18

I found a goodlooking example about implementation enums in a different way. That is called type-safe enum pattern i think. I started using it but i realized that i can not use it in a switch statement.
My implementation looks like the following:

public sealed class MyState
{
    private readonly string m_Name;
    private readonly int m_Value;

    public static readonly MyState PASSED= new MyState(1, "OK");
    public static readonly MyState FAILED= new MyState(2, "ERROR");

    private MyState(int value, string name)
    {
        m_Name = name;
        m_Value = value;
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return m_Name;
    }

    public int GetIntValue()
    {
        return m_Value;
    }
}

What can i add to my class in order to be able to use this pattern in switch statements in C#?
Thanks.

15
  • 2
    What is insufficiently "type-safe" about the standard enum implementation? – Cody Gray Apr 11 '12 at 5:33
  • GetIntValue should be a property called Value or ID. You can switch that property – Gilad Naaman Apr 11 '12 at 5:35
  • Agree with @CodyGray, the whole point of enums is type safety. – harpo Apr 11 '12 at 5:36
  • 1
    @CodyGray refer to this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/424366/c-sharp-string-enums . i took the implementation from the answer of this question. And i thought it is like a standart design pattern for enums. Well, i think i will have to think an other way to do my goal. Thanks. – Fer Apr 11 '12 at 5:56
  • 4
    @Fer your class usage instead of enums is absolutely correct. I never use enums in C#, for many reasons. – Alex Burtsev Apr 11 '12 at 16:43
9

You can try something like this:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Gender gender = Gender.Unknown;

        switch (gender)
        {
            case Gender.Enum.Male:
                break;
            case Gender.Enum.Female:
                break;
            case Gender.Enum.Unknown:
                break;
        }
    }
}

public class Gender : NameValue
{
    private Gender(int value, string name)
        : base(value, name)
    {
    }

    public static readonly Gender Unknown = new Gender(Enum.Unknown, "Unknown");
    public static readonly Gender Male = new Gender(Enum.Male, "Male");
    public static readonly Gender Female = new Gender(Enum.Female, "Female");
    public class Enum
    {
        public const int Unknown = -1;
        public const int Male = 1;
        public const int Female = 2;
    }

}

public abstract class NameValue
{
    private readonly int _value;
    private readonly string _name;

    protected NameValue(int value, string name)
    {
        _value = value;
        _name = name;
    }

    public int Value
    {
        get { return _value; }
    }

    public string Name
    {
        get { return _name; }
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return Name;
    }
    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return Value.GetHashCode();
    }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        NameValue other = obj as NameValue;
        if (ReferenceEquals(other, null)) return false;
        return this.Value == other.Value;
    }

    public static implicit operator int(NameValue nameValue)
    {
        return nameValue.Value;
    }
}
1
  • 2
    This is a bit clumsy, but it does work. The only problem I'm having is the additional nested class with constants that I don't like, but has to be used in order to provide constant values in switch statement cases. Any other way maybe? – Robert Koritnik Jun 19 '12 at 14:50
8

The type-safe enum pattern is interesting because you can add behavior to individual enum members (which are instances). So, if the behavior you want to switch-on could be part of the class, just use polymorphism. Note that you might need to create subclasses for each member that overrides the behavior:

public class MyState {

  public static readonly MyState Passed = new MyStatePassed();
  public static readonly MyState Failed = new MyStateFailed();

  public virtual void SomeLogic() {
    // default logic, or make it abstract
  }

  class MyStatePassed : MyState {
    public MyStatePassed() : base(1, "OK") { }
  }
  class MyStateFailed : MyState {
    public MyStateFailed() : base(2, "Error") { }
    public override void SomeLogic() { 
      // Error specific logic!
    }
  }

  ...
}

Usage:

MyState state = ...
state.someLogic();

Now, if the logic clearly doesn't belong and you really want to switch, my advice is to create a sibling enum:

public enum MyStateValue { 
  Passed = 1, Failed = 2
}
public sealed class MyState {
  public static readonly MyState Passed = new MyState(MyStateValue.Passed, "OK");
  public static readonly MyState Failed = new MyState(MyStateValue.Failed, "Error");

  public MyStateValue Value { get; private set; }

  private MyState(MyStateValue value, string name) {
    ...
  }
}

And switch on that:

switch (state.Value) {
  case MyStateValue.Passed: ...
  case MyStateValue.Failed: ...
}

In this case, if the type-safe enum class doesn't have any behavior, there's not much reason for it to exist in place of the enum itself. But of course, you can have logic and a sibling enum at the same time.

1
  • 1
    thank you very much for your interest. i tried your second choise and it works(creating sibling enums.) For now, the answer of @AlexBurtsev seems more generic for my stuation. but i will keep in my your solution too. Thank you. it really helped – Fer Apr 12 '12 at 5:48
2

Jordão has the right idea, but there is a better way to implement the polymorphism, use delegate.

The use of delegates is faster than a switch statement. (In fact, I am a strong believer that the only place for switch statements in object-oriented development is in a factory method. I always look for some sort of polymorphism to replace any switch statements in any code i deal with.)

For example, if you want a specific behavior based on a type-safe-enum, the following pattern is what I use:

public sealed class EnumExample
{
    #region Delegate definitions
    /// <summary>
    /// This is an example of adding a method to the enum. 
    /// This delegate provides the signature of the method.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="input">A parameter for the delegate</param>
    /// <returns>Specifies the return value, in this case a (possibly 
    /// different) EnumExample</returns>
    private delegate EnumExample DoAction(string input);
    #endregion

    #region Enum instances
    /// <summary>
    /// Description of the element
    /// The static readonly makes sure that there is only one immutable 
    /// instance of each.
    /// </summary>
    public static readonly EnumExample FIRST = new EnumExample(1,
        "Name of first value",    
        delegate(string input)
           {
               // do something with input to figure out what state comes next
               return result;
           }
    );
    ...
    #endregion

    #region Private members
    /// <summary>
    /// The string name of the enum
    /// </summary>
    private readonly string name;
    /// <summary>
    /// The integer ID of the enum
    /// </summary>
    private readonly int value;
    /// <summary>
    /// The method that is used to execute Act for this instance
    /// </summary>
    private readonly DoAction action;
    #endregion

    #region Constructors
    /// <summary>
    /// This constructor uses the default value for the action method
    /// 
    /// Note all constructors are private to prevent creation of instances 
    /// by any other code
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="value">integer id for the enum</param>
    /// <param name="name">string value for the enum</param>
    private EnumExample(int value, string name) 
            : this (value, name, defaultAction)
    {
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// This constructor sets all the values for a single instance.
    /// All constructors should end up calling this one.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="value">the integer ID for the enum</param>
    /// <param name="name">the string value of the enum</param>
    /// <param name="action">the method used to Act</param>
    private EnumExample(int value, string name, DoAction action)
    {
        this.name = name;
        this.value = value;
        this.action = action;
    }
    #endregion

    #region Default actions
    /// <summary>
    /// This is the default action for the DoAction delegate
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="input">The inpute for the action</param>
    /// <returns>The next Enum after the action</returns>
    static private EnumExample defaultAction(string input)
    {
        return FIRST;
    }
    #endregion

    ...
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.