56

I'm curious about this thing... see example:

switch(x)
{
    case(a):
        {
        //do stuff
        }
        break;
    case(b):
        //do stuff
        break;
}

All my life I've done it like case b, but since C# allows me to use it, and Visual Studio allows me to collapse that thing, I am curious - what is the real difference between case a (with braces) and case b?

4
  • 16
    There is no difference except that variables defined in case a are only visible in that block.
    – juergen d
    Commented Apr 10, 2012 at 19:40
  • 3
    Nothing really. It's just that sometimes you want to create and use objects that are scoped to the case. Without brackets anything you define there has wider scope you see.
    – Robinson
    Commented Apr 10, 2012 at 19:40
  • 1
    Not what you asked, but I find long case blocks hard to read. If I need scoping or any other complexity, it gets a new method.
    – Jay Bazuzi
    Commented Apr 11, 2012 at 0:01
  • See also stackoverflow.com/q/3652408/292060
    – goodeye
    Commented Sep 8, 2016 at 20:31

4 Answers 4

78

A pair of braces (not brackets -- [] -- and not parentheses -- () -- but braces {}) with zero or more statements in them is a legal statement in C#, and therefore may appear anywhere that a statement may legally appear.

As others have pointed out, the typical reason for doing so is because such a statement introduces a new local variable declaration space, which then defines the scope of the local variables declared within it. (Recall that the "scope" of an element is the region of program text in which the element may be referred to by its unqualified name.)

I note that this is particularly interesting in a switch statement because the scoping rules in a switch are a little bit strange. For details of how strange they are, see "Case 3:" in my article on the subject:

http://ericlippert.com/2009/08/13/four-switch-oddities/

6
  • I've always felt disappointed that C# didn't introduce a smarter switch statement, as the C switch is one of the more bizarre and problematic constructs in programming.
    – Nate C-K
    Commented Apr 17, 2012 at 20:45
  • 6
    @NateC-K: C# did introduce a better switch statement! The C# designers closely examined the shortcomings of the C/C++ switch statement and improved upon it in many ways. For example: (1) The "no fall through" rule eliminates a common source of bugs. (2) You can switch on strings. (3) You can switch on nullable types. (4) The types of the case labels are checked to be compatible with the governing type of the switch. (5) "goto case 1" works properly, unlike in C++. And so on; in almost every conceivable way the C# switch is an improvement. Commented Apr 17, 2012 at 21:15
  • You can switch on strings is one of the more underappreciated features. So many languages don't allow that (e.g., Java or Delphi) and it turns a simple problem into a big if..elseif cascade. Commented Apr 17, 2012 at 21:31
  • 2
    @phoog: I refer you to section 3.3.1 of The C++ Programming Language, 2nd edition (old, I know; it's the one I have handy), which states on page 103 "Note that a case label is not a suitable label for use in a goto statement." Perhaps C++ has added this feature while I wasn't paying attention, but it did not have the feature in 1991, when I was learning C++. Commented Apr 17, 2012 at 23:16
  • 1
    @EricLippert: True, there are some incremental improvements, and I do appreciate them; the C# switch statement is most definitely smarter, so the wording of my earlier statement was unfair. However, it left in the weird C syntax and consequent lack of appropriate scoping. Plus, now there are extra rules to remember that only apply to switch statements. For example, you have to add a break in each case, even though fall-through is forbidden so this is now purely vestigial.
    – Nate C-K
    Commented Apr 19, 2012 at 14:15
71

Braces {} are used to define a scope for a set of operations. Bizarrely, the following will compile and work:

private void ConnectionStateChange(object sender, StateChangeEventArgs e)
{
    string s = "hi";
    switch(s)
    {
        case "hi":
            {
                int a = 1;
                a++;
            }
            {
                int a = 2;
                a++;
            }
            break;
    }

    {
        int a = 1;
        a++;
    }
    {
        int a = 2;
        a++;
    }
}

As you can see, in that one method I've created four variables, each called a. Each is entirely separate because, as local variables, they exist only within their own scope.

Does that make some sort of sense?

13
  • 55
    Why bizarrely? That looks pretty normal (albeit contrived).
    – Joey
    Commented Apr 10, 2012 at 19:51
  • 35
    If having 4 different local variables named a in the same function looks pretty normal to you, you've been looking at the wrong code all this time. :)
    – cHao
    Commented Apr 10, 2012 at 19:54
  • 11
    Hence contrived, but introducing a new local scope isn't that unusual, imho.
    – Joey
    Commented Apr 10, 2012 at 20:04
  • 12
    This should not be considered as bizarre at all.
    – jn1kk
    Commented Apr 10, 2012 at 20:52
  • 2
    How sad that the accepted answer actually fails to explain (or, indeed, obviously to comprehend) why this is useful. Commented Apr 11, 2012 at 14:00
30

It creates a new scope in which you can create new variables.

0
13

It creates new scope for variables you used. Scope of variables can be tricky sometimes. For instance in the code you posted;

switch(x)
{
    case(a):
        {
        int i = 0;
        }
        break;
    case(b):
        i = 1; // Error: The name 'i' doesn't exist in the current context
        break;
}

The error makes sense here as in case(b) variable a is accessed out of scope. Now on the other hand,

switch(x)
{
    case(a):
        {
        int i = 0;
        }
        break;
    case(b):
        int i = 1; // Error: A local variable named 'i' cannot be declared in this scope because it would give a different meaning to 'i', which is already used in a 'child' scope to denote something else
        break;
}

Above two errors look contradictory to each other. To get around this you should define the scope separately in both case statements,

switch(x)
{
    case(a):
        {
        int i = 0;
        }
        break;
    case(b):
        {
        int i = 1; // No error
        }
        break;
}

Eric Lippert shared a very good link to his blog to explain variable scopes in case statement. You should have a look at it.

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