1

I have two different services running on a web server. Both the services have an operation named 'xyz', with the following arguments.

Service 1:

Public String xyx(Student object) {}

Service 2:

public String xyz(Employee object){}

Now i have a client which will invoke the operation of one of these services based on the message that it receives. The message will be received as a camel exchange. So i need to identify the type of the message and then invoke the appropriate service.

How do i identify the original type of the message that is received as a camel exchange.

Thanks.

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  • Just a thought by why not dump the headers to the log component which will print them to the terminal. Maybe there is something in the headers that can help you identify how to differentiate them.
    – Namphibian
    Commented Apr 11, 2012 at 5:44

4 Answers 4

11

Or you can do something like this:

from("foo:incommingroute")
    .choice()
        .when(simple("${body} is 'java.lang.String'"))
            .to("webservice:Student")
        .when(simple("${body} is 'foo.bar.Employee'"))
            .to("webservice:Employee")
        .otherwise()
            .to("jms:Deadletter")
        .end();
6

Try exchange.getIn().getBody() instanceof Student

0
6

I would set the a value in the header to indicate which service it is and then send this off on the camel route. This approach is just but one way of doing this. Christian Schneider has another excellent solution which I will probably use much more now that I have gotten much more into Camel then ever before. However both will achieve the same thing and depending on who you ask one might be more clear than the other.

For example you can do:

public void foo(Exchange exchange){

 exchange.getIn().setHeader("MsgType", "Student");

}

You can then filter on the header in either the Java DSL or even spring DSL.

In Java DSL you would do something like this (pseudo code)

from("foo:incommingroute")
.choice()
.when(header("MsgType").equals("Student"))
    .to("webservice:Student")
.when(header("MsgType").equals("Employee"))
    .to("webservice:Employee")
.otherwise()
    .to("jms:Deadletter")
.end();

In Spring DSL you would do something like this (pseudo code)

<route>
 <from uri="foo:incommingroute"/>
   <choice>
     <when>
       <simple>${header.MsgType} equals 'Student'</simple>
       <to uri="webservice:Student"/>
    </when>
    <when>
      <simple>${header.MsgType} equals 'Employee'</simple>
      <to uri="webservice:Employee"/>
   </when>
   <otherwise>
      <to uri="jms:badOrders"/>
   <stop/>
 </otherwise>
 </choice>
 <to uri="jms:Deadletter"/>
</route>

You can also look at the enricher pattern at this link http://camel.apache.org/content-enricher.html. Basically what I am suggesting is following the enricher pattern. If you could tell me how you are sending messages to Camel then I could probably help more.

Hope this give you some ideas and if there is syntax mistakes etc in the code sorry I am at a bus stop and did not have time to check it.

3

I prefer to write this type of logic directly in the route definition rather than in a Processor. Here is the Camel DSL approach that uses a Predicate to determine the body class type. It assumes that you have already deserialized the Exchange body into a Student or Employee object.

choice()
  .when(body().isInstanceOf(Student.class))
    .to(...)
  .when(body().isInstanceOf(Employee.class))
    .to(...)
.end()

If you're going to perform various transformations on the body throughout the route, resulting in a variety of Student or Employee object types at various stages (e.g. a Student then a StudentEntity, etc) then saving the type in a header or property as some String constant at the beginning of the route might be the cleaner approach.

// Note that this labelling could be bundled into a processor
choice()
  .when(body().isInstanceOf(Student.class))
    .setProperty("TYPE", "STUDENT")
  .when(body().isInstanceOf(Employee.class))
    .setProperty("TYPE", "EMPLOYEE")
.end()


// later after some body transformations
.choice()
  .when(exchangeProperty("TYPE").isEqualTo("STUDENT"))
    // process student

Lastly, you might be able to do everything in a processor but I think this sort of branch logic combined with service invocation is a Camel anti-pattern.

class MyProcessor implements Processor {
  @Override
  public void process(Exchange exchange) {
    Object body = exchange.getIn().getBody()
    if (body instanceOf Student) {
      // invoke StudentService
    } else if (body instanceOf Employee) {
      // invoke EmployeeService
    }
  }
}

// Route definition
from(...)
  .process(myProcessor)
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