22

Primer: An HTML checkbox can be set as indeterminate, which displays it as neither checked nor unchecked. Even in this indeterminate state, there is still an underlying boolean checked state.

Mac OS X checkboxes in various states


When an indeterminate checkbox is clicked, it loses its indeterminate state. Depending on the browser (Firefox), it can additionally toggle the checked property.

This jsfiddle illustrates the situation. In Firefox, clicking either of the checkboxes once causes them to toggle their initial underlying checked state. In IE, the checked property is left alone for the first click.

I would like all browsers to behave the same, even if this means additional javascript. Unfortunately, the indeterminate property is set to false before the onclick handler (or onchange and jquery change) is called, so I can't detect whether it's called for a click on an indeterminate checkbox or not.

The mouseup and keyup (for spacebar toggle) events show the prior indeterminate state, but I'd rather not be that specific: it seems fragile.

I could maintain a separate property on the checkbox (data-indeterminate or similar), but I wanted to know if there's a simple solution I'm missing, and/or if other people are having similar issues.

5
  • 2
    I think data may be the way to go. Apr 11 '12 at 3:27
  • Safari for windows also leaves the checked alone for the first click
    – Pow-Ian
    Apr 5 '13 at 17:15
  • is what you are looking for a tri-state check box? I ask because the indeterminate property is a visual property only. It is meant to indicate to the user that the value of the check box may need to be changed.
    – Pow-Ian
    Apr 5 '13 at 17:23
  • Yeah, I guess a tri-state is what I was after: we were using it to indicate that some (but not all) of the children of a node were selected. I just wanted all the browsers to behave the same when such a node was clicked.
    – aaaidan
    Apr 7 '13 at 2:58
  • @aaaidan: read this may help you css-tricks.com/indeterminate-checkboxes Apr 8 '13 at 10:07
19

If you would like to have an inderterminate checkbox which becomes checked on all browsers on click (or at least on IE, Chrome and FF5+), you need to initialise the checked attribute correctly, as shown here http://jsfiddle.net/K6nrT/6/. I have written the following functions to help you:

/// Gives a checkbox the inderminate state and the right
/// checked state so that it becomes checked on click
/// on click on IE, Chrome and Firefox 5+
function makeIndeterminate(checkbox)
{
    checkbox.checked = getCheckedStateForIndeterminate();
    checkbox.indeterminate = true;
}

and the interesting function which relies on feature detection:

/// Determine the checked state to give to a checkbox
/// with indeterminate state, so that it becomes checked
/// on click on IE, Chrome and Firefox 5+
function getCheckedStateForIndeterminate()
{
    // Create a unchecked checkbox with indeterminate state
    var test = document.createElement("input");
    test.type = "checkbox";
    test.checked = false;
    test.indeterminate = true;

    // Try to click the checkbox
    var body = document.body;
    body.appendChild(test); // Required to work on FF
    test.click();
    body.removeChild(test); // Required to work on FF

    // Check if the checkbox is now checked and cache the result
    if (test.checked)
    {
        getCheckedStateForIndeterminate = function () { return false; };
        return false;
    }
    else
    {
        getCheckedStateForIndeterminate = function () { return true; };
        return true;
    }
}

No image tricks, no jQuery, no extra attributes and no event handling involved. This relies only on simple JavaScript initialisation (note that the "indeterminate" attribute cannot be set in the HTML markup, so JavaScript initialisation would have been required anyway).

3
  • 4
    Why the downvote? Please provide a scenario where it does not work, so we can make it better
    – Gyum Fox
    Oct 18 '13 at 11:04
  • By the way, I do think your question was correctly identified as a duplicate. I hadn't actually accepted an answer until yours, but we were still wrangling with the exact same problem it seems. :)
    – aaaidan
    Oct 19 '13 at 20:09
  • 2
    Note that the change event isn't fired on IE after checkbox leaves indeterminate state. jsfiddle.net/paska/K6nrT/20
    – Diego
    Jul 17 '15 at 18:45
0

This solved my problem

$(".checkbox").click(function(){
    $(this).change();
});
2
  • While this answer is probably correct and useful, it is preferred if you include some explanation along with it to explain how it helps to solve the problem. This becomes especially useful in the future, if there is a change (possibly unrelated) that causes it to stop working and users need to understand how it once worked. Apr 23 '15 at 12:35
  • when a chcek box is checked by clicking, two event happned at a same time, one is for click and one for change. Now in case of "indeterminate" state, you dont have any click event. So i some browser if you click a "indeterminate" checkbox, it will toggle to "check" (eg: chrome) but for IE it will be "uncheck". To sych, this code can be helpful $(".checkbox").click(function(e){ e.preventDefault(); $(this).change(); }); Apr 24 '15 at 7:57
0

I am not sure that will using function to set value for indeterminate checkboxes will be good solutions because:

  • you will have to change every place where you are using them,
  • if user submit form without clicking on check-boxes, value that your backend will receive will be different depending of browser.

But I like clever way to determinate how browser works. So you could check isCheckedAfterIndeterminate() instead usual window.navigator.userAgent.indexOf('Trident') >= 0 to see is it IE (or maybe other browser that works in unusual way).

So my solution will be:

/// Determine the checked state to give to a checkbox
/// with indeterminate state, so that it becomes checked
/// on click on IE, Chrome and Firefox 5+
function isCheckedAfterIndeterminate()
{
    // Create a unchecked checkbox with indeterminate state
    var test = document.createElement("input");
    test.type = "checkbox";
    test.checked = false;
    test.indeterminate = true;

    // Try to click the checkbox
    var body = document.body;
    body.appendChild(test); // Required to work on FF
    test.click();
    body.removeChild(test); // Required to work on FF

    // Check if the checkbox is now checked and cache the result
    if (test.checked) {
        isCheckedAfterIndeterminate = function () { return false; };
        return false;
    } else {
        isCheckedAfterIndeterminate = function () { return true; };
        return true;
    }
}

// Fix indeterminate checkbox behavoiur for some browsers.
if ( isCheckedAfterIndeterminate() ) {
    $(function(){
        $(document).on('mousedown', 'input', function(){
            // Only fire the change event if the input is indeterminate.
            if ( this.indeterminate ) {
                this.indeterminate = false;
                $(this).trigger('change');
            }
        });
    });
}
-1
+50

Well make your own clickable image and use some java(script) to make it behave like that. I doubt dough how many users would understand this state, so be carefull where you use it.

10
  • 1
    thanks, well i am glad that i finally could help someone here.
    – user613326
    Apr 3 '13 at 20:06
  • 1
    Glad this helps Connor, but I have reservations about using an image instead of a form element because accessibility is important in my case. It also means you can't use the operating system's checkbox, which some people might like.
    – aaaidan
    Apr 5 '13 at 1:05
  • 1
    Yep, I think that's the consensus, Connor: if you want to use "built-in" form elements force it to behave the same across browsers, maintaining some kind of data-indeterminate property with javascript is the only option. Cheers!
    – aaaidan
    Apr 7 '13 at 3:00
  • 1
    i am just wondering aaiden logs a problem and Connor sets a bounty on the question ?
    – user613326
    Apr 7 '13 at 22:00
  • 1
    @ConnorGurney Because the answer wasn't accepted as best answer, user613326 will only get half, unless you manually award the whole bounty! Just and FYI.
    – Jesse
    Apr 8 '13 at 11:39

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