11

I have class like following:

class Car  
{  
public:  
    Car();  
    // Some functions and members and <b>enums</b>  
    enum Color
    {
        Red,
        Blue,
        Black
    };  
    Color getColor();
    void setColor(Color);  
private:  
    Color myColor;
}

I want to:

  1. access to Color values as Color::Red. It is really hardly to understand code when Car::Red is used, when class have a lot enums, subclasses etc.
  2. use type Color as function argument or return value
  3. use variable type Color in switch

I know 3 partial solutions:

  1. Using embedded class Color and enum in it
  2. Using embedded namespace Color and enum in it
  3. Using enum class

1 and 2 solutions solves a Color::Red accession problem, but I can't use functions like Color getColor() and void setColor(Color).

3 solution has a problem: VS2010 doen't support enum class. GCC v.4.1.2 doesn't support it too. I don't know about later versions of gcc.

Yes, I'm working on cross-platform project.
I have found this solution, but it seems ... heavy.
I hope somebody can help me here :)

  • 2
    GCC 4.6 (with -std=c++0x) supports enum class, and also allows Color::Red for regular enums. – leftaroundabout Apr 10 '12 at 14:48
  • side note, please indent code with 4 spaces instead of using pre/code tags – CharlesB Apr 10 '12 at 14:51
  • I found than VS2010 has partially support of Strongly typed enums. – Jury Apr 10 '12 at 15:06
17

In current C++ (i.e. C++11 and beyond), you can already access enum values like that:

enum Color { Red };
Color c = Color::Red;
Color d = Red;

You can go further and enforce the use of this notation:

enum class Color { Red };
Color c = Color::Red;
// Color d = Red;   <--  error now

And on a sidenote, you now define the underlying type, which was previously only possible with hacky code (FORCEDWORD or so anyone?):

enum class Color : char { Red };
  • You are right, but there is no compilers with full support C++11 features. Yes, GCC 4.6 and 4.7 supports it, but my project must be compiled for Windows too. VS2010 doesn't supports it. May be you know the some patch for it? – Jury Apr 10 '12 at 16:19
  • You can try MinGW, which is the windows port of GCC. MSVC is closed source and there are no patches. – Sebastian Mach Apr 11 '12 at 9:24
7

Name the enum inside the nested class (as example one):

class Car
{
public:
    struct Color
    {
        enum Type
        {
            Red,
            Blue,
            Black
        };
    };

    Color::Type getColor();
    void setColor(Color::Type);
};
  • 1
    You can also mention about C++11 feature enum class. – iammilind Apr 10 '12 at 14:50
  • And use getter and setter of Color in getter and setter of Car? – Jury Apr 10 '12 at 14:51
  • The Color:: part is not needed here? – Konrad Apr 10 '12 at 14:52
  • @Konrad Woops, fixed my example so now it's needed (since Color is intended to be a nested class). – Mark B Apr 10 '12 at 14:57
  • @iammilind The OP doesn't want to use enum class because it's not uniformly supported across all needed platforms. – Mark B Apr 10 '12 at 14:58
5

When I want to do something like this I tend to use a namespace and a typedef outside of th namespace (though usually I'm doing this globally rather than inside a class). Something like this:

namespace colors 
{
    enum Color 
    {
        Red,
        Blue
        ...
    }
}
typedef colors::Color Color;

This way you use the namespace to get at the actual colors, but the Color type itself is still globally accessible:

Color myFav = colors::Red;
  • VS2010 : error C2059: syntax error : 'namespace' | GCC 4.1.2 : error: expected unqualified-id before 'namespace' – Jury Apr 10 '12 at 15:00
  • @Jury Probably because you're not allowed to declare namespaces inside classes. Like I said, I usually do this globally. You can always use a nested class if you really want to keep it within a class - the principle's the same. – obmarg Apr 10 '12 at 15:26
  • The typedef isn't really necessary, and I would just put Color as the namespace name and not give the enum a name. I use the namespace method all the time since it's so elegant. Here's some more information about using enums: inphamousdevelopment.wordpress.com/2012/04/02/… – Alex Apr 17 '12 at 13:40
  • @alex The typedef isn't neccesary, but it's a lot nicer to have a typedef than it is to type colors::Color every time you want to store an enum value somewhere. As for not giving the enum a name - what if you want to use the enum type later on? I guess you're maybe implying you should just use an int, but why throw away type information (and therefore type-safety) like that? – obmarg Apr 17 '12 at 13:47
  • 1
    @alex I'd consider that very bad practice. Firstly, you're throwing type safety out the window: normally your compiler could warn you if you try to use a non-Color in place of a Color - but not if you just use an int. Secondly, it just makes things harder to understand for anyone reading the code - how is anyone meant to know at a glance that the function actually accepts values of the Color enum, rather than just any integer from 0 - 65536? Since there's no type safety, anyone could misunderstand the parameter, pass in a value that makes no sense and things would compile fine. – obmarg Apr 17 '12 at 15:32

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