172

I'm building an installer for an application. The user gets to select a datasource they have configured and nominate what type of database it is. I want to confirm that the database type is indeed Oracle, and if possible, what version of Oracle they are running by sending a SQL statement to the datasource.

2
  • What about your programming language? This kind of question really depends on the language API for the DB access.
    – gizmo
    Sep 19, 2008 at 11:29
  • I can assume I have a JDBC datasource. If the connection fails, or the sql statement generates and error then I can certainly trap that and treat it accordingly.
    – modius
    Sep 19, 2008 at 11:37

11 Answers 11

295

Run this SQL:

select * from v$version;

And you'll get a result like:

BANNER
----------------------------------------------------------------
Oracle Database 10g Release 10.2.0.3.0 - 64bit Production
PL/SQL Release 10.2.0.3.0 - Production
CORE    10.2.0.3.0      Production
TNS for Solaris: Version 10.2.0.3.0 - Production
NLSRTL Version 10.2.0.3.0 - Production
10
  • 2
    All versions of Oracle I have ever used. I can't speak for Oracle 5.0 and before! Sep 19, 2008 at 15:49
  • 1
    This technique failed for me on Oracle 11.2.0.2.0, but I am having some login permission problems. However, for those that might be in the same boat as me, the second technique mentioned on this page by Lawrence did work: select * from product_component_version
    – sugardaddy
    Feb 23, 2015 at 14:51
  • 1
    Doesn't work if you don't have permission to v$views. Lawrence's answer has an answer for that Mar 9, 2016 at 2:43
  • @TonyAndrews: What is the output like when select * from v$version; fails? Jul 19, 2016 at 11:57
  • @AtmeshMishra: I'm not sure - maybe ORA-00942: table or view does not exist? What do you get? Jul 20, 2016 at 8:41
47

Two methods:

select * from v$version;

will give you:

Oracle Database 11g Enterprise Edition Release 11.1.0.6.0 - 64bit Production
PL/SQL Release 11.1.0.6.0 - Production
CORE 11.1.0.6.0 Production
TNS for Solaris: Version 11.1.0.6.0 - Production
NLSRTL Version 11.1.0.6.0 - Production

OR Identifying Your Oracle Database Software Release:

select * from product_component_version;

will give you:

PRODUCT VERSION STATUS
NLSRTL  11.1.0.6.0  Production
Oracle Database 11g Enterprise Edition  11.1.0.6.0  64bit Production
PL/SQL  11.1.0.6.0  Production
TNS for Solaris:    11.1.0.6.0  Production
2
  • great... i needed product_component_version.. as i didnt have access to v$ views
    – ShoeLace
    Mar 3, 2014 at 13:38
  • That second query is far more suitable for automatic checking, as it requires defines a data format, rather than relying on ad-hoc parsing. Thanks for posting!
    – jpaugh
    Sep 19, 2016 at 20:14
30
SQL> SELECT version FROM v$instance;
VERSION
-----------------
11.2.0.3.0
5
  • 1
    Best answer since it just gives the version number only, hence no need to parse the output to extract version in an automated script.
    – pseudocode
    Jan 10, 2013 at 0:03
  • @omeinush Works perfectly with me (11.2.0.3 ).
    – collapsar
    Jun 14, 2016 at 10:09
  • @tjati It appears to be dependent not on the version, but on the user permissions. V$INSTANCE is apparently not globally available by default.
    – jpmc26
    Sep 21, 2018 at 16:28
  • It does not work on Oracle 18c: SQL> SELECT version FROM v$instance; SELECT version FROM v$instance * ERROR at line 1: ORA-00942: table or view does not exist Feb 18, 2021 at 8:25
  • Requires dba privilege. Apr 23, 2021 at 9:14
7

You can either use

SELECT * FROM v$version;

or

SET SERVEROUTPUT ON
EXEC dbms_output.put_line( dbms_db_version.version );

if you don't want to parse the output of v$version.

3

If your instance is down, you are look for version information in alert.log

Or another crude way is to look into Oracle binary, If DB in hosted on Linux, try strings on Oracle binary.

strings -a $ORACLE_HOME/bin/oracle |grep RDBMS | grep RELEASE
2

For Oracle use:

Select * from v$version;

For SQL server use:

Select @@VERSION as Version

and for MySQL use:

Show variables LIKE "%version%";
1

There are different ways to check Oracle Database Version. Easiest way is to run the below SQL query to check Oracle Version.

SQL> SELECT * FROM PRODUCT_COMPONENT_VERSION;
SQL> SELECT * FROM v$version;
0

The following SQL statement:

select edition,version from v$instance

returns:

  • database edition eg. "XE"
  • database version eg. "12.1.0.2.0"

(select privilege on the v$instance view is of course necessary)

3
  • @Prokhozhii - We now use 19 so i can no longer confirm but I would appreciate it if you could provide additional explanation as select version from v$instance definitely works in Oracle 11 . See answer stackoverflow.com/a/8135737/3051627 above. (are you 100% sure the user has access to v$instance on your database?)
    – Pancho
    Sep 15, 2020 at 13:10
  • SQL> select edition,version from v$instance; select edition,version from v$instance * ERROR at line 1: ORA-00904: "EDITION": invalid identifier
    – Prokhozhii
    Sep 15, 2020 at 13:32
0

We can use the below Methods to get the version Number of Oracle.

Method No : 1

set serveroutput on;
BEGIN 
DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE(DBMS_DB_VERSION.VERSION || '.' || DBMS_DB_VERSION.RELEASE); 
END;

Method No : 2

SQL> select *
  2  from v$version;
0

This will work starting from Oracle 10

select version
      , regexp_substr(banner, '[^[:space:]]+', 1, 4) as edition 
from    v$instance
     ,  v$version where regexp_like(banner, 'edition', 'i');
-1

Here's a simple function:

CREATE FUNCTION fn_which_edition
        RETURN VARCHAR2
    IS

    /*

        Purpose: determine which database edition

        MODIFICATION HISTORY
        Person      Date        Comments
        ---------   ------      -------------------------------------------
        dcox        6/6/2013    Initial Build

    */

    -- Banner
    CURSOR c_get_banner
    IS
        SELECT banner
          FROM v$version
         WHERE UPPER(banner) LIKE UPPER('Oracle Database%');

    vrec_banner c_get_banner%ROWTYPE; -- row record
    v_database VARCHAR2(32767); --

BEGIN
    -- Get banner to get edition
    OPEN c_get_banner;
    FETCH c_get_banner INTO vrec_banner;
    CLOSE c_get_banner;

    -- Check for Database type
    IF INSTR( UPPER(vrec_banner.banner), 'EXPRESS') > 0
    THEN
        v_database := 'EXPRESS';
    ELSIF INSTR( UPPER(vrec_banner.banner), 'STANDARD') > 0
    THEN
        v_database := 'STANDARD';
    ELSIF INSTR( UPPER(vrec_banner.banner), 'PERSONAL') > 0
    THEN
        v_database := 'PERSONAL';
    ELSIF INSTR( UPPER(vrec_banner.banner), 'ENTERPRISE') > 0
    THEN
        v_database := 'ENTERPRISE';
    ELSE
        v_database := 'UNKNOWN';
    END IF;

    RETURN v_database;
EXCEPTION
    WHEN OTHERS
    THEN
        RETURN 'ERROR:' || SQLERRM(SQLCODE);
END fn_which_edition; -- function fn_which_edition
/

Done.

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