35

I'm working on a bash-script that has to prepare an E-Mail for being sent to a user.

It aggregates some data, which ends up being multiple lines of stuff. For the example stored in $DATA.

Now, after a bit of stfw I found a few things like sed -ei "s/_data_/${DATA}/g" mail.tpl and also sed replace with variable with multiple lines. None of them work.

Now the question is, how do I get sed to replace something with multiple lines of text?

(Alternatives to sed are also welcome!)

6
  • 1
    possible duplicate of sed replace with variable with multiple lines – Zsolt Botykai Apr 11 '12 at 14:06
  • 2
    @ZsoltBotykai You dont say? :D I even mentioned it in my question... – Cobra_Fast Apr 11 '12 at 14:07
  • As an aside, don't use uppercase for your private shell variables. – tripleee Mar 11 '18 at 12:23
  • @tripleee why not? – Cobra_Fast Mar 11 '18 at 15:44
  • Because that's how you avoid inadvertent clashes with reserved variables, which are uppercase. There's no consensus on what exactly this means but your script's private variables are definitely not "system variables" as intended in this clause in POSIX. See stackoverflow.com/q/673055/874188 – tripleee Mar 11 '18 at 15:54
16

If you build your multiple line text with "\n"s, this will work with a simple sed command as:

DATA=`echo ${DATA} | tr '\n' "\\n"`
#now, DATA="line1\nline2\nline3"
sed "s/_data_/${DATA}/" mail.tpl
5
  • 5
    I'm getting sed: -e expression #1, char 32: unterminated 's' command from that method. – Cobra_Fast Apr 11 '12 at 14:20
  • 1
    This is not entirely portable; not all sed dialects accept the \n digraph to represent a literal newline. In some other dialects, you will probably need to use a backslash before a literal newline. Other answers on this page show you how to do that in more detail. – tripleee Jul 6 '17 at 4:11
  • 7
    Looking at this again, I don't think there is any version of tr which can replace one character with two characters; it's simply the wrong tool for this job. The newlines are lost by accident because you incorrectly fail to quote the argument to echo, but this has multiple other undesirable side effects; and the tr simply does nothing at all here. This should not be the accepted answer. – tripleee Mar 11 '18 at 12:26
  • Yes does not work for me either. Try this solution (below) – TechupBusiness Apr 15 '19 at 15:26
  • 1
    Given that the shell is Bash, then there's no need for the (broken) tr invocation - just use ${DATA//$'\n'/\\n}. – Toby Speight Aug 14 '19 at 13:08
24

You can do this with AWK using variable substitution. We can set a variable in AWK using -v, and then use AWK's gsub function to substitute all occurrences of a regular expression with that variable.

For example, if the file test has the following contents ...

foo
bar
blah _data_and_data_
foo
_data_ foobar _data_ again

... and the Bash variable $DATA is ...

1
2
3
4
5

... then awk -v r=$DATA '{gsub(/_data_/,r)}1' test replaces all occurrences of the regular expression _data_ in the file test with the contents of $DATA, resulting in the following:

foo
bar
blah 1
2
3
4
5and1
2
3
4
5
foo
1
2
3
4
5 foobar 1
2
3
4
5 again
5
  • 5
    Oh my god, this WORKS! I wish I could +1 you several more times, you saved me man! – Camilo Martin Dec 21 '13 at 0:11
  • 3
    Hey Kent, this is an old one, but you seem to be missing quotes around $DATA. confirm? – glenn jackman Feb 13 '14 at 1:53
  • 2
    should add quotes indeed: awk -v r="$DATA" '{gsub(/_data_/,r)}1' test – Alec Istomin Sep 6 '17 at 18:39
  • 1
    Apparently some (?) Awks will dislike this and say "newline in string" (though the answer without double quotes around DATA will fail in different ways). – tripleee Mar 11 '18 at 12:45
  • a short explanation for awk-noobs would be nice – lucidbrot May 8 '18 at 7:01
15

I would suggest simply replacing sed with perl command like this:

perl -i.bak -pe 's/_data_/$ENV{"DATA"}/g' mail.tpl 
3
  • 1
    This is the only that worked for me on OSX. All the other sed and awk based approches failed fo me. – Cédric Vidal Dec 1 '17 at 13:45
  • 4
    This will fail in unsettling ways if DATA contains a slash. But you can export DATA and access it from inside Perl as $ENV{"DATA"} without getting code and data mixed up. So 's/_data_/$ENV{"DATA"}/g' simply. – tripleee Mar 11 '18 at 12:22
  • 1
    @anubhava and @tripleee, you saved my day. This is the only solution that worked for me: neither sed nor awk could do the trick. Thanks. – Dmytro Titov Jul 4 '19 at 14:37
11

I tried it and sed 's/pattern/\na\nb\nc/g' but it does not work on all systems. What does work is putting a \ followed by a newline in the replace pattern, like this:

sed 's/pattern/a\
b\
c/g'

This appends a line containing b and a line containing c when the pattern is seen.

To put it in a variable, use double backslashes:

export DATA="\\
a\\
b\\
c"

and then:

sed "s/pattern/${DATA}/g"

Note the double quotes.

8

ring bearer's answer didn't work for me; I think the usage of tr there is wrong, and the way it's written, it simply strips away newlines by use of echo.

Instead, I used sed. I used code from another answer to replace newlines (credit: Zsolt Botykai). I also expected some dollar signs ($) in my input so I took care of that too. You might need to add other input handling. Note the use of double quotes in echo to preserve newlines.

DATA="$(cat whatever)"
ESCAPED_DATA="$(echo "${DATA}" | sed ':a;N;$!ba;s/\n/\\n/g' | sed 's/\$/\\$/g')"

Then you can use ${ESCAPED_DATA} in sed:

cat input | sed 's/one liner/'"${ESCAPED_DATA}"'/' > output 

Just thought I'd share.

1
  • This works well also when multi-line strings have been built in a bash script with $'\n' construct (the cat in the beginning is, of course, then not needed since the string is already in a variable). – Ville Jul 30 '17 at 21:43
7

Echo variable into temporary text file.

Insert text file into mail.tpl and delete data from mail.tpl

echo ${DATA} > temp.txt    
sed -i -e "/_data_/r temp.txt" -e "//d" mail.tpl
1
  • 1
    This is the only one that worked for me after trying many other solutions. – Kevin Oct 6 '20 at 21:43
2

You can put your data in a temp file and run:

$ sed '/_data_/r DATA_FILE' mail.tpl | sed '/_data_/d'> temp; mv temp mail.tpl
0
2

Escaping all the newlines with a \ (except the last one) worked for me. The last newline must not be escaped not to break the s command.

Example :

DATA="a
b
c"

ESCAPED=$(echo "${DATA}" | sed '$!s@$@\\@g')
echo "${ESCAPED}" 
a\
b\
c

sed "s/pattern/${ESCAPED}/" file
1

Not sure if you have tried to put "\n" in the replace part

sed 's/[pattern]/\
[line 1]\n\
[line 2]\n\
[line n]\n\
/g' mail.tpl

The first line has /\ for readibility reasons. Each line after that is a stand-alone line like you would find in a text editor. Last line is stand-alone, once again for readability reasons. You can make all of this one line if needed. Works on Debian Jessie when I tested it.

1

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.