5

How to make function in postgres that would take string or array and return all combinations of some length?

For example you have ABC and you want to get combinations with 2 characters, the result shoul be:

AB AC BC

Thank you in advance for your help.

  • 1
    Why would you do that in a DBMS? Can't you do that at an application level? – Mosty Mostacho Apr 11 '12 at 18:11
  • I could be of use in a sudoku-solver ;-) – wildplasser Apr 11 '12 at 18:42
  • I would use this in multiple programing languages and just one database PostgreSQL, so i was thinking that this would be the easiest way just to have this on one place. This don't have to be joined string, I just give sugestion how should work. – ffox003 Apr 12 '12 at 5:03
11
set search_path='tmp';

WITH ztab AS (
SELECT idx as idx
, substring ( 'WTF!' FROM idx FOR 1) as str
FROM generate_series(1, char_length( 'WTF!' )) idx
)
SELECT t1.str, t2.str
FROM ztab t1
JOIN ztab t2 ON t2.idx > t1.idx
        ;

Result:

 str | str 
-----+-----
 W   | T
 W   | F
 W   | !
 T   | F
 T   | !
 F   | !
(6 rows)

Unfortunately I cannot find a way to avoid the double string constant. (but the whole thing could be packed into a function) If there are no duplicate characters (or you want to suppres them) you could do the anti-join on the str instead of the idx.

UPDATE (hint from ypercube) It appears that the OP wants the strings to be concatenated. So be it::

WITH ztab AS (
SELECT idx as idx
, substring ( 'WTF!' FROM idx FOR 1) as str
FROM generate_series(1, char_length( 'WTF!' )) idx
)
SELECT t1.str || t2.str AS results
FROM ztab t1
JOIN ztab t2 ON t2.idx > t1.idx
        ;

Results:

 results 
---------
 WT
 WF
 W!
 TF
 T!
 F!
(6 rows)

UPDATE2: (here comes the recursive thingy...)

WITH RECURSIVE xtab AS (
        WITH no_cte AS (
        SELECT
        1::int AS len
        , idx as idx
        , substring ( 'WTF!' FROM idx FOR 1) as str
        FROM generate_series(1, char_length( 'WTF!' )) idx
        )
        SELECT t0.len as len
                , t0.idx
                , t0.str
        FROM no_cte t0
        UNION SELECT 1+t1.len
                , tc.idx
                , t1.str || tc.str AS str
        FROM xtab t1
        JOIN no_cte tc ON tc.idx > t1.idx
        )
SELECT * FROM xtab
ORDER BY len, str
-- WHERE len=2
        ;

Results 3:

 len | idx | str  
-----+-----+------
   1 |   4 | !
   1 |   3 | F
   1 |   2 | T
   1 |   1 | W
   2 |   4 | F!
   2 |   4 | T!
   2 |   3 | TF
   2 |   4 | W!
   2 |   3 | WF
   2 |   2 | WT
   3 |   4 | TF!
   3 |   4 | WF!
   3 |   4 | WT!
   3 |   3 | WTF
   4 |   4 | WTF!
(15 rows)
  • Nice solution ! – ypercubeᵀᴹ Apr 11 '12 at 18:44
  • Tnx! I don't think the generate_series() function accepts text arguments(I didn't even look that up), so this ugly hack really is a way around that. – wildplasser Apr 11 '12 at 18:47
  • What ugly hack ?! (oh, and the Select should be something like SELECT t1.str || t2.str AS result or SELECT t1.str AS str1, t2.str AS str2) – ypercubeᵀᴹ Apr 11 '12 at 18:51
  • Yes, you are right of course. I don't like string operations in a DBMS, I prefer seeing things in the Light of the Relational Model ... – wildplasser Apr 11 '12 at 19:28
  • OK, then the challenge is to generalize the query to accept a parameter (n) for the length of the number of characters to use. Instead of the constant 2 in yours :) – ypercubeᵀᴹ Apr 11 '12 at 19:53
2
with chars as (
   select unnest(regexp_split_to_array('ABC','')) as c
)
select c1.c||c2.c
from chars c1
  cross join chars c2

To remove permutations you can use the following:

with chars as (
   select unnest(regexp_split_to_array('ABC','')) as c
)
select c1.c||c2.c
from chars c1
  cross join chars c2
where c1.c < c2.c
  • That looks a lot more elegant than mine ;-( as I said: I don't like strings. BTW does it suppress the permutations? – wildplasser Apr 11 '12 at 21:08
  • @wildplasser: you mean treat AB and BA alike? I edited my answer – a_horse_with_no_name Apr 11 '12 at 22:35
  • That's what I meant. A similar issue would be duplicate characters in the string, such as "ABBA". (this was not addressed in the OP) – wildplasser Apr 11 '12 at 22:40
  • @wildplasser: I think duplicates can easily be handled by adding a distinct to the inner select query. So that the CTE only returns each character once – a_horse_with_no_name Apr 11 '12 at 22:41
  • Yep. But the c1.c < c2.c tiebreaker already handles (part of) that. BTW My "ABBA" example was wrong, I should have said "barabas" – wildplasser Apr 11 '12 at 22:59
0

How to works with multiple words... inspired from @wildplasser and from this source info

WITH RECURSIVE xtab AS (
    WITH no_cte AS (
    SELECT
    1::int AS len
    , idx as idx
    , unnest(ARRAY['MY','POSTGRESQL','VERSION','9.6']) as str
    FROM generate_series(1, array_length(ARRAY['MY','POSTGRESQL','VERSION','9.6'],1)) idx
    )
    SELECT t0.len as len
            , t0.idx
            , t0.str
    FROM no_cte t0
    UNION SELECT 1+t1.len
            , tc.idx
            , t1.str ||','|| tc.str AS str
    FROM xtab t1
    JOIN no_cte tc ON tc.idx > t1.idx
    )
    SELECT distinct
    array_to_string(ARRAY(SELECT DISTINCT trim(x) FROM unnest(string_to_array(str,',')) x),', ') FROM xtab

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