9

i need to check whether a demical is 0 through 49.99 or 50 through 99.99 or 100 through 199.99 or greater than 200. i am trying to do this with select case, but i am not sure of the syntax. please help!

2
  • 1
    Is it integer or float? I ask because of the .99
    – jvanderh
    Jun 17 '09 at 22:50
  • Are you interested in sending to else values between 49.99 and 50?? I'm not clear based on your question.
    – jvanderh
    Jun 17 '09 at 23:04
28
    Select Case aa
        Case 1 To 1.49
            MsgBox(1)
        Case 1.5 To 2
            MsgBox(2)
        Case Else
            MsgBox("was lower than 1 or higher than 2 or between 1.49 and 1.5")
    End Select

this(below) would go into case else

   Dim aa As Double = 1.499

this(below) will go into case 1 to 1.49

   Dim aa As Double = 1.4

this(below) will go into case 1.5 to 2

   Dim aa As Double = 1.78

other way of doing it: From here

    Select Case value
        Case Is <= 49.99
            Debug.WriteLine("first group")
        Case Is <= 99.99
            Debug.WriteLine("second group")
        Case Is <= 199.99
            Debug.WriteLine("third group")
        Case Else
            Debug.WriteLine("fourth group")
    End Select

and maybe this too:

    Select Case true
        Case (value >= 0 andalso value <= 49.99)
            Debug.WriteLine("first group")
        Case (value >= 50 andalso value <= 99.99)
            Debug.WriteLine("second group")
        Case (value >= 100 andalso value <= 199.99)
            Debug.WriteLine("third group")
        Case Else
            Debug.WriteLine("fourth group")
    End Select
6
  • when you say 1 to 2, does it include 1 and 2? Jun 17 '09 at 22:51
  • include anything between 1 and 2
    – Fredou
    Jun 17 '09 at 22:52
  • See jvanderh's answer for something that's even closer to your question. Jun 17 '09 at 23:03
  • 1
    what people think about the select case true?
    – Fredou
    Jun 17 '09 at 23:15
  • 1
    Case True sucks, you can just write an If ElseIf construct then like every normal programmer does :P
    – Ray
    Oct 14 '16 at 11:11
6

I have my doubts that you've framed this question to say exactly what you mean. Do you really want the first group to encompass just 0 through 49.99? Or do you really mean 0 up to but not including 50, and you simply expect your input to have 2 decimal places or fewer? If you want to group numbers by fifties, say, then it is very strange to write:

Select Case value
    Case Is <= 49.99
        Debug.WriteLine("49.99 or less")
    Case Is <= 99.99
        Debug.WriteLine("greater than 49.99, 99.99 or less")
    ' ... and so on '
End Select

The number 49.995 here falls into the second group, which seems counterintuitive. Picking two decimal places as the cut-off point is arbitrary.

The '<=' operator is not the way to go here; use the '<' operator; it makes a lot more sense:

Select Case value
    Case Is < 50
        Debug.WriteLine("less than fifty")
    Case Is < 100
        Debug.WriteLine("fifty or greater, less than 100")
    ' ... and so on '
End Select
6
 Dim value As Double = 133.5
        Select Case value
            Case Is <= 49.99
                Debug.WriteLine("first group")
            Case Is <= 99.99
                Debug.WriteLine("second group")
            Case Is <= 199.99
                Debug.WriteLine("third group")
            Case Else
                Debug.WriteLine("fourth group")
        End Select

Where do values as 49.992 fall in your question? Since you said 0-49.99 and then 50-99.99 anything between 49.99 and 50 where does it go? In my example above it would be included in one of the options so it is values between 0 and 49.99, values between 49.99 and 99.99, etc, etc.

7
  • Beat me to it - this showed up while I was still composing ;) Jun 17 '09 at 23:04
  • I think your answer is better than mine so since mine is marked as accepted, do you allow me to put your into mine?
    – Fredou
    Jun 17 '09 at 23:05
  • If it is better or not depends on the premise of the question which isn't clear. If the intent is to ignore values between 49.99 and 50 then yours is correct. You can copy mine and add it to yours as an option with that clarification.
    – jvanderh
    Jun 17 '09 at 23:08
  • heh I composed my answer then saw this. It's incredible how fast answers show up. Us vision impaired though don't have the ability to see things magically appear on the page through AJAX.
    – user109878
    Jun 17 '09 at 23:13
  • This is a duplicate answer resulting from an answer coming in while I was composing, please delete.
    – user109878
    Jun 17 '09 at 23:16
3

AlbertEin is onto something, but to do integer division like that in VB.Net you have to write it like this:

Dim range as Integer
range = someInteger \ 50

Notice the backwards division symbol. From there you can Select Case range.

But really, jvanderh's answer most expresses what you want to do, because it allows for easy addition of cases in the future that don't break on a multiple of 50 and don't require future maintainers to follow the math or know about the \ operator.

2
Dim range as Integer
range = someInteger / 50
'So, if range = 0 is 0-49.99, if it's 1 it's 50 to 99.99, etc
1
  • VB.Net doesn't do integer division by default: it rounds. Jun 17 '09 at 22:58
1

Why don't you try if/then/else? They are equivalent, and I am not sure if case statement in VBasic can handle non-integers values.

4
  • if/then/else can be compiled differently from a select case statement. Many compilers optimize the select case statement.
    – user109878
    Jun 17 '09 at 22:53
  • But at least for old BASIC languages and Visual Basic, select..case is MUCH faster than if, don't know how it is for VB.NET
    – schnaader
    Jun 17 '09 at 22:53
  • case is faster than tons of if/elseif/elseif/else
    – Fredou
    Jun 17 '09 at 22:59
  • I believe the same still applies to.NET schnaader.
    – user109878
    Jun 17 '09 at 23:09
1

This is how I would do it, I use the # to explicitly state the values are of type "double".

   Dim input As Double = 2.99

    Select Case input
        Case 0.0# To 49.99#
            Response.Write("Between 0 to 49.99")
        Case 50.0# To 99.99#
            Response.Write("Between 50 and 99.99")
        Case Else
            Response.Write("The value did not fall into a range.")
    End Select
1
  • I think you mean 'd' rather than '#' Jun 17 '09 at 23:07
0
Structure employee
    Dim percent As Decimal
    Dim dayname As DayOfWeek
End Structure

Dim emp As employee

 emp.percent = CDec(45.5)
 emp.dayname = DayOfWeek.Friday

Select Case True

    Case (emp.percent >= 0 And emp.percent <= 49.99 
                   And emp.dayname = Now.DayOfWeek)

        MsgBox("Employee percentage   " & emp.percent 
                & "Name of the day  " & Now.DayOfWeek.ToString)

End Select
1
  • Don't put code only please explain how you got the answer.
    – Lakmi
    Dec 29 '17 at 7:03
0

I came across this question but these responses still allow too many things to fall in the gaps.

'In this example, a value of 49.991 - 49.999* will fall in the 99.99 category, where I expect it is intended for the 49.99 category
Select Case value
    Case Is <= 49.99
        Debug.WriteLine("first group")
    Case Is <= 99.99
        Debug.WriteLine("second group")
    Case Is <= 199.99
        Debug.WriteLine("third group")
    Case Else
        Debug.WriteLine("fourth group")
End Select

Instead it is better to reverse the order, to avoid having to specify superfluous decimal places in an effort to close the gaps.

Select Case value
    Case Is >= 200
        Debug.WriteLine("fourth group")
    Case Is >= 100
        Debug.WriteLine("third group")
    Case Is >= 50
        '49.9999* will always fall in this group irrespective of number of decimal places
        Debug.WriteLine("second group")
    Case Else
        Debug.WriteLine("first group")
End Select

The Select Case statement only follows only the first true case so even though subsequent cases may also be true, they will be bypassed if caught by an earlier case.

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