2

What I think is that the binary search requires a sequential order. I don't know if i am wrong or right. Any advice?

4

You can do a binary search without random access. A binary tree, for example, supports binary searching, but not random access (at least as the term is normally used -- constant complexity access to any element in a collection).

The elements do have to be in some order that allows comparison with the key you're searching for, so that you can determine that if the key is greater than some value X, then it is also greater than all other elements that are less than X (or you can use less instead of greater than).

While that relationship doesn't have to correspond to numerical ordering, it does have to give the ability to eliminate a percentage of the elements (not just a single element) from consideration based on comparison with only one element.

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  • Traditional binary tree needs random access (pointers), too. You can pack it in a sequence and only scan it once in one direction, but this will kill most of its efficiency because you won't be able to skip non-matching branches easily; it will become much like a full scan. So, -1. – 9000 Apr 10 '12 at 20:49
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    @9000: How do you equate pointers with random access? Even assuming that the binary tree itself were to use random access, do you think that equates to the client of the binary tree using random access? Do you think that the only possible alternative to random access is sequential access? – Jerry Coffin Apr 10 '12 at 20:55
  • To me, sequential access is what you have when you read from a socket, or from a magnetic tape. No way to cheaply jump ahead, no way to scroll back. Everything else is random access. Pointers is a mechanism for accessing RAM, Random Access Memory. You can't use pointers to access a part of a stream read from a socket, can you? – 9000 Apr 10 '12 at 21:31
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    @9000: "Everything else is random access". This is so obviously wrong it's hardly worthy of discussion. Sequential access means you get directly access to exactly one element at a time. Random access means you get direct access to all elements at any time. A binary tree does not provide direct access to every element at any time, only to two elements, therefore it is not random access. – Jerry Coffin Apr 10 '12 at 21:49
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    If you're going to use "random access" to describe what a binary tree describes, you're left with no term to describe the entirely different situation provided by something like a linear array, which really does provide direct, constant-complexity access to any/every element in the collection. – Jerry Coffin Apr 10 '12 at 21:51
4

You need to be able to jump at random positions (the middle of the current portion), so yes, random access is required. (Also, a requirement is that the collection is ordered). That is, of course, provided your structure is a list/array. If it is a binary tree, you obviously don't need random access.

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2

Yes. A binary search must be able to access all elements of your data structure in a random (non-sequential) way.

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  • okay. thanks dtech I just found the answer implicit in my book. – jesus Sandoval Apr 10 '12 at 20:28
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Yes, it does require random access. The whole idea of a binary search is to sub-divide the search space in a half at each iteration, and for determining the new range of search, indexes are used. If you had to traverse the search space every time just to reach the mid-point, you'd be negating the point of the algorithm.

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1

Binary search is "jumping into the middle". Therefore, some kind of order on the data is necessary (such that middle is well defined) and an indexed access instead of iteration is needed (to be able to jump, otherwise the runtime of O(log(CollectionSize)) wouldn't be possible).

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1

it must be ordered before the search happens , its could be sorted in ascending order or in descending , the difference between these two ordering is where you should look next in the upper half or in lower half and sure based on the key you are looking for

int binary_search(int A[], int key, int imin, int imax)
{
  // test if array is empty
  if (imax < imin):
    // set is empty, so return value showing not found
    return KEY_NOT_FOUND;
  else
    {
      // calculate midpoint to cut set in half
      int imid = (imin + imax) / 2;

      // three-way comparison
      if (A[imid] > key):
        // key is in lower subset
        return binary_search(A, key, imin, imid-1);
      else if (A[imid] < key):
        // key is in upper subset
        return binary_search(A, key, imid+1, imax);
      else:
        // key has been found
        return imid;
    }
}

this work with ascending order if your array in a descending order flip the binary operators like this

// three-way comparison
          if (A[imid] < key):
            // key is in lower subset
            return binary_search(A, key, imin, imid-1);
          else if (A[imid] > key):
            // key is in upper subset
            return binary_search(A, key, imid+1, imax);
          else:
            // key has been found
            return imid;
        }
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0

Its worth adding that Collections.binarySearch method does not require searched list to be instance of RandomAccess, its implementation will accept any List also LinkedList as is seen below:

public static <T>
int binarySearch(List<? extends Comparable<? super T>> list, T key) {
    if (list instanceof RandomAccess || list.size()<BINARYSEARCH_THRESHOLD)
        return Collections.indexedBinarySearch(list, key);
    else
        return Collections.iteratorBinarySearch(list, key);
}

BINARYSEARCH_THRESHOLD is equal to 5000 (JDK 1.8). Of course searching and previously sorting LinkedList is quite inefficient. Also programmers are rather used to think of binary searching in arrays and not linked lists, so the fact that Collections.binarySearch accepts non RandomAccess collections can be suprising.

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