14

If my list is empty, I want to output this:

<div id="some-id">
</div>

If my list is non-empty, I want to output this:

<div id="some-id">
  <ul>
    <li>Item 1</li>
    <li>Item 2</li>
    <li>etc</li>
  </ul>
</div>

Note that I output the <ul> and </ul> tags at most once, and only if the list is non-empty.

The following code is close to how I would do this in PHP, but is obviously wrong:

<div id="some-id">
{{#items}}
  <ul>
{{/items}}

{{#items}}
    <li>{{name}}</li>
{{/items}}

{{#items}}
  </ul>
{{/items}}
</div>

If items is a 3 item list, I'm going to get 3 <ul>'s - obviously not what I want.

I realise I could set some other key as a boolean flag (hasItems, perhaps), but this feels redundant.

Is there a more elegant way I can output a block only once for a non-empty list?

  • 1
    In my opinion (and 4 years later) there is still no satisfying solution for this problem in "mustache" afaik. we would need the opposite of an "inverted section" - a section that renders only once if the key's value is truthy (key exists, non-empty list, key value is true,...) ! – low_rents Jun 29 '16 at 12:19
5

You could use non-false values of a section. name would have to be an object inside of items

data = { 'items' : { 'name' : ["Item 1", "Item 2", "etc"] } };

You template would look like:

<div id="some-id">
    {{#items}}
    <ul>
        {{#name}}
        <li>{{.}}</li>
        {{/name}}
    </ul>
    {{/items}}
</div>

Here's an example on jsFiddle showing the rendering of an items object with names and without -- http://jsfiddle.net/maxbeatty/fpQwk/

  • Hmmm. That's an interesting idea. I'd probably represent the data as { 'itemsContainer' : { 'items' : [ { 'name' : 'item 1' }, { 'name' : 'item 2' }, { 'name' : 'etc' } ] } };. Thanks! – G Mawr Apr 12 '12 at 11:14
  • 7
    having to change data structure only because the template rendiring doesn't support the specific case seems to me very limiting. – ElLocoCocoLoco Sep 27 '13 at 14:23
  • if you don't want to change your data structure, change your template engine – maxbeatty Oct 9 '13 at 23:19
16

If you don't want to or can't reformat your data or templating engine, you can also just check items.length before rendering the <ul> tags. Some people frown upon this, but it's definitely an alternative to Max's answer.

{{#items.length}}
    <ul>
        {{items}}
            <li>{{name}}</li>
        {{/items}}
    </ul>
{{/items.length}}
  • 5
    Nice. That'd only work with a JavaScript implementation of JavaScript, though, right? – G Mawr Mar 10 '14 at 14:04
  • 1
    yea, but most languages have some sort of property or method that you can check to get the length of the array... with java, it's .size, etc. So it should translate to most languages. – broox Aug 27 '14 at 14:51
  • 1
    I'm using the PHP version of Mustache which has a count function, not property or method. However, I just tried this with an ArrayIterator and {{#items.count}} works as expected. Which is great. Thanks! – G Mawr Aug 29 '14 at 14:16
  • 1
    Having this functionality language-dependent is only a bit better than having to change model structure to fit into view – Askar Kalykov Aug 18 '17 at 15:43
1

The other two answers do not work for the Ruby implementation of Mustache. My solution was to send an additional parameter as part of the template context; e.g.

template = <<EOF
{{#has_items}}
<ul>
    {{#items}}
        <li>{{.}}</li>
    {{/items}}
</ul>
{{/has_items}}
EOF
items = ['one', 'two', 'three']
context = { items: items, has_items: items.any? }
Mustache.render(template, context)

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