[] pair in array)
{
//create object here
}
  • 1
    There is (almost?) never a good way to split a string using linq. That said, System.Text.RegularExpressions is what you want – sehe Apr 9 '12 at 21:52
  • 1
    What's that -0.3354", "London:484" at the end of your string? – Tim Schmelter Apr 9 '12 at 21:54
  • 2
    @sehe: Using a regular expression for such a trivial task is overkill. If you know that the format of your input is constant and that it is easy to parse by splitting you should be using split instead of a regex. – Ed S. Apr 9 '12 at 21:55
  • @TimSchmelter Sorry, some extra data in there. – NullReference Apr 9 '12 at 22:00
  • @sehe Not a big fan of RegualrExpressions but I appreciate the answer. – NullReference Apr 9 '12 at 22:01
24

You are close. Something like this might help:

var pairSequence = segment.Split(';')
        .Select(s => s.Split(','))
        .Select(a => new { Lat = double.Parse(a[0]), Long = double.Parse(a[1]) });
  • @Alex Of course, depends on the type you actually need. You get the idea. – mmx Apr 9 '12 at 21:56
  • Damn. Was in the process of writing almost something identical. Kudos. – Robert P Apr 9 '12 at 21:57
6

Assuming you have a Coordinate class with a public Coordinate(double x, double y) constructor, you can do this:

Coordinate[] result = segment
    .Split(';')
    .Select(s => s.Split(','))
    .Select(a => new Coordinate(x: double.Parse(a[0], NumberStyles.Number),
                                y: double.Parse(a[1], NumberStyles.Number))
    .ToArray();

or equally

var query = from item in segment.Split(';')
            let parts = item.Split(',')
            let x = double.Parse(parts[0], NumberStyles.Number)
            let y = double.Parse(parts[1], NumberStyles.Number)
            select new Coordinate(x, y);

Coordinate[] result = query.ToArray();
3

You could do this:

public class GeoCoordinates {
  public decimal Latitude { get; set; }
  public decimal Longitude { get; set; }

  public GeoCoordinates( string latLongPair ) {
    decimal lat, lng;
    var parts = latLongPair.Split( new[] { ',' } );
    if( decimal.TryParse( parts[0], out lat ) &&
      decimal.TryParse( parts[1], out lng ) ) {
      Latitude = lat;
      Longitude = lng;
    } else {
      // you could set some kind of "ParseFailed" or "Invalid" property here
    }
  }
}

Then you can create a collection of GeoCoordinate classes thusly:

var coords = segment.Split( new[] {';'} ).Select( x => new GeoCoordinates( x ) );
  • Heh...StackOverflow can be quite the race, can't it? – Ethan Brown Apr 9 '12 at 22:07
3

Here is a ‘somewhat’ nice snippet showing:

  • precompiled regexen
  • LINQ to anonymous type projection
  • Culture-aware (correct) number parsing and printing

You would want to extract certain code (e.g. the number parsing) in real life.

See it live on Ideone.com.

using System;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;
using System.Globalization;

namespace SODemo
{
    class MainClass
    {
        private static readonly CultureInfo CInfo = CultureInfo.CreateSpecificCulture("en-US");

        public static void Main (string[] args)
        {
            string segment = "51.54398, -0.27585;51.55175, -0.29631;51.56233, -0.30369;51.57035, -0.30856;51.58157, -0.31672;51.59233, -0.3354";

            var re = new Regex(@"\s*(?<lat>[-+]?[0-9.]+),\s*(?<lon>[-+]?[0-9.]+)\s*;", RegexOptions.Compiled | RegexOptions.CultureInvariant | RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);

            var locations = re.Matches(segment).Cast<Match>().Select(m => new 
            {
                Lat  = decimal.Parse(m.Groups["lat"].Value, CInfo),
                Long = decimal.Parse(m.Groups["lon"].Value, CInfo),
            });

            foreach (var l in locations)
                Console.WriteLine(l);
        }
    }
}

Output:

{ Lat = 51,54398, Long = -0,27585 }
{ Lat = 51,55175, Long = -0,29631 }
{ Lat = 51,56233, Long = -0,30369 }
{ Lat = 51,57035, Long = -0,30856 }
{ Lat = 51,58157, Long = -0,31672 }
2

Is it a necessity that you use LINQ? You can do it all with standard string splitting functionality:

string[] pairsOfCoords = segment.Split(';');
List<CoordsObject> listOfCoords = new List<CoordsObject>();
foreach (string str in pairsOfCoords)
{
  string[] coords = str.Split(',');
  CoordsObject obj = new CoordsObject(coords[0], coords[1]);
  listOfCoords.Add(obj);
}
  • 1
    Yeah, but look how much cleaner it is with linq. :) – Robert P Apr 9 '12 at 21:56
  • 1
    @RobertP: Well I suppose that is subjective. This looks pretty simple and clean to me. – Ed S. Apr 9 '12 at 21:57
1

I might add a bit more. Thanks to dtb for the start, upvoted. If you break your parsing function out, you can more cleanly handle error conditions, such as wrong number of elements in your array, or things that don't parse to a decimal.

Coordinate[] result = segment
.Split(';')
.Select(s => s.Split(','))
.Select(BuildCoordinate)
.ToArray();

Coordrinate BuildCoordinate(string[] coords)
{
    if(coords.Length != 2)
        return null;

    return new Coordinate(double.Parse(a[0].Trim(), double.Parse(a[1]);
}
1

Some tasks are just easier to solve the old way:

var split = segment.Split();
var coordinates = new List<Coordinate>(split.Length);
foreach(string s in split)
{
    coordinates.Add(new Coordinate(s));
}

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