4

First of all, forgive me, as my question may seem foolish, but I'm really curious why I get a performance boost in this very simple code.

here's the assembly code:

__asm {
    mov eax, 0
    mov ecx, 0
    jmp startloop
    notequal:
    inc eax
    mov ecx, eax
    sub ecx, 2
    startloop:
    cmp eax, 2000000000
    jne notequal
};

and this is C code:

long x = 0;
long ii = 0;
for(; ii < 2000000000; ++ii)
{
    x = ii - 2;
};

C code takes approximately 1060 ms (in release build) to complete on my i5 2500k machine and the assembly finishes in 780ms. It's a ~25% gain in speed. I don't understand why do I get this result, because 25% is a big difference. Isn't the compiler smart enough to generate an equal assembly code that I've written?

BTW I'm using MSVC 2010.

Thanks


Here's the (asm) code that's being generated by MSVC

$LL3@main:
; Line 36
    lea esi, DWORD PTR [eax-2]
    inc eax
    cmp eax, 2000000000             ; 77359400H
    jl  SHORT $LL3@main

what does lea instruction do in this case?

UPDATE 2


Thank you very much everyone. I just tested this code at work, on Nehalem xeon cpu and the results are identical here. Looks like for an unknown reason, that asm code runs faster on Sandy bridge.

13
  • 7
    ...and what compiler options did you use? Any optimisation options, or is the compiler generating the dumbest code it possibly can? Also, ask the compiler to generate its own assembly output and compare them. – Greg Hewgill Apr 9 '12 at 23:06
  • 3
    The best optimization: ii = 2000000000, x = 1999999997. If you need help with optimizations, code with "taboo" optimization isn't realistic. – Dani Apr 9 '12 at 23:10
  • I used standard optimisation options, /O2 and /Ot – Davita Apr 9 '12 at 23:10
  • 1
    @Davita: its still not a real example. there is the best optimization that I'm sure one optimizer on earth will find. if you need help optimizing something this case won't help... – Dani Apr 9 '12 at 23:14
  • 1
    My guess is that it's probably a hiccup in the Sandy Bridge processor's pipeline. The compiler generated code is indeed a lot shorter with fewer instructions. – Mysticial Apr 9 '12 at 23:25
2

@modelnine's comment is correct - the lea is being used to simplify the assignment in your loop. You have:

x = ii - 2;

And the lea (load effective address) instruction is doing effectively:

esi = &(*(eax - 2));

The & and * cancel each other out (and that's important - dereferencing eax in this case will probably cause problems), so you get:

esi = eax - 2;

Exactly what your C code was trying to do.

7
  • The only trouble is, the compiler generated version (with the lea) is slower. I've confirmed this myself. – Mysticial Apr 9 '12 at 23:28
  • Then you have to write it yourself or complain to the compiler-writers, I suppose. I changed my answer to 'simplify' rather than 'speed up'. – Carl Norum Apr 9 '12 at 23:29
  • 5
    I think it's a hardware thing. On Nehalem, there is no difference. On Sandy Bridge, there's 25% difference. So it's probably a pipeline issue. Nothing to do with the compiler. – Mysticial Apr 9 '12 at 23:30
  • 1
    Well, the compiler doesn't know what the code will run on. Even if it "knew" it would be slower on Sandy Bridge, but faster on another architecture, which would it pick? – Mysticial Apr 9 '12 at 23:32
  • 2
    @CarlNorum This is not a bug in gcc. The compiler does indeed generate better code, and the code should run as fast or faster than the simple loop written by the OP. It' rather a "bug" in the SB hardware - and the OP managed to find a rare instance of it. – Gunther Piez Apr 10 '12 at 8:18
2

I compared the non-asm version:

#include <iostream>
#include <chrono>

int main() {
    auto start = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();

    long x = 0;
    long ii = 0;
    for(; ii < 2000000000; ++ii)
    {
        x = ii - 2;
    };

    auto finish = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    std::cout << (finish-start).count() << '\n';
    std::cout << x << ii << '\n';
}

with the asm version:

#include <iostream>
#include <chrono>

int main() {
    auto start = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();

    asm (R"(
         mov $0, %eax
         mov $0, %ecx
         jmp startloop
         notequal:
         inc %eax
         mov %eax,%ecx
         sub $2,%ecx
         startloop:
         cmp $2000000000,%eax
         jne notequal
    )");

    auto finish = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    std::cout << (finish-start).count() << '\n';
}

using clang 3.1

With optimizations turned on the asm version took about 1.4 s while the non-asm version took 45 nanoseconds. This works out to the assembly version being about 32 million percent slower.

Here's the assembly generated for the non-asm version:

movl    $1999999997, %esi       ## imm = 0x773593FD
callq   __ZNSt3__113basic_ostreamIcNS_11char_traitsIcEEElsEl
movq    %rax, %rdi
movl    $2000000000, %esi       ## imm = 0x77359400
callq   __ZNSt3__113basic_ostreamIcNS_11char_traitsIcEEElsEl
3
  • 4
    @g24l It's kind of a joke. Clang is just optimizing away the whole thing. The only reason there's any asm to show at all is because I print out x and ii. The 45 ns is essentially just the time it takes to call the timing function. – bames53 Apr 10 '12 at 0:05
  • 1
    @bames53 oops sorry mate, I meant to write, that I verified those results also, but I'm talking on the phone with my girlfriend , which takes 50% of my own cpu time... – user677656 Apr 10 '12 at 0:08
  • 2
    This answer absolutely shows why C++ can be faster than assembler- because the compiler is smarter than you. – Puppy Apr 10 '12 at 0:19
1

Why don't you try gcc -Ofast or maybe gcc -O1

and here is a teaser : gcc -Q -Ofast --help=optimizers , right from the gnu manual!

and here is a comparison:

section .text
global _start

_start:
    mov eax, 0
    mov ecx, 0
    jmp startloop
    notequal:
    inc eax
    mov ecx, eax
    sub ecx, 2
    startloop:
    cmp eax, 2000000000
    jne notequal

    int     0x80

    mov     ebx,0
    mov     eax,1
    int     0x80

for which I got 1.306ms and the C was timed it to:

real    0m0.001s
user    0m0.000s
sys     0m0.000s

using gcc -O1 timed was:

real    0m1.295s
user    0m1.262s
sys     0m0.006s

which in fact executes the code.

For MSVC one should be able to get similar results with /O2 or /O1 compilation options. Details here http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/k1ack8f1.aspx

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