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When I plot something with contourf, I see at the bottom of the plot window the current x and y values under the mouse cursor. Is there a way to see also the z value?

Here an example contourf:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as hp
plt.contourf(np.arange(16).reshape(-1,4))
2

The documentation example shows how you can insert z-value labels into your plot

Script: http://matplotlib.sourceforge.net/mpl_examples/pylab_examples/contour_demo.py

Basically, it's

plt.figure()
CS = plt.contour(X, Y, Z) 
plt.clabel(CS, inline=1, fontsize=10)
plt.title('Simplest default with labels')
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    thanks, this is useful, but I was asking for a live display of Z value under the cursor, the same as it is already there for X and Y. – Andrea Zonca Apr 11 '12 at 18:05
  • you can't, that's part of the wxWidgets interface. If you program your own UI, you could get the x/y coordinates, convert them to the x/y coordinates on the axis. Since you get the contours from plt.contour, you know their outline and can get the one that is at or around those coordinates. – j13r Apr 11 '12 at 18:22
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    @AndreaZonca Are you sure that this is the answer you still want to accept? wilywampa's very recent solution does exactly what you've asked for... – gboffi Feb 5 '17 at 17:42
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The text that shows the position of the cursor is generated by ax.format_coord. You can override the method to also display a z-value. For instance,

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np
import scipy.interpolate as si
data = np.arange(16).reshape(-1, 4)
X, Y = np.mgrid[:data.shape[0], :data.shape[1]]
cs = plt.contourf(X, Y, data)

func = si.interp2d(X, Y, data)
def fmt(x, y):
    z = np.take(func(x, y), 0)
    return 'x={x:.5f}  y={y:.5f}  z={z:.5f}'.format(x=x, y=y, z=z)


plt.gca().format_coord = fmt
plt.show()
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    It works, but it is also pretty slow for large datasets due to the interpolation (in my case wasn't usable for 100x100 grid). – levesque Mar 2 '18 at 17:07
  • Assuming your data is on a rectangular grid if you replace interp2d with RectBivariateSpline it will be very fast and capable of high order interpolation as well. – alessandro May 6 '20 at 4:18
  • The implementation was slow since the fmt() is called each time mouse moves one point. I edited the answer and put creation of the interpolation function (si.interp2d()) outside of fmt(), and now it's blazingly fast. – np8 Dec 7 '20 at 13:23
1

Just a variant of wilywampa's answer. If you already have a pre-computed grid of interpolated contour values because your data is sparse or if you have a huge data matrix, this might be suitable for you.

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

resolution = 100
Z = np.arange(resolution**2).reshape(-1, resolution)
X, Y = np.mgrid[:Z.shape[0], :Z.shape[1]]
cs = plt.contourf(X, Y, Z)

Xflat, Yflat, Zflat = X.flatten(), Y.flatten(), Z.flatten()
def fmt(x, y):
    # get closest point with known data
    dist = np.linalg.norm(np.vstack([Xflat - x, Yflat - y]), axis=0)
    idx = np.argmin(dist)
    z = Zflat[idx]
    return 'x={x:.5f}  y={y:.5f}  z={z:.5f}'.format(x=x, y=y, z=z)

plt.colorbar()
plt.gca().format_coord = fmt
plt.show()

Ex:

Example with mouse cursor

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